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West Philadelphia Manufacturing Cos. starch & sarina works Js. Queen del. ; P.S. Duval & Son's Lith. Phila

West Philadelphia Manufacturing Cos. starch & sarina works Js. Queen del. ; P.S. Duval & Son's Lith. Phila

 
 
description

Summary

Print shows a street view of the factory buildings of the West Philadelphia Manufacturing Co., with street and railroad in the foreground.
Title from item.
Caption continues: Refined pearl starch & corn farina. Chestnut & Bridgewater Streets, Philadelphia.
Stamped on back at lower left: From the file of James F. Queen artist, 1824-1889.
(DLC/PP-1997:105)
Forms part of: Marian S. Carson collection at the Library of Congress.

Alois Senefelder, the inventor of lithography, introduced the subject of colored lithography in 1818. Printers in other countries, such as France and England, were also started producing color prints. The first American chromolithograph—a portrait of Reverend F. W. P. Greenwood—was created by William Sharp in 1840. Chromolithographs became so popular in American culture that the era has been labeled as "chromo civilization". During the Victorian times, chromolithographs populated children's and fine arts publications, as well as advertising art, in trade cards, labels, and posters. They were also used for advertisements, popular prints, and medical or scientific books.

The Americana collection of Marian Sadtler Carson (1905-2004) spans the years 1656-1995 with the bulk of the material dating from 1700 to 1876. The collection includes more than 10,000 historical letters and manuscripts, broadsides, photographs, prints and drawings, books and pamphlets, maps, and printed ephemera from the colonial era through the 1876 centennial of the United States. It is believed to be the most extensive existing private collection of early Americana. The collection includes such important and diverse historical treasures as unpublished papers of Revolutionary War figures and the Continental Congress; letters of several American presidents, including Thomas Jefferson; a manuscript account of the departure of the first Pony Express rider from St. Joseph, Mo.; and what may be the earliest photograph of a human face. Many of the rare books and pamphlets in the collection pertain to the early Congresses of the United States, augmenting the Library's unparalleled collection of political pamphlets and imprints. The Carson Collection adds to the Library's holdings the first presidential campaign biography, John Beckley's Address to the people of the United States with an Epitome and vindication of the Public Life and Character of Thomas Jefferson, published in Philadelphia in 1800. The book was written to counter numerous attacks against Jefferson's character, which appeared in newspapers and pamphlets during the bitter election campaign. The Rare Book and Special Collections Division shares custodial responsibility for the collection with the Library's Geography and Map Division, Music Division, Prints and Photographs Division, and the Manuscript Division.

date_range

Date

01/01/1858
place

Location

Bridesburg (Philadelphia, Pa.)
create

Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

No known restrictions on publication.