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In Congress, November 23, 1776. Resolved that a committee of five to be appointed, with full powers to devise and execute measures for effectually reinforcing General Washington, and obstructing the progress of General Howe's army, and that they

In Congress, November 23, 1776. Resolved that a committee of five to be appointed, with full powers to devise and execute measures for effectually reinforcing General Washington, and obstructing the progress of General Howe's army, and that they

A plan of the operations of the King's army under the command of General Sir William Howe, K.B. in New York and east New Jersey, against the American forces commanded by General Washington from the 12th of October to the 28th of November 1776, wherein is particularly distinguished the engagement on the White Plains the 28th of October.

The seat of action, between the British and American forces; or, An authentic plan of the western part of Long Island, with the engagement of the 27th August 1776 between the King's forces and the Americans: containing also Staten Island, and the environs of Amboy and New York, with the course of Hudsons River, from Courtland, the great magazine of the American Army, to Sandy Hook,

In Congress. April 14, 1777. Resolved, That from and after the publication hereof ... [Changes in rules and articles for the better government of the troops.] John Hancock, President. Philadelphia: Printed by John Dunlap, 1777.].

A plan of the operations of the King's army under the command of General Sr. William Howe, K.B. in New York and east New Jersey against the American forces commanded by General Washington from the 12th. of October, to the 28th. of November 1776, wherein is particularly distinguished the engagement on the White Plains, the 28th. of October.

Charles Lee Esq'r. - major general of the American forces

Plan of Fort Meigs' and its environs : compricing [sic] the operations of the American forces, under Genl. W.H. Harrison, and the British Army and their allies, under Genl. Proctor and Tecumseh /

[View towards position of American forces from San Juan Hill, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba]

View towards position of American forces from San Juan Hill, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba

View towards position of American forces from San Juan Hill, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba

French movable canteen, type to be adopted for similar use by American forces

A first aid station in the trenches. This dugout in a trench held by the American forces in France is used as a dressing station by the hospital division

Nantillois, a town north of Montfaucon, captured by the American forces, 1918

Montfaucon, showing German observatories & fortifications, captured by the American forces, Sept. 27, 1918

The town of Lucy le Bocage, showing in the center over the house tops, Belleau Woods, captured by the American forces, 1918

German position of resistance in the Argonne Forest, artillery & machine gun nests, captured by the American Forces, 1918

American Forces in Germany, Maÿen, 1920

One year of reciprocal aid. Australia has built many facilities for the American forces, including airfields, barracks and motor vehicles. Here is shown the largest airfield in Australia, covering some forty square miles, with repair hangers, workshops and living quarters. This is one of 100 such fields built in Australia to service the U.S. planes

One year of reciprocal aid. British sailors and U.S. Rangers share a joke as well as ships. More than thirty troops, transports of the British Merchant Navy, were in the first convoy that swept through the Mediterranean in the invasion of North Africa, in company with American forces under escort of the Royal Navy. American aviators flew British Spitfire planes, in a joint action that established the Allied second front. The principle of sharing by the Allies paid tremendous dividends in this action

One year of reciprocal aid. American pilots emerge from the briefing room at a British airfield and mount their bicycles to proceed to their craft. Britian has turned over thousands of bicycles to the American forces

U.S. troops on guard in the New Hebrides. A U.S. Army gun crew, mans a heavy machine gun at a defense employment in the New Hebrides, where British, French and American forces are engaged in joint operations against the Japanese

U.S. forces establish bases in Liberia. Private Napoleon Edward Taylor, first member of the U.S. forces to land in Liberia at the request of the African Negro republic, explains how a sub-machine gun, or "Tommy gun," works. Liberia was originally founded in 1821 by Negro freedmen under American auspices. The American forces, chiefly composed of Negro units, are constructing bridges, improving roads, building air bases and strengthening fortifications throughout the country. Edwin Barclay the Republic's President, welcomed the American soldiers by saying "The future of Liberia is inextricably bound up in the victory of those nations fighting for the Four Freedoms annouced by President Franklin D. Roosevelt."

U.S. forces establish bases in Liberia. These American soldiers stationed in Liberia, Africa, are guarding a dock where supplies are being unloaded. The thatched hut in the background is a repair shop. Chiefly Negro units, the American forces are constructing bridges, improving roads, building air bases and strengthening fortification in this vital sector. The Liberian Republic was founded in 1821 by Negro freedmen under American auspices

Guanica, Puerto Rico (vicinity). Don Luis Quinones, member of an old Puerto Rican family. His house was used as headquarters by the American forces of occupation in the Spanish-American War. He is the father of a FSA (Farm Security Administration) supervisor

This traveling crane is an example of the modern methods used to unload supplies for the American forces in India

Guanica, Puerto Rico (vicinity). Don Luis Quinones, member of an old Puerto Rican family. His house was used as headquarters by the American forces of occupation in the Spanish-American War. He is the father of a FSA (Farm Security Administration) district supervisor

Manpower. Boatyard workers. This mechanic, an American of Chinese origin, belting on a hinge section of a steel ramp boat, is one of the many efficient workers at a large Southern boatyard. This man has relatives fighting in the Chinese army and it is possible that the ramp boats he helps make will carry soldiers of his race cooperating with American forces in recapturing Japanese-held territory. Higgins Industries

This traveling crane is an example of the modern methods used to unload supplies for the American forces in India

American "steam chickens" arrive in Africa. Some of the crew of natives employed by American forces to unload fighter planes at an African airport. These workmen have just uncrated a wing for a P-40

Reciprocal aid. Evidence of British-American cooperation is shown in this picture of U.S. personnel servicing a British Vauxhall and British Humber van, equipment provided American forces under British Reciprocal Aid Program

Reciprocal aid. Sergeant F.D. O'Neal of Chicago, serving with the American air forces in England, makes a motor adjustment on a British Vauxhall. The automobile is part of the supplies and services furnished American forces under British Reciprocal Aid Program

Gen. Pershing pays homage to Unknown Soldier. Washington, D.C., Nov. 11. General John J. Pershing, Commander of the American Forces during the World War, places a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery to observe the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice, 11/11/38

Bringing in 1900 German prisoners captured by American forces, France

Bringing in 1900 German prisoners captured by American forces, France

In Congress, 27th May, 1778 : Establishment of the American Army. I. Infantry. Resolved, that each battalion of infantry shall consist of nine companies ... II. Artillery ... III. Cavalry ... IIII. Provost ...

In Congress, 27th May, 1778 : Establishment of the American Army. I. Infantry. Resolved, that each battalion of infantry shall consist of nine companies ... II. Artillery ... III. Cavalry ... IIII. Provost ...

In Congress, April 29, 1777 : Resolved, that it be recommended to the several states forthwith to order the sums advanced by them for recruiting the Continental battalions, raised by the said states, together with the names of the officers receiving the same, to be transmitted to the pay-masters of such battalions ...

In Congress, April 29, 1777 : Resolved, that it be recommended to the several states forthwith to order the sums advanced by them for recruiting the Continental battalions, raised by the said states, together with the names of the officers receiving the same, to be transmitted to the pay-masters of such battalions ...

Landing of the American forces under Genl. Scott, at Vera Cruz, March 9th, 1847

Landing of the American forces under Genl. Scott, at Vera Cruz, March 9th, 1847

Landing of the American forces under Genl. Scott, at Vera Cruz, March 9th, 1847

By the United States in Congress assembled, August 7, 1782 : Resolved, that the secretary at war, on or before the first day of January next, cause the non-commissioned officers and privates belonging to the lines of the respective states, including soldiers prisoners with the enemy, to be arranged in such a manner as to form complete regiments ...

By the United States in Congress assembled, August 7, 1782 : Resolved, that the secretary at war, on or before the first day of January next, cause the non-commissioned officers and privates belonging to the lines of the respective states, including soldiers prisoners with the enemy, to be arranged in such a manner as to form complete regiments ...

In Congress, March 2, 1778 : Whereas it is essential to the operations of the army during the next campaign, that the most vigorous measures should forthwith be adopted for forming a body of horse ... Resolved, that it be earnestly recommended to the young gentlemen of property and spirit ... to constitute within their respective states a troop or troops of light cavalry ...

In Congress, March 2, 1778 : Whereas it is essential to the operations of the army during the next campaign, that the most vigorous measures should forthwith be adopted for forming a body of horse ... Resolved, that it be earnestly recommended to the young gentlemen of property and spirit ... to constitute within their respective states a troop or troops of light cavalry ...

Limy, through which the American forces passed in cutting off the St. Mihiel Salient, 1918

Limy, through which the American forces passed in cutting off the St. Mihiel Salient, 1918

Thomas Jefferson, August 16, 1780, List of British and American Forces at Battle of Camden

Thomas Jefferson, August 16, 1780, List of British and American Forces at Battle of Camden

In Congress, April 4, 1777 : Resolved, 1. That there be one Commissary-General of Musters for the Army of the United States. 2. That there be four deputy muster-masters general; and that the said appointments be made by Congress. ...

In Congress, April 4, 1777 : Resolved, 1. That there be one Commissary-General of Musters for the Army of the United States. 2. That there be four deputy muster-masters general; and that the said appointments be made by Congress. ...

In Convention for the State of Pennsylvania Saturday, August 10, 1776. [7 resolutions: ordering march of the entire State militia; excepting several western counties: and others relating to the flying camp.] [Philadelphia: Printed by Henry Mille

In Convention for the State of Pennsylvania Saturday, August 10, 1776. [7 resolutions: ordering march of the entire State militia; excepting several western counties: and others relating to the flying camp.] [Philadelphia: Printed by Henry Mille

In Convention for the State of Pennsylvania Saturday, August 10, 1776. [7 resolutions: ordering march of the entire State militia; excepting several western counties: and others relating to the flying camp.] [Philadelphia: Printed by Henry Mille

In Convention for the State of Pennsylvania Saturday, August 10, 1776. [7 resolutions: ordering march of the entire State militia; excepting several western counties: and others relating to the flying camp.] [Philadelphia: Printed by Henry Mille