Library Of Congress
Library Of CongressPublic Domain ArchivePart of PICRYL.com. Not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress
[Unidentified sailors in Union uniforms with American flag in front of painted backdrop showing ship deck with Monitor class ship in the distance]

[Unidentified sailors in Union uniforms with American flag in front of painted backdrop showing ship deck with Monitor class ship in the distance]

 
 
description

Summary

Title devised by Library staff.
Case: Thermoplastic fruit and scroll.
Digital photo with mat removed by Mike O'Donnell.
Gift; Tom Liljenquist; 2010; (DLC/PP-2010:105).
More information about this collection is available at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.lilj
Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress).
Exhibited: "The Last Full Measure : Civil War Photographs from the Liljenquist Family Collection" at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., 2011.
pp/liljunion

In the early years of the war many civilian ships were confiscated for military use, while both sides built new ships. The most popular ships were tinclads—mobile, small ships that actually contained no tin. These ships were former merchant ships, generally about 150 feet in length, with about two to six feet of draft, and about 200 tons. Shipbuilders would remove the deck and add an armored pilothouse as well as sheets of iron around the forward part of the casemate and the engines. Most of the tinclads had six guns: two or three twelve-pounder or twenty-four-pounder howitzers on each broadside, with two heavier guns, often thirty-two-pounder smoothbores or thirty-pounder rifles, in the bow. These ships proved faster than ironclads and, with such a shallow draft, worked well on the tributaries of the Mississippi.

More than 2,500 special portrait photographs, called ambrotypes and tintypes, and small card photos called cartes de visite represent both Union and Confederate soldiers during the American Civil War (1861-1865). Tom Liljenquist and his sons Jason, Brandon, and Christian built this collection in memory of President Abraham Lincoln and the estimated 620,000-850,000 Union and Confederate servicemen who died in the American Civil War. For many, these photographs are the last known record we have of who they were and what they looked like. See "From the Donor's Perspective--The Last Full Measure" for the full story. The Liljenquist Family began donating their collection to the Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division in 2010, and continues to add to it. In addition to the ambrotypes and tintypes, the collection also includes several manuscripts, patriotic envelopes, photographs on paper, and artifacts related to the Civil War. The portraits often show weapons, hats, canteens, musical instruments, painted backdrops, and other details that enhance the research value of the collection. Other photo topics include flags, city views, veterans, and ships. Among the rarest images are sailors, African Americans in uniform, Lincoln campaign buttons, and portraits of soldiers with their families and friends. LOC Prints & Photographs Division holds thousands of images relating to the Civil War, found in many different collections.

date_range

Date

01/01/1861
place

Location

create

Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

No known restrictions on publication.