Library Of Congress
Library Of CongressPublic Domain ArchivePart of PICRYL.com. Not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin
St. Louis fair grounds / St. Louis Democrat Litho. & Print. Co. ; drawn by C.N. Dry.

St. Louis fair grounds / St. Louis Democrat Litho. & Print. Co. ; drawn by C.N. Dry.

  • save_altThumbnail200x200
  • save_altSmall640x486
  • save_altMedium1024x778
  • save_altLarge1600x1216
  • save_altOriginal3840x2918
  • photo_size_select_largeUpscale 2x7680x5836
description

Summary

Print showing bird's-eye view of fairgrounds at the St. Louis fair.
11770 U.S. Copyright Office.
Title from item.
Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1874, by Compton & Company, in the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington C.D. [i.e., D.C.].

The history of St. Louis, Missouri from 1866 was marked by rapid growth, and the population of St. Louis increased so that it became the fourth largest city in the United States after New York City, Philadelphia, and Chicago. This collection includes "Pictorial St. Louis, the Great Metropolis of the Mississippi Valley, a Topographical Survey Drawn in Perspective, A.D. 1875, by Camille N. Dry, Designed and Edited by Richard J. Compton." During and shortly after the Civil War, St. Louis had suffered: cholera and typhoid in 1866. In the early 1870s, new industries began to grow in St. Louis. By 1880, St. Louis was the third largest raw cotton market in the United States with industries such as brewing, flour milling, slaughtering, machining, and tobacco processing, paint, bricks, bag, iron. Among the downsides to rapid industrialization was pollution. Brick firing produced particulate air pollution and paint making created lead dust, while beer and liquor brewing produced grain swill. During the 1880s, the city grew from 350,518 to 451,770, making it the country's fourth-largest. The Panic of 1893 and subsequent depression and the overproduction of grain hit flour milling and most industries suffered declines.

date_range

Date

01/01/1874
collections

In Collections

create

Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

No known restrictions on publication.

Explorefairs

Exploredemocrat

Explorelitho

Library Of Congress

The objects in this archive are from Library of Congress - the nation’s first established cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with millions of items including books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library provides Congress, the federal government and the American people with a rich, diverse and enduring source of knowledge to inform, inspire and engage them and support their intellectual and creative endeavors.

Disclaimer: A work of the Library of Congress is "a work prepared by an officer or employee" of the federal government "as part of that person's official duties." In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act, such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This website is developed as a part of the world's largest public domain archive, PICRYL.com, and not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress, https://www.picryl.com

Developed by GetArchive, 2015-2020