Library Of Congress
Library Of CongressPublic Domain ArchivePart of PICRYL.com. Not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
St. Elizabeths Hospital, Stable, 2700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

St. Elizabeths Hospital, Stable, 2700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue Southeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  • save_altThumbnail200x200
  • save_altSmall640x458
  • save_altMedium1024x732
  • save_altLarge1600x1144
  • save_altOriginal3840x2745
description

Summary

Significance: The stable at St. Elizabeths Hospital was built in 1901 as part of the major expansion of hospital facilities undertaken by superintendent Alonzo Richardson. Designed by the prominent Boston architectural firm Shepley Rutan and Coolidge in a craftsman style, the stable was located on the east side of what was then Nichols Avenue as part of the hospital's agricultural buildings. It was constructed in the form of a large (100' x 212') rectangle; in plan the building consists of three wings enclosing a courtyard. According to the original construction drawings, the long east wing originally contained stalls for 65 horses and mules on the first floor, with a hayloft above. The north wing housed carts and wagons on the first floor, with rooms for farm hands on the second floor. The south wing housed carriages on the first floor, with rooms for stable men on the second floor. One-and-a-half stories in height, the first floor walls of the stable were built of load-bearing brick masonry construction with stone lintels, spring blocks, and keystones. The second story walls and roof were built of wood framing and sheathed in with wood shingles. Walls and ceilings of the second floor accommodations were plastered. The accommodations were substantially renovated in 1915, including changes to the layouts and the installation of new bathrooms. Also at an early date, a number of the original gable dormers and ventilators were removed, and a new cement asbestos shingle roof installed. Some time later, at an unknown date, the original entrance archway and a portion of the west wall were demolished.
Unprocessed Field note material exists for this structure: N991
Survey number: HABS DC-349-Q
Building/structure dates: 1901 Initial Construction
Building/structure dates: 1915 Subsequent Work
National Register of Historic Places NRIS Number: 79003101

person

Contributors

Historic American Buildings Survey, creator
Shepley Rutan & Coolidge
Schara, Mark, field team
Clemence, Matthew A, field team
Rainey, Krishna A, field team
Royer, Laura, field team
Schara, Mark, project manager
Price, Virginia Barrett, transmitter
Rosenthal, James, photographer
Boucher, Jack E, photographer
place

Location

Washington, District of Columbia, United States38.86867, -76.97583
Google Map of 38.8686654, -76.9758274
create

Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government; images copied from other sources may be restricted. http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html

Explorematthew a clemence

Explorekrishna a rainey

Exploreavenue southeast

Library Of Congress

The objects in this archive are from Library of Congress - the nation’s first established cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with millions of items including books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library provides Congress, the federal government and the American people with a rich, diverse and enduring source of knowledge to inform, inspire and engage them and support their intellectual and creative endeavors.

Disclaimer: A work of the Library of Congress is "a work prepared by an officer or employee" of the federal government "as part of that person's official duties." In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act, such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This website is developed as a part of the world's largest public domain archive, PICRYL.com, and not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress, https://www.picryl.com

Developed by GetArchive, 2015-2019