Veteran Polish weather expert joins staff of Smithsonian Institution. Washington, D.C. March 14. With home, laboratory, and invaluable records of years presumably lost in the recent Polish War, Dr. Henryk Arctowski, of the University of Lvov, one of Poland's foremost scientists and former Antarctic explorer, has started at the Smithsonian Institution the monumental job of determining direct effects of changes in the Sun's radiation on weather conditions on Earth. Recognized in all countries as one of the greatest living authorities on world weather, Dr. Arctowski is continuing his studies in efforts to find relationships between solar conditions and rainfall, barometric pressure, etc., at various places on Earth. His earliest meteorlogical observation began as a young geologist on the Antarctic exploring ship Belgica in 1897-99. For release morning papers of March 18 - 40

U.S. experts test weather device. Washington, D.C., Sept. 13. Scientists of the National Bureau of Standards today conducted a test of the new radiometeorograph, a device attached to parachute and balloon and sent into the skies to radio back signals giving the pressure, temperature and humidity of the upper air. Preparing the balloon for the ascension are Dr. L.V. Astin, (left) of the Bureau's Electrical Division, and Dr. L.F. Curtiss, head of the Radium Division. The balloon carries the instrument as high as 50,000 or 60,000 feet. 9 to 11 miles high. Today's test was conducted for the U.S. Weather Bureau. 9/13/37

New radio meteorograph developed for the U.S. Navy. Washington, D.C., June 9. The National Bureau of Standards has recently developed for the U.S. Navy Meteorological Service a new radio meteorograph. The new instrument (shown in the picture) is sent up on a 5-Foot balloon and is expected to replace the use of airplanes in upper-air meteorological surroundings. E.G. Lapham, Associate Physicist of the bureau, is shown assembling the new meteorograph in preperation for an ascent. The device transmits audio notes which are a function of temperature and humidity. These notes are interrupted at approximately each 10-millibar increment in pressure, thus identifying each temperature and humidity indication with its respective increment of altitude, 6/9/37

Receives National Geographic Society award. Washington, D.C., April 27. Dr. Thomas C. Poulter, senior scientist and second in command of the Byrd Antarctic expedition of 1933-35, was awarded a special cold medal of the National Geographic Society at a ceremony today at the society's headquarters in Washington. On the Byrd expedition, Dr. Poulter's scientific work included geophysical investigations, studies of ice conditions and movement, the making of magnetic soundings, and observations of meteors and auroral phenomena. In the photograph, left to right: Dr. John Oliver La Gorce, vice president of the National Geographic Society, Dr. Golbert Grosvenor, president of the society who presented the award, Dr. Thomas C. Poulter, and Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd

Poland's tribute to America. Miss Liberty in Poland, the Statue of Liberty held up her light on July 4 as brightly in Warsaw, Poland's capital, as she did in the harbor of New York. A replica of the famous statue was erected on the balcony of the National Opera on Independence Day, which is now a national holiday with the Poles. The celebration this year was arranged as a testimonial to the Americans of the Red Cross, the embassy and other organizations now in Poland. The square before the opera was the scene of the celebration and the balcony was the reviewing stand for Americans

Poland's tribute to America. Old Glory flies over Warsaw, as a testimonial to America which is the model of the new republic, Poland this year declared America's Independence Day a national holiday. The celebration, a demonstration before American Red Cross personnel and either Americans in Warsaw, was one which has never been surpassed in the United States for enthusiasm. All day long the Stars and Stripes floated from the tower of the city hall in Warsaw, Poland's capital, and all day thousands of children marched through the great plaza beneath the flag and before the replica of the Statue of Liberty which was erected on the high balcony of the opera. The celebration is shown in detail in the Red Cross motion picture film "Poland's tribute to America"

Measuring relative humidity by radio. Washington, D.C. June 9. The hair element for measuring relative humidity in radio weather sounding balloons has proved innacurate because of very slow response at the cold temperatures encountered in the upper atmosphere. F.W. Dunmore, Radio Engineer of National Bureau of Standards, has just developed a new device for the U.S.Navy which will overcome this effect and at the same time will not be affected in response by temperature. He is shown in the photograph observing a graph on the recorder being produced by radio signals from an ascending balloon carrying the new device. This is the first record obtained with this new developement and shows a repidity of response much greater than the hair hygrometers Hitherto used. 6937

Poland's tribute to America. The old Schloss Tower, there is probably no more famous tower in Eastern Europe than that of the old Schloss, or palace in Cracow, the city which was once the capital of Poland. The tower is on the cathedral enclosed within the palace walls and beside it stands the newer and leftier, but less historic one. Beneath it lie the tombs of all the Polish kings who struggled to maintain the integrity of the country, many having given their lives on the battlefield for their country's cause. Cracow, the capital and the historic tombs of kings passed into Austrian hands with the partition of Poland and has only been rejoined to the mother country since 1918. The cathedral is veritably the shrine of Poland

A fragment of largest shooting star placed in Smithsonian Institution. Washington, D.C., April 4. This 2,000 pound meteorite, probably a fragment of one of the largest shooting stars which have struck the earth, has been added to the meteorite collection of the Smithsonian Institution. It was found in 1903 near the town of Pearcedale, not far from Melbourne, Australia, the general area of the Cranbourne Meteorite which was discovered in 1854. E.P. Henderson, of the Smithsonian Institution, is pictured inspecting the huge mass, 4-4-39

Final check, weather device. Washington, D.C., Sept. 13. L.L. Stockman, also of the Bureau of Standards, Radium Division, uses a wave meter to check the radiometeorograph before attaching it to the parachute and the balloon. When the inflated bag breaks, which it usually does after several hours flying, the instrument is parachuted to the ground. Many times the instrument is found and returned to the bureau. The radiometeorograph contains two radio tubes, a miniature dry cell battery and devices which record and send the weather signals which, in turn, are recorded on a chronograph in Dr. Astin's bood [?] radio room.

Poland's tribute to America. The rag pickers in the old quarter of Poland's capital, Warsaw, in slum-life which makes the east side of New York seem a luxurious place. Nearly half the population is crowded into the quarter known as the old city, but which is really the slums, although it does not form that large a percentage of the area of the city by a great measure. The rag pickers in the market place of the old quarter are among those who spend their lives in squalor. This section of the city is shown in the Red Cross travel story "Poland's tribute to America"

This may help the weather reports. These transoceanic flyers, meeting in Washington with officials of the U.S. Weather Bureau and the Department of Commerce. the Meteorology Committee of the Guggenheim Foundation and representatives of other aeronautical interests, hope to help in improving weather service for aviators. Left to right, seated: Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Aeronautics William P. McCracken, Jr. , Lt. A.F. Hagenberger, Col. Arthur C. Goebel, Paul Schluter, Charles Levine, left to right, standing: Emory Bronte, Edward F. Schlee, Clarence Chamberlain, Lt. Lester J. Maitland, William S. Brock, and Berndt Balchen

This may help the weather reports. These transoceanic flyers, meeting in Washington with officials of the U.S. Weather Bureau and the Department of Commerce. the Meteorology Committee of the Guggenheim Foundation and representatives of other aeronautical interests, hope to help in improving weather service for aviators. Left to right, seated: Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Aeronautics William P. McCracken, Jr. , Lt. A.F. Hagenberger, Col. Arthur C. Goebel, Paul Schluter, Charles Levine, left to right, standing: Emory Bronte, Edward F. Schlee, Clarence Chamberlain, Lt. Lester J. Maitland, William S. Brock, and Berndt Balchen

Last survivor of Greely Arctic Expedition honored on 80th birthday. Washington, D.C., Dec. 21. Brig. Gen. David L. Brainard, U.S.A. Retired, was singally honored today on the occasion of his 80th birthday. At a ceremony at the Army and Navy Club the famous explorer was presented with a scroll making him the first honorary member of the American Polar Society. Mrs. Marie Ahnighito Peary Stafford, daughter of the late Robert E. Peary, is shown making the presentation while Russel J. Walreth, Vice President of the American Polar Society, looks on

"Father of modern airconditioning" honored. Washington, D.C. Oct. 8. A bronze bust of Lord Kelvin of Largs, nineteenth century scientist who formulated the laws of thermodynamics, was presented to the Smithsonian Institution today by officials of the English-speaking [...] Lord Kelvin is credited with being the "father of modern refrigeration and airconditioning". In the photograph, Dr. C.G. Abbot, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, is shown accepting the bust from V.A.L. Mallet, counselor of the British Embassy who made the presentation on behalf of the English-Speaking Union

Poland's tribute to America. Symbol of a dynasty, the famous Jagielle statue in Cracow, the old capital of Poland is the greatest existing symbol of Poland's greatest dynasty of Kings. It was under the Jagielle family which came by marriage to the throne, that Poland reached the distinction of a European power. The kings were wise and brave and at the end of the succession Poland had been established in the face of the hostility of surrounding nations. In the decline which followed the remarkable line of rules, , came the events which finally partitioned the country. Cracow the old capital was only regained by Poland when the nation was set up again in 1918 after the war

A new cure discovered. Poland has just discovered that plenty of good fresh air is a great medicine. Before the arrival of the American Red Cross health units in Poland, two and three families lived in one room. Hundreds of children were dying with tuberculosis but no one thought of fresh air. This group of children were found living under just such conditions. Now they are living in a Red Cross hospital with plenty of fresh air and good healthy exercise. The new treatment is proving the salvation of Poland's tubercular children

Gathering meteorological data from stratosphere. Dr. L.F. Curtiss, of the U.S. Bureau of Standards, is shown here with part of the equipment he uses in experiments using radio to gather meteorological data at great altitudes. The complete radio apparatus for attachment to a balloon weighs less than two pounds, and preliminary trials show that the signals can be heard clearly at altitudes of 14 miles and at distances of 80 miles. A direction finder [...]bles experimenters to determine the location [...] he balloon the instant the radio wave is [...] out. 10/17/35

Poland's tribute to America. Americans at heart, Warsaw's prettiest girls, carrying American flags were members of the entertainment committee which cared for Americans on the Fourth of July when Poland celebrated independence day in honor of America The girls welcomed the Americans in the balcony of the National Opera, while a double row of smaller girls lining the stairway to the baclony, strewed flowers over the steps as the Americans came in. The great difficulty in obtaining American flags did not prevent many being in evidence, for scores of families had them among their treasured possessions and flew them from the windows as the morning of the Fourth dawned

Gathering meteorological data from stratosphere. Dr. L.F. Curtiss, of the U.S. Bureau of Standards, is shown here with part of the equipment he uses in experiments using radio to gather meteorological data at great altitudes. The complete radio apparatus for attachment to a balloon weighs less than two pounds, and preliminary trials show that the signals can be heard clearly at altitudes of 14 miles and at distances of 80 miles. A direction finder ...bles experimenters to determine the location ... he balloon the instant the radio wave is ... out. 101735

Veteran Polish weather expert joins staff of Smithsonian Institution. Washington, D.C. March 14. With home, laboratory, and invaluable records of years presumably lost in the recent Polish War, Dr. Henryk Arctowski, of the University of Lvov, one of Poland's foremost scientists and former Antarctic explorer, has started at the Smithsonian Institution the monumental job of determining direct effects of changes in the Sun's radiation on weather conditions on Earth. Recognized in all countries as one of the greatest living authorities on world weather, Dr. Arctowski is continuing his studies in efforts to find relationships between solar conditions and rainfall, barometric pressure, etc., at various places on Earth. His earliest meteorlogical observation began as a young geologist on the Antarctic exploring ship Belgica in 1897-99. For release morning papers of March 18 - 40

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united states district of columbia washington dc glass negatives veteran weather expert weather expert staff smithsonian institution smithsonian institution washington march home laboratory records years polish war polish war henryk arctowski henryk arctowski university lvov one poland scientists antarctic explorer antarctic explorer job effects changes sun radiation conditions weather conditions earth countries authorities world world weather studies efforts relationships rainfall pressure places observation geologist ship belgica ship belgica release papers doctor physician dc
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1940
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Harris & Ewing, photographer
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Washington, District of Columbia, United States ,  38.90719, -77.03687
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Library of Congress
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http://www.loc.gov/item/hec2009015035/
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No known restrictions on publication.

Explore: weather conditions

Washington, D.C. The U.S. Weather Bureau station at the National Airport. Flight advisory weather service. Here pilots in flight are warned of adverse weather conditions that might affect the safe operation of the aircraft

Untitled photo, possibly related to: Spanish trapper talking to his helper about the scarcity of muskrats this year because of the flood and adverse weather conditions. In the marshland near Delacroix Island, Louisiana

Migratory field worker picking cotton in San Joaquin Valley, California. These pickers are paid seventy-five cents per hundred pounds of picked cotton. Strikers organizing under CIO union (Congress of Industrial Organizations) are demanding one dollar. A good male picker, in good cotton, under favorable weather conditions, can pick about two hundred pounds in a day's work

Washington, D.C. The U.S. Weather Bureau station at the National Airport. Flight advisory weather service. Here pilots in flight are warned of adverse weather conditions that might affect the safe operation of the aircraft

Donald Gill, Cache County, Utah beekeeper needed bees, sugar and equipment to weather a series of bad seasons caused by weather conditions. A Farm Security Administration rehabilitation loan put him on his feet again

Veteran Polish weather expert joins staff of Smithsonian Institution. Washington, D.C. March 14. With home, laboratory, and invaluable records of years presumably lost in the recent Polish War, Dr. Henryk Arctowski, of the University of Lvov, one of Poland's foremost scientists and former Antarctic explorer, has started at the Smithsonian Institution the monumental job of determining direct effects of changes in the Sun's radiation on weather conditions on Earth. Recognized in all countries as one of the greatest living authorities on world weather, Dr. Arctowski is continuing his studies in efforts to find relationships between solar conditions and rainfall, barometric pressure, etc., at various places on Earth. His earliest meteorlogical observation began as a young geologist on the Antarctic exploring ship Belgica in 1897-99. For release morning papers of March 18 - 40

Observing work of the busy bee. E.L. Sechrist, associate agriculturist of the bee culture laboratory, U.S. Department of Agriculture, makes tests of how much work the bees accomplish under different weather conditions be checking the weight of the colonies. During a good honey flow under favorable weather conditions, a colony increases in weight as much as 20 pounds in a single day, 1/20/30

Spanish trapper talking to his helper about the scarcity of muskrats this year because of the flood and adverse weather conditions. In the marshland near Delacroix Island, Louisiana

Donald Gill, Cache County, Utah beekeeper needed bees, sugar and equipment to weather a series of bad seasons caused by weather conditions. A Farm Security Administration rehabilitation loan put him on his feet again

Explore: geologist

W.W. Cut, oil expert and geologist, who gave the Senate oil comm. valuable information about the Teapot Dome oil lands

Sherman County, Texas. Geologist with bags of cuttings from different depths of a wildcat well which is drilling a core

America's petroleum industries pour out fuel and lubricants for the United Nations. A geologist, employed by one of the important U.S. oil companies, surveys, with the help of his "rod man" standing on the ridge in the background, a section of land to detect the presence of a possible oil deposit under the ground. "Hit or miss" methods of drilling for oil were discarded long ago in the United States. Today careful preliminary surveys and test borings precede the sinking of most oil wells. Geology experts of the important oil companies are able as a rule to read the surface of the ground accurately for the detection of oil deposits. The industry's efficient methods of finding oil have resulted in the enormous amounts of oil produced. According to a U.S. oil company official, the predictable U.S. oil total for the year 1944 will be 1,601,250,000 barrels, a great part of which will supply the armed forces of the United Nations

Corpus Christi, Texas. Lieutenant Glenn Ramsey, intelligence officer at the Civil Air Patrol base. He was formerly a geologist in the Oklahoma oil fields. The insignia on his desk, for the local "Wolf Patrol", was designed by one of the pilots who was formerly in the advertising business

Sherman County, Texas. Geologist and two roughnecks on a core drilling crew

[Manuscript painting of Heezen-Tharp "World ocean floor" map by Berann].

Amarillo, Texas. Geologist making a log of a well from examination of cutting taken from different depths during the drilling of the well by the Phillips Petroleum Company

[Samuel Franklin Emmons, geologist, three-quarter length portrait, facing right] / W. Kurtz, Madison Square.

C.E. Van Orstrand, Physical Geologist, U.S. Geological Survey

Explore: rainfall

Wheat stubble burning. Because of above-normal rainfall this season, the wheat developed more straw, and the fire hazard both before harvest and in the stubble was great. Walla Walla County, Washington

Wheat stubble burning. Because of above-normal rainfall this season, the wheat developed more straw, and the fire hazard both before harvest and in the stubble was great. Walla Walla, Washington

Weather Bureau, measuring rainfall

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Four-year-old guayule shrubs. Guayule requires from seven to fifteen inches of rainfall annually, ten inches being ideal for successful cultivation

Farm scene. Vale-Owyhee irrigation project, Malheur County, Oregon. Rainfall is insufficient in this section for anything but irrigated farming

10 year moving averages of rainfall by areas

Maps, plans, restorations, etc. Statistical table of Jerusalem rainfall since 1861

Record of rainfall in Jerusalem.

Record of rainfall in Jerusalem.

Topics

united states district of columbia washington dc glass negatives veteran weather expert weather expert staff smithsonian institution smithsonian institution washington march home laboratory records years polish war polish war henryk arctowski henryk arctowski university lvov one poland scientists antarctic explorer antarctic explorer job effects changes sun radiation conditions weather conditions earth countries authorities world world weather studies efforts relationships rainfall pressure places observation geologist ship belgica ship belgica release papers doctor physician dc