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[Man pointing to glass globe during experiment demonstrating the force of air pressure on a vacuum]

R.A.F. [i.e., Royal Air Force] activities against Arab rebellion. Group of R.A.F. staff at Ramleh with wing commander A.H. Flower & sq. leader Singer[?] in centre

North American's P-51 Mustang Fighter is in service with Britain's Royal Air Force, N[orth] A[merican] Aviation, Inc., Inglewood, Calif.

Lucile Mazurek, age 29, ex-housewife, husband going into the service. Working on black-out lamps to be used on the gasoline trailers in the Air Force, Heil and Co., Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Proposes Air Defense Cabinet separate from Army and Navy. Washington, D.C., Jan. 31. Kern Dodge, President of the Air Defense League, appearing before the House Military Affairs Committee today proposed the establishment of an Air Defense Cabinet, separate from the Army and Navy and with an Assistant Secretary as Director. He also urged passage of immediate legislation to build up a synchronized force of pursuit, observation and bombing planes, 1-31-39

P-51 "Mustang" fighter in flight, Inglewood, Calif. The "Mustang", built by North American Aviation, Incorporated, is the only American-built fighter used by the Royal Air Force of Great Britain

Lucile Mazurek, age 29, ex-housewife, husband going into the service, working on black-out lamps to be used on the gasoline trailers in the Air Force, Heil and Co., Milwaukee, Wisc.

Agnes Cliemka, age 23, married and husband may be going into the service any day, Heil and Co., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Agnes used to work in a dep[artmen]t store. Checking of gasoline hose of gasoline trailers before being turned over the Air Force

Helen Ryan, age 41 (with cap), widow and used to work in a show factory, Heil and Co., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Agnes Cliemka, age 23, married and husband may be going into the service any day, brother in the army. [She] used to be a clerk in a dep[artmen]t store. Unmasking and checking parts of the gasoline trailers that will be turned over to the Air Force

R.A.F. [i.e., Royal Air Force] group taken at tower of David for Padre Smith-Master[?]

U.S. Air Force bombs Tripoli. U.S. Army bombers made their first raid on Tripoli recently and returned with this unusal series of pictures showing the results of the raid. Their objective was the Spanish mole at upper left and they were not aiming at ships in the harbor. This photo first in the series was taken at the start of the raid

Bombs lie on an Allied airfield ready to be loaded into Royal Air Force Liberators. The British bombers of the Mediterranian Allied Air Forces worked with American Liberators to strangle German supply lines feeding Nazi troops on the Anzio, Cassino and Eighth Army fronts. French airmen also participated in the operation

8th Army in Tripoli. A Royal Air Force salvage unit plows through mud and water carrying replacement parts which will return a damaged plane to action in the Tripoli campaign

Colonel Robert Kauch, Commanding Officer, Air Service Command, 9th Air Force, Garden City, New York

Lend-Lease to Britain. American 1,100-pound bombs to be used by the Royal Air Force are stacked in an ammunition dump in England, after arriving from the United States in a lend-lease shipment. The dump is in a tunnel one hundred feet underground hewn from solid rock

One year of reciprocal aid. Flight Lieutenant Clifford Taite, Royal Air Force (RAF) takes Captain James R. Hendry, U.S. Army Air Force through the British experts' dossier on a German aircraft that fell into British hands. Reciprocal aid includes information whose value cannot be estimated in terms of money and which has been obtained at a cost measured in thousands of lives and three years of hard fighting

8th Army in Tripoli. Royal Air Force Rescue launch speedboat to action from a desert port on the Mediterranean during the Tripoli campaign

Douglas military aircraft Army. The Douglas A-20 (Havoc) light bomber, called the Boston by the British, is used by both the American Air Force and the Royal Air Force. It was designed as an attack bomber for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations. Because of the speed and performance abilities of this plane, the British have converted a number for use as night fighters. Some have also been used for reconnissance work. Armament details vary according to use, light and heavy guns being mounted in varying combinations

R.A.F. [i.e., Royal Air Force] group taken at tower of David for Padre Smith-Master[?]

Nazi railroad yards at Siena are knocked out. On the alternate line from Pisa and Florence south to Rome, the Siena yards were blasted by Mediterranean Allied Air Force Bombers. Within two months "Operation Strangle" had smashed all large and medium sized railyards at Rome, Rimini, Ancona, Pisa, Arezzo, Foligno, Terni, and Viterbo

Salvo of 600-pound bombs falling from formation of B-10 bombers in recent bombing practice by the 19th Bombardment Group, General Headquarters, Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps

Marshalling yards at Padua after a raid by Mediterranean Allied Air Force bombers. Photo shows the damage done after two night attacks by Royal Air Force Wellingtons

U.S. Air Force bombs Tripoli. Clouds of smoke tell the story of the successful raid by U.S. Army Air Force bombers on the Spanish mole at Tripoli. Their objective was only the mole and not ships in the harbor. This third picture in a series was taken as the bomber group finished its mission

One year of reciprocal aid. British girls and American technicians work together at a U.S. Army Air Force maintenance department. This is only one of dozens of services rendered our forces by British civilians. The British government pays $240,000 a week in wages to civilian workers in the direct employ of the U.S. forces

Aircraft, naval. The Brewster "Buffalo" (F2A-1) Navy fighter is a favorite with many American Air Force and Royal Air Force pilots. This plane, which is usually based on a carrier, is exceedingly maneuverable and capable of excellent performance at high altitudes. Powered by a 1,000 horsepower Wright cyclone engine it has a top speed of about 330 miles per hour, a range of 1,000 miles and a ceiling of approximately 35,000 feet

First Sierra Leonean to fly with Royal Air Force. Leading aircraftman A.K. Hyde of Sierra Leone, West Africa, is one of the first Sierra Leoneans who will fly with the RAF. A former government service employee in the British colony, he was educated at the Grammar School and Methodist Boys High School in Freetown

Smoke shrouds the Signa Bridge. Another target for "Operation Strangle," the Signa Bridge, west of Florence, was smashed by direct hits from Mediterranean Allied Air Force bombers

8th Army in Tripoli. Warehouse on the Spanish Mole, on Tripoli's harbor, managed by U.S. Army 9th Air Force bombers during the attack on Tripoli

U.S. desert airmen check bombing plans. The crew of an U.S. Army Air Force B-25 bomber check their flight plans at a desert air base before taking off to bomb advance Axis position. They are (left to right) Lieutenant Bob Hill, Clear Lake, Iowa, bombardier; Lieutenant Bill Brytan, Denton, Texas, pilot; Lieutenant Jack Cross, Austin, Texas, navigator (he's checking the time); and Lieutenant Don Castle, Saint Joseph, Missouri, co-pilot; (crew member in rear is unidentified)

U.S. Air Force bombs Tripoli. Clouds of smoke tell the story of the successful raid by U.S. Army Air Force bombers on the Spanish mole at Tripoli. Their objective was only the mole and not ships in the harbor. This third picture in a series was taken as the bomber group finished its mission

London (vicinity), England. Two members of the A.T.C. preparing to enter the Air Force working on an airframe

Royal Australian Air Force in Malaya ... flying American "Lockheed Hudsons" ... over Malaya.

Production Executive Committee. First meeting of Production Executive Committee of the War Production Board (WPB). Charles E. Wilson, President of General Electric Company and WPB Vice Chairman of the Committee. Committee members, left to right: Rear Admiral Howard L. Vickery, Vice Chairman, U.S. Maritime Commission; Lieutenant General Brehon B. Somervell, Commanding General, Services of Supply, U.S. Army; Mr. Wilson; Vice Admiral Samuel M. Robinson, Director of Material and Procurement, U.S. Navy; and Major General Oliver P. Echols, Commanding General, Material Command Headquarters, Army, Air Force

Sharpshooter. Smiling from behind the turret of a China Air Task Force bomber is Technical Sergeant Douglas Radney, whose record of one confirmed plane destroyed and three probables qualified him for membership in the China Skeet and Gun Club. Radney was a member of the Tokyo bombers last year and had already earned himself the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Silver Star with a star and the Air Medal

Singapore U.S. made Brewster "Buffalo" pursuit ships being mass-assembled in a hangar in Malaya for the use of Britain's Royal Air Force in the Far East.

Singapore U.S. made "Catalina" flying boats of Britain's Royal Air Force in the Far East setting our [i.e. out] on patrol over the coast of Malaya. From Singapore, they cover thousands of miles of sea regularly.

General Douglas MacArthur, left, congratulates Captain Villamor of the Philippine Air Force, after awarding him the Distinguished Service Cross, December 22, 1941. Captain Villamor was one of the small group of flyers that did heroic service in the Battle of Bataan

Flight instructors McTaggart and Gumison talk things over. Craig Field, Southeastern Air Force Training Center, Alabama

Manila, the Philippine Islands. In one of the last pictures to leave the Philippines before Manila fell to the Japs, General Douglas MacArthur (left) is shown pinning a Distinguished Service Cross on Captain Jesus A. Villamor, of the Philippine Air Force, for heroism in the air. In the center background is Lieutenant Jack Dale, of the U.S. Army Air Corps, who also received a Distinguished Service Cross. At the same time, a posthumous award of the same medal went to Captain Colin P. Kelly, Jr., who bombed and sank a Jap battleship near Luzon

The scuttled French fleet at Toulon: aerial pictures. On November 28, 1942, the day after the scuttling and firing of the ships of the French fleet in Toulon harbor, photographs were taken by the Royal Air Force. Many of the vessels were still burning so that smoke and shadows obscure part of the scene. But the photographs show, besides the burning cruisers, ship after ship of the contre-torpilleurs and destroyer classes lying capsized or sunk, testifying to the thoroughness with which the French seamen carried out their bitter task. While the vast damage done is shown in these photographs, no exact list of the state of the ships can be drawn up, since the ships themselves cannot be seen in an aerial photograph. Thus the upper deck of the battle cruiser Strasbourg is not submerged, but here are signs that the vessel has settled and is grounded. The key plan C.3296 shows the whereabouts of the majority of the ships and their condition as far as it can be seen from the photographs. Picture shows: damaged and sunk light cruisers and destroyers visible through the shadow and the smoke caused by the burning cruisers

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. H.M. King George of Greece arriving on the field, speaking with Mr. Miller

Production. Parachute making. There is far more to hemming this parachute than running the sewing machine. The operator must match pencil marks on the braid with pencil marks on the seams to turn out infallible parachutes for men in the Air Force. Pioneer Parachute Company, Manchester, Connecticut

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. The two teams arriving on the field

A North American "Mustang" for the British Royal Air Force is disassembled prior to crating and shipping

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. Gen[eral view of grand stand with the king

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. The Greek team introduced to air commador

A Danish pilot who is serving with the Royal Air Force in England

Sergeant C.M. Battleship of Sydney, Australia, leader of a RAF (Royal Air Force) attack which destroyed six Junker 52s and damaged others at the El Aden airdrome, examinig some of the telephone wire which was draped from the oil coolers, wireless masts, tail, and rudder if his plane when he returned to the base. Flying low over the road, he cracked through enemy telephone wires

Mitchell Field. An American knight of the air mans the upper gun of one of our new bombers. He, his gun and his plane are typical of the personnel and equipment that have gained world respect for the American Air Force

Production. P-51 "Mustang" fighter planes. A North American "Mustang" fighter plane is placed in a crate for shipment from the plant at Inglewood, California, to the Royal Air Force (RAF). This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 "Billy Mitchell" bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 fighter plane which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Production. A-20 attack bombers. Myriads of lights at the Long Beach, California, plant of Douglas Aircraft Company form pleasing star patterns in the shatterproof plexiglass windows of noses for A-20 attack bombers. The A-20 is used by the American Air Force and Royal Air Force (RAF) for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations--also for reconnaissance work and night fighting. It is armed with light and heavy caliber guns

Production. A-20 attack bombers. Mechanics fuel a new A-20 attack bomber for its trial flight from the Long Beach, California, plant of Douglas Aircraft Company. The A-20 is used by the American Air Force and Royal Air Force (RAF) for hedge hopping and operations against ground troops and installations--also for reconnaissance work and night fighting. It is armed with light and heavy caliber guns

Production. A-20 attack bombers. Mechanics work in a "goldfish bowl", or bombardiers's compartment, of an A-20 attack bomber on the flight ramp of the Long Beach, California, plant of Douglas Aircraft Company. The A-20 is used by the American Air Force and Royal Air Force (RAF) for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations--also for reconnaissance work and night fighting. It is armed with light and heavy caliber guns

Douglas military aircraft Army. The Douglas A-20 (Havoc) light bomber, called the Boston by the British, is used by both the American Air Force and the Royal Air Force. It was designed as an attack bomber for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations. Because of the speed and performance abilities of this plane, the British have converted a number for use as night fighters. Some have also been used for reconnissance work. Armament details vary according to use, light and heavy guns being mounted in varying combinations

Lieutenant Robert "Rocky" Byrnes (in the plane), twenty-six, Saint Louis, Missouri, flying with the Sixty-fourth Squadron of the Fifty-seventy Fighter Group is seen here as he landed after destroying three ME-109's. The Fifty-seventh United States Fighter Group of the Ninth Air Force destroyed seventy-four enemy planes in the same action. Lieutenant Byrnes now has four enemy fighter planes to his credit. He was a pro baseball player with Cincy farm system before the war. Captain Carl A. Nelson, Los Angeles, California, intelligence agen for Sixty-fourth, getting details of Byrnes' part in action

Archbishop Francis J. Spellman of New York, on his recent tour of North African battlefronts, said mass for the men at the Fifty-seventh Fighter Group of the United States Army Ninth Air Force. This Air Force group is located "somewhere in Tunisia" and they are the boys who scored the biggest victory in the history of aviation, knocking almost 100 Axis transports and fighters out of the skies on one engagement. The archbishop held mass in a plane revetment at the Fifty-Seventh fighter base. The altar was set up and mass held on the spot. He said mass whenever and wherever there were boys who were interested in hearing one. Attendants at the mass were Major C.H. Logue, Catholic priest from Cleveland, Ohio, and Capptain J.E. McCarrity, Paulist priest from New York City and Air Force chaplain. They are seen in some of the pictures

Production. A-20 attack bombers. Another Douglas A-20 attack bomber leaves the assembly line at the Long Beach, California, plant for transfer to the flight line and test flight before delivery to the Army. The A-20 is used by the American Air Force and the Royal Air Force (RAF) for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations--also for reconnaissance work and night fighting. It is armed with light and heavy caliber guns

Production. A-20 attack bombers. Mechanics on the flight ramp on the Douglas Aircraft Company at Long Beach, California, check final adjustments on an A-20 attack bomber just before delivery to the Army. The A-20 is used by the American Air Force and Royal Air Force (RAF) for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations--also for reconnaissance work and night fighting. It is armed with light and heavy caliber guns

Captain B.R. Eckstein, Army Air Force's representative at North American climbs into a P-51 Mustang fighter for a final test before acceptance by the Army Air Force

Langley Field, Virginia. YB-17 bombardment squadron. Old Glory floats proudly over the nation's oldest air base at Langley Field, Virginia. Among the Air Force groups stationed at this important point are bombardment squadrons equipped with mighty YB-17 bombers

Los Angeles, California. "Flying Patch," a Currtiss "Warhawk" fighter plane complete except for engine and tail assembly, with simulated bullet holes and patches. It is used at the sheet metal mechanics school operated by the Anderson organization for the United States Army air force technical training command. The soldier trainees are shown punching holes, measuring for patch sizes, drilling, and riveting

Lagg-3 fighters of the Red air force going into action, 1942-43

North American P-51 Mustang Fighter, called "the airplane without a mistake," is in service with Britain's hard-hitting Royal Air Force. The Mustang is the only American-built day fighter used by the Royal Air Force

Kiska, Aleutian Islands. Bombs dropping in train from a United States Army Air Force plane on a Jap objective. Our flyers in Alaska relentlessly pursue their assignment to blast the Japs from their Aleutian holdings. This is an unusually clear shot, for the area thereabouts is fog-bound a good deal of the time

These mechanics servicing a B-17 somewhere in the South Pacific warzone are unsung heroes of the Army Air Force. For every member of the flying crew, there are at least ten ground men who work long hours to keep them flying. Left to right: Sergeant Frank Piotroszer, Hadley, Massachusetts; Corporal William Smith, Woodside, Long Island, New York; Corporal Irvin Andreazza, Weed, Colorado; and Corporal Abe Brodax, Brooklyn, New York

YB-17 bombardment squadron, Langley Field, Virginia. Top-notch performance of our big bombers is made a matter of certainty by the ground crews of the Air Force. A soldier-mechanic at Langley Field, Virginia makes an engine adjustment on a mighty YB-17 bomber under the critical eye of a sergeant

A painter on the flight ramp marks off the transparent enclosure on a North American B-25 bomber before adding the camouflage paint of the United States Army Air Force. Windows covered with brown paper

Mitchell Field. An American knight of the air mans the upper gun of one of our new bombers. He, his gun and his plane are typical of the personnel and equipment that have gained world respect for the American Air Force

Mitchell Field. An American knight of the air mans the upper gun of one of our new bombers. He, his gun and his plane are typical of the personnel and equipment that have gained world respect for the American Air Force

Mitchell Field. An American knight of the air mans the upper gun of one of our new bombers. He, his gun and his plane are typical of the personnel and equipment that have gained world respect for the American Air Force

Twenty-millimeter machine guns for planes. Just as the "long rifle" of the American pioneer was the world's best gun of its day, so the machine guns of our modern air force must be better than any other. Shaping a machine gun barrel is exacting work, but the precision techniques of a former auto plant readily handle the job. Oldsmobile, Lansing, Michigan

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. Gen[eral] view of grand stand with the king

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. About to present the cup (The King)

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. Ball well stopped by Greek goaler

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. The kick off by Air Commador

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. Gen[eral view of grand stand with the king

Somewhere in Eastern India. Royal Air Force men are putting bombs on legs of a "Mohawk." These excellent fighters carry six bombs as well as six machine guns

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. The Y.M.C.A. team

Production. Parachute making. What a boomerang these shroud lines may turn out to be! Made partly from Japanese silk, they are being layed out for marking and cutting. The marker is Charles Baggott, at one time an English butler at the British Embassy in Washington. The parachutes he is helping to produce hold a personal interest for him since his mother and four sisters are in England and his brother is a Royal Air Force (RAF) pilot instructor in Canada. Pioneer Parachute Company, Manchester, Connecticut

The Flying Fortress Goonie has seven Jap Zeros to her credit in 15 combat missions in the South Pacific. This is not an unusual record for these American Air force fighting bombers

Production. A-20 attack bombers. Experienced assembly line workers of both sexes contribute to the production of A-20 attack bombers in the Douglas Aircraft plant at Long Beach, California. The A-20 is used by the American Air Force and the Royal Air Force (RAF) for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations--also for reconnaissance work and night fighting. It is armed with light and heavy caliber guns

An Allied airbase somewhere in Nothern Africa. Four American airmen of the Bombardment Group, United States Army, Ninth Air Force, take just enough time out to receive their citations while their bonber is being refueled. They are shown as they lined up beside their B-24 just before General Auby C. Strickland made the awards. Left to right: Lieutenant Lorey H. Woods, pilot, 1381 Worton Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio; Staff Sergeant Steve E. Rambert, twenty-one, gunner, 2321 North Parkade, Chicago Illinois; Technical Sergeant Wallace Armstrong, nineteen, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 3515 Simon Avenue; Lieutenant Albert P. Miska, navigator bombardier, twenty-five, 449 Compton Avenue, Perth Amboy, New Jersey

Douglas military aircraft Army. The Douglas A-20 (Havoc) light bomber, called the Boston by the British, is used by both the American Air Force and the Royal Air Force. It was designed as an attack bomber for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations. Because of the speed and performance abilities of this plane, the British have converted a number for use as night fighters. Some have also been used for reconnissance work. Armament details vary according to use, light and heavy guns being mounted in varying combinations

Archbishop Francis J. Spellman of New York, on his recent tour of North African battlefronts, said mass for the men at the Fifty-seventh Fighter Group of the United States Army Ninth Air Force. This Air Force group is located "somewhere in Tunisia" and they are the boys who scored the biggest victory in the history of aviation, knocking almost 100 Axis transports and fighters out of the skies on one engagement. The archbishop held mass in a plane revetment at the Fifty-Seventh fighter base. The altar was set up and mass held on the spot. He said mass whenever and wherever there were boys who were interested in hearing one. Attendants at the mass were Major C.H. Logue, Catholic priest from Cleveland, Ohio, and Capptain J.E. McCarrity, Paulist priest from New York City and Air Force chaplain. They are seen in some of the pictures

Douglas military aircraft Army. The Douglas A-20 (Havoc) light bomber, called the Boston by the British, is used by both the American Air Force and the Royal Air Force. It was designed as an attack bomber for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations. Because of the speed and performance abilities of this plane, the British have converted a number for use as night fighters. Some have also been used for reconnissance work. Armament details vary according to use, light and heavy guns being mounted in varying combinations

Bomber crews of the United States Army Ninth Air Force are given a chalk talk before they take off on a mission over Axis Territory. These are some of the heavy bonber groups which are disrupting Axis shipping in the Mediterranean. Giving the blackboard talk is Major Frank W. Delong, squadron commander.

New York, New York. Children's Colony, a school for refugee children administered by a Viennese. German refugee woman reading a letter from her husband, a flier in the Royal Air Force

Production. A-20 attack bombers. Another Douglas A-20 attack bomber leaves the assembly line at the Long Beach, California, plant for transfer to the flight line and test flight before delivery to the Army. The A-20 is used by the American Air Force and the Royal Air Force (RAF) for hedge hopping and strafing operations against ground troops and installations--also for reconnaissance work and night fighting. It is armed with light and heavy caliber guns

Conversion. Frying pans to aircraft parts. From egg poachers and frying pans to caps, struts, flap hinges and other small parts for America's air force; from a dozen employees to forty; that's the story of this small Eastern factory whose defense subcontracts have enabled it to convert rapidly from civilian to war production

Overseas forces observe sabbath with prayer. General view of Protestants' Sunday morning service of the members of the Fourteenth Army Air Force, "somewhere in China"

Army Air Force test pilots prepare to make a routine test flight in a North American B-25 bomber prior to acceptance by the Army

United States Army Air Force officers confering somewhere in the European theater of operation. At the wheel of the jeep is Major Marvin L. McNickle of Doland, South Dakota, with Captain E. A. Vinson of Monticello, Mississippi, and Colonel Harold B. Willis of Boston, Massachusetts

When Archbishop Francis J. Spellman handed a diploma to George J. Robinson at the Fordham University commencement in New York City in 1937, neither had the remotest idea that they would meet again at a United States Air Force fighter base in Tunisia. But that is exactly what happened. Here Monsignor Spellman shakes hands with Robinson, now a corporal, as the Archbishop toured the Tunisian front

Football match on 'Y' field on Ap. 4, 1942 between Greek Air Force & 'Y' teams. King George of Greece present. The Greek team introduced to Air Commador

Paris, France. The Renault workshops on the Ile Seguin and adjacent banks of the Seine were completely destroyed and in fact, rendered unusable for many years on the night of March 3 by the Royal Air Force bombing attack. Tanks, lorries and staff cars were being manufactured for Germany. View of bomb damage in a workshop where industrial vehicles were formerly repaired, showing wrecked lorries in the foreground

Somewhere in Central Africa. Modern science takes its place beside old time African fetishes, as the witch doctors rest between dances. The fish are typical examples of customary ju-ju that has come down through ages of the Dark Continent's history, and the American-built RAF (Royal Air Force) Consolidated Liberator is a sample of the head masks used by the dancers who have streamlined imagination and appreciate the white man's stronger ju-ju

Production. Pratt and Whitney airplane engines. A new Pratt and Whitney airplane motor running on a test stand at a large Eastern plant. Before being shipped to one or another of our aircraft factories, the engine must demonstrate its ability to meet rigid Air Force requirements. Pratt and Whitney Aircraft

The uniforms are different, but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Squadron Leader Lowry, Royal Air Force; Miss Barbara Brady; Pilot Officer James, RAF (Royal Air Force); Squadron Leader Lee, RAF

A portrait of Wing Commander Du Vivier, Belgian airman, the first foreigner to have become a wing commander in the Royal Air Force

New York, New York. Children's Colony, a school for refugee children administered by a Viennese. German refugee child being measured by his mother on the wall of their furnished room. His father is in the Royal Air Force

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