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Reconnoissance of the Mississippi River below Forts Jackson and St. Philip : made previous to the reduction by the U.S. Fleet, under the command of flag officer D.G. Farragut, U.S.N. /

Reconnoissance of the Mississippi River below Forts Jackson and St. Philip : made previous to the reduction by the U.S. Fleet, under the command of flag officer D.G. Farragut, U.S.N. /

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description

Summary

At head of title: U.S. Coast Survey. Prof. A. D. Bache, Supt.
Stamped in lower right corner: From collection of David Dixon Porter.
Pen and ink manuscript drawn on tracing cloth, covering the environs of forts St. Philip and Jackson, Louisiana.
"Note: The forts and their immediate vicinity were taken from data furnished by Major Barnard, U.S.E., excepting the trigonometrical determinations of the forts and the hulks. This chart to be returned to Capt. D. D. Porter, U.S.N., after its use in the river ceases."
LC Civil War maps (2nd ed.) 235
Available also through the Library of Congress Web site as a raster image.

In the early years of the war many civilian ships were confiscated for military use, while both sides built new ships. The most popular ships were tinclads—mobile, small ships that actually contained no tin. These ships were former merchant ships, generally about 150 feet in length, with about two to six feet of draft, and about 200 tons. Shipbuilders would remove the deck and add an armored pilothouse as well as sheets of iron around the forward part of the casemate and the engines. Most of the tinclads had six guns: two or three twelve-pounder or twenty-four-pounder howitzers on each broadside, with two heavier guns, often thirty-two-pounder smoothbores or thirty-pounder rifles, in the bow. These ships proved faster than ironclads and, with such a shallow draft, worked well on the tributaries of the Mississippi.

date_range

Date

01/01/1862
person

Contributors

United States Coast Survey.
Gerdes, F. H.
Bache, A. D. (Alexander Dallas), 1806-1867.
Hawley, Joseph R. (Joseph Roswell), 1826-1905.
Bowen & Co.
create

Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

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