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New radio meteorograph developed for the U.S. Navy. Washington, D.C., June 9. The National Bureau of Standards has recently developed for the U.S. Navy Meteorological Service a new radio meteorograph. The new instrument (shown in the picture) is sent up on a 5-Foot balloon and is expected to replace the use of airplanes in upper-air meteorological surroundings. E.G. Lapham, Associate Physicist of the bureau, is shown assembling the new meteorograph in preperation for an ascent. The device transmits audio notes which are a function of temperature and humidity. These notes are interrupted at approximately each 10-millibar increment in pressure, thus identifying each temperature and humidity indication with its respective increment of altitude, 6/9/37

New radio meteorograph developed for the U.S. Navy. Washington, D.C., June 9. The National Bureau of Standards has recently developed for the U.S. Navy Meteorological Service a new radio meteorograph. The new instrument (shown in the picture) is sent up on a 5-Foot balloon and is expected to replace the use of airplanes in upper-air meteorological surroundings. E.G. Lapham, Associate Physicist of the bureau, is shown assembling the new meteorograph in preperation for an ascent. The device transmits audio notes which are a function of temperature and humidity. These notes are interrupted at approximately each 10-millibar increment in pressure, thus identifying each temperature and humidity indication with its respective increment of altitude, 6/9/37

 
 

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