Library Of Congress
Library Of CongressPublic Domain ArchivePart of PICRYL.com. Not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin

American mothers and sisters, like these women at the Douglas Aircraft Company, give important help in producing dependable planes for their men at the front, Long Beach, Calif. Most important of the many types of aircraft made at this plant are the B-17F ("Flying Fortress") heavy bomber, the A-20 ("Havoc") assault bomber and the C-47 heavy transport plane for the carrying of troops and cargo

Barling bomber

Barling bomber

Martin Bomber

Francis & Martin Bomber

F5L bombing planes 6690

Langley night bombing airplane. Photo, Oct. 15/18 at Frankfort, N.Y.

Breguet bomber

Bombs attached to Martin Bomber Navy photo

Martin Bomber

Martin Bomber

Martin Bomber

Aviation, Army bombers over East Bay area

New Army Bomber arrives at Bolling Field. Washington, D.C., March 10. The new 4 engine Boeing bomber, the first of 13 which will be delivered to the U.S. Army Air Corps, as it landed at Bolling Field today after a short hop from Langley Field, Va., 3/10/1937

Solons inspect new Army Bomber. Washington, D.C. March 10. Members of the House Military Affairs Committee with U.S. Chief of staff General Mailin Craig inspecting the new 4-Engine Boeing Bomber which arrived at Bolling Field today. This ship is first of 13 which will be delivered to the Army Air Corps in the newer future. In the photograph, left to right, can't be seen: Rep. Andrew Edmiston, West Virginia; Rep. Charles I. Faddis, Pa.; Capt. C.E. O'Connor, pilot of the ship; Rep. Andrew J. May, Kentucky; Maj. Gen. Malin H. Craig

Drilling on a Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

Lunchtime brings a few minutes of rest for these women workers of the assembly line at Douglas Aircraft Company's plant, Long Beach, Calif. Sand bags for protection against air raid form the background. Most important of the many types of aircraft made at this plant are the B-17F ("Flying Fortress") heavy bomber, the A-20 ("Havoc") assault bomber, and the C-47 heavy transport plane for the carrying of troops and cargo

Member[s] of the experimental staff at the North American Aviation, Inc., plant, observe wind tunnel tests on an accurate scale model of the B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, Inglewood, Calif. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 Mustang fighter plane which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Mounting motor on a Fairfax B-25 bomber, at North American Aviation, Inc., plant in Inglewood, Calif

Riveters at work on fuselage of Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

Working inside fuselage of a Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

On North American's outdoor assembly line, employees rush a B-25 to completion, North American Aviation, Inglewood, Calif

Workers on the Liberator Bombers, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., [Fort Worth, Texas]

Another North American B-25 bomber rolls off the final assembly line to join other ships on the outdoor assembly line, North

Riveter at work on Consolidated bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

Two women workers are shown capping and inspecting tubing which goes into the manufacture of the "Vengeance" (A-31) dive bomber made at Vultee's Nashville division, Tennessee. The "Vengeance" (A-31) was originally designed for the French. It was later adopted by the R.A.F. and still later by the U.S. Army Air Forces. It is a single-engine, low-wing plane, carrying a crew of two men and having six machine guns of varying calibers

B-25 bomber planes at the North American Aviation, Incorporated being hauled along an outdoor assembly line with an "International" tractor, Kansas City, Kansas

Assembling Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

Here's our mission. A combat crew receives final instructions just before taking off in a mighty YB-17 bomber from a bombardment squadron base at the field, Langley Field, Va.

Riveter at work on Consolidated bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

An employee in the drill-press section of North American's huge machine shop runs mounting holes in a large dural casting, Inglewood, Calif. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Drilling on a Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

B-25 bombers lined up at North American Aviation, Incorporated, almost ready for their first test flight, Kansas City, Kansas

Mounting motor [on a] Fairfax B-25 bomber, at North American Aviation, Inc., plant in [Inglewood], Calif.

Making wiring assemblies at a junction box on the fire wall for the right engine of a B-25 bomber, North American Aviation, Inc., [Inglewood], Calif. Forward of this wall will be mounted one of the two 1,700-horsepower Wright Whirlwind engines which carry the B-25 through performances up to Altitudes of 25,000 feet

View of the B-25 final assembly line at North American Aviation's Inglewood, California, plant

Operating a hand drill at Vultee-Nashville, woman is working on a "Vengeance" dive bomber, Tennessee

North American B-25 bomber is prepared for painting on the outside assembly line, North American Aviation, Inc., Inglewood, Calif

Servicing an A-20 bomber, Langley Field, Va.

Helen Bray, who left school to become a mechanic at a western aircraft plant, is making an emplanage section on a new Consolidated transport, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas. This new ship, adapted from the B-24 bomber, is known as the C-87, carries one of the greatest human and cargo loads of any plane now in mass production

Capping and inspecting tubing: two women are shown capping and inspecting tubing which goes into the manufacture of the "Vengeance" dive bomber made at Vultee's Nashville division, Tennessee. The "Vengeance" (A-31) was originally designed for the French. It was later adopted by the R.A.F. and still later by the U.S. Army Air Forces. It is a single-engine, low-wing plane, carrying a crew of two men and having six machine guns of varying calibers

An A-20 bomber being riveted by a woman worker at the Douglas Aircraft Company plant at Long Beach, Calif.

A noontime rest for a full-fledged assembly worker at the Long Beach, Calif., plant of Douglas Aircraft Company. Nacelle parts for a heavy bomber form the background

A giant of the skyways poises for flight, Langley Field, Va. The four powerful engines of a YB-17 bomber are warmed up before a takeoff

Capping and inspecting tubing: two women are shown capping and inspecting tubing which goes into the manufacture of the "Vengeance" dive bomber made at Vultee's Nashville division, Tennessee. The "Vengeance" (A-31) was originally designed for the French. It was later adopted by the R.A.F. and still later by the U.S. Army Air Forces. It is a single-engine, low-wing plane, carrying a crew of two men and having six machine guns of varying calibers

A giant of the skyways poises for flight, Langley Field, Va. The four powerful engines of a YB-17 bomber are warmed up before a takeoff

Working inside fuselage of a Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

Punching rivet holes in a frame member for a B-25 bomber, the plant of North American Aviation, Inc., Calif.

Production of B-24 bombers and C-87 transports, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas. Cabbie Coleman, former housewife, works at western aircraft plant. Installing of oxygen racks above the flight deck

This woman worker at the Vultee-Nashville is shown making final adjustments in the wheel well of an inner wing before the installation of the landing gear, Nashville, Tenn. This is one of the numerous assembly operations in connection with the mass production of Vultee "Vengeance" dive bombers

B-25 bombers lined up at North American Aviation, Incorporated, almost ready for their first test flight, Kansas City, Kansas

B-25 bombers on the outdoor assembly line at North American Aviation, Incorporated, almost ready for their first test flight, Kansas City, Kansas

One of America's new warships of the air, a mighty YB-17 bomber, is pulled up at a bombardment squadron hangar, Langley Field, Va. It is all set to taxi out to a runway and take off

Employees on the "Sunshine" assembly line at North American's plant put the finishing touches on another B-25 bomber, Inglewood, Calif. In addition to the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, this plant produces the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Here's our mission. A combat crew receives final instructions just before taking off in a mighty YB-17 bomber from a bombardment squadron base at the field, Langley Field, Va

Two women workers are shown capping and inspecting tubing which goes into the manufacture of the "Vengeance" (A-31) dive bomber made at Vultee's Nashville division, Tennessee. The "Vengeance" (A-31) was originally designed for the French. It was later adopted by the R.A.F. and still later by the U.S. Army Air Forces. It is a single-engine, low-wing plane, carrying a crew of two men and having six machine guns of varying calibers

A girl riveting machine operator at the Douglas Aircraft Company plant joins sections of wing ribs to reinforce the inner wing assemblies of B-17F heavy bombers, Long Beach, Calif. Better known as the "Flying Fortress," the B-17F bomber is a later model of the B-17, which distinguished itself in action in the south Pacific, over Germany and elsewhere. It is a long range, high altitude, heavy bomber, with a crew of seven to nine men -- and with armament sufficient to defend itself on daylight missions

A nose wheel and landing gear assembly for a B-25 bomber under construction in a western aircraft plant, North American Aviation, Inc., Calif. A front section of the plane shows in the background. General Doolittle has called the ship the best military plane in existence. With plenty of speed, a 1,700-mile cruising range and a ceiling of 25,000 feet, it has performed brilliantly as a medium bomber and as an escort plane.

Assembling Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

One of America's new warships of the air, a mighty YB-17 bomber, is pulled up at a bombardment squadron hangar, Langley Field, Va. It is all set to taxi out to a runway and take off

The kind of man Hitler wishes we didn't have. A bomber pilot, captain in a bombardment squadron, just before he climbs aboard his huge YN-17 bombing plane

This girl in a glass house is putting finishing touches on the bombardier nose section of a B-17F navy bomber, Long Beach, Calif. She's one of many capable women workers in the Douglas Aircraft Company plant. Better known as the "Flying Fortress," the B-17F is a later model of the B-17 which distinguished itself in action in the South Pacific, over Germany and elsewhere. It is a long range, high altitude heavy bomber, with a crew of seven to nine men, and with armament sufficient to defend itself on daylight missions

Cowling and control rods are added to motors for North American B-25 bombers as they move down the assembly line, North American, Inc., Inglewood, Calif.

A wing brace assembly for a B-25 bomber is prepared for the assembly line of an aircraft plant, North American Aviation, Inc., Calif. With plenty of speed, a 1,700-mile cruising range and a ceiling of 25,000 feet, it has performed as a medium bomber and as an escort plane

Cowling and control rods are added to motors for North American B-25 bombers as they move down the assembly line, N[orth] A[merican] Aviation, Inc., Inglewood, Calif.

Operating a hand drill at Vultee-Nashville, woman is working on a "Vengeance" dive bomber, Tennessee

Drilling horizontal stabilizers: operating a hand drill, this woman worker at Vultee-Nashville is shown working on the horizontal stabilizer for a Vultee "Vengeance" dive bomber, Tennessee. The "Vengeance" (A-31) was originally designed for the French. It was later adopted by the R.A.F. and still later by the U.S. Army Air Forces. It is a single-engine, low-wing plane, carrying a crew of two men and having six machine guns of varying calibers

Men and women make efficient operating teams on riveting and other jobs at the Douglas Aircraft plant, Long Beach, Calif. Most important of the many types of aircraft made at this plant are the B-17F ("Flying Fortress") heavy bomber, the A-20 ("Havoc") assault bomber and the C-47 heavy transport plane for the carrying of troops and cargo

Employees on the "Sunshine" assembly line at North American's plant put the finishing touches on another B-25 bomber, Inglewood, Calif. In addition to the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, this plant produces the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Hitler would like this man to go home and forget about the war. A good American non-com at the side machine gun of a huge YB-17 bomber is a man who knows his business and works hard at it

Another North American B-25 bomber rolls off the final assembly line to join other ships on the outdoor assembly line, North American Aviation, Inc., Inglewood, Calif.

A wing brace assembly for a B-25 bomber is prepared for the assembly line of an aircraft plant, North American Aviation, Inc., Calif. With plenty of speed, a 1,700-mile cruising range and a ceiling of 25,000 feet, it has performed as a medium bomber and as an escort plane

A candid view of one of the women workers touching up the U.S. Army Air Forces insignia on the side of the fuselage of a "Vengeance" dive bomber manufactured at Vultee's Nashville division, Tennessee

An experimental scale model of the B-25 plane is prepared for wind tunnel tests in the plant of North American Aviation, Inc., Inglewood, Calif. This plant produced the B-25 bomber

A fast, hard-hitting new A-20 i.e., B-25 attack bomber is brought for a test hop to the flight line at the Long Beach, Calif., plant of Douglas Aircraft Company

Riveters at work on fuselage of Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp., Fort Worth, Texas

Riveting team working on the cockpit shell of a B-25 [i.e. C-47] bomber at the plant of North American Aviation, Inc., Inglewood [i.e. Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach], Calif.

Punching rivet holes in a frame member for a B-25 bomber, the plant of North American Aviation, Inc., Calif

[Servicing an A-20 bomber, Langley Field, Va.]

Servicing an A-20 bomber, Langley Field, Va

Women at work on bomber, Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, Calif.

B-25 bombers on the outdoor assembly line at North American Aviation, Incorporated, almost ready for their first test flight, Kansas City, Kansas

An A-20 bomber being riveted by a woman worker at the Douglas Aircraft Company plant at Long Beach, Calif

Switch boxes on the firewalls of B-25 bombers are assembled by women workers at North American [Aviation, Inc.]'s Inglewood, Calif., plant

Working on a "Vengeance" dive bomber, Vultee Aircraft Inc., Nashville, Tennessee

Working on a "Vengeance" dive bomber, Vultee [Aircraft Inc.], Nashville, Tennessee

North American B-25 bomber is prepared for painting on the outside assembly line, N[orth] A[merican] Aviation, Inc., Inglewood, Calif.

View of the B-25 final assembly line at North American Aviation's Inglewood, California, plant

On North American's outdoor assembly line, employees rush a B-25 to completion, N[orth] A[merican] Aviation, Inglewood, Calif.

Clerk in one of the stock rooms of North American Aviation, Inc., checking to see if the proper numbers of parts were received and placed in the proper bin, Inglewood, Calif. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

A fast, hard-hitting new A-20 [i.e., B-25] attack bomber is brought for a test hop to the flight line at the Long Beach, Calif., plant of Douglas Aircraft Company

Bomb bay gasoline tanks for long flights of B-25 bombers await assembly in the plant of North American Aviation, Inc., Inglewood, Calif. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Operating a hand drill at Vultee-Nashville, woman is working on a "Vengeance" dive bomber, Tennessee

Working on wing of Consolidated Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp. plant, Fort Worth, Texas

A nose wheel and landing gear assembly for a B-25 bomber under construction in a western aircraft plant, North American Aviation, Inc., Calif. A front section of the plane shows in the background. General Doolittle has called the ship the best military plane in existence. With plenty of speed, a 1,700-mile cruising range and a ceiling of 25,000 feet, it has performed brilliantly as a medium bomber and as an escort plane

B-25 bomber planes at the North American Aviation, Incorporated being hauled along an outdoor assembly line with an "International" tractor, Kansas City, Kansas

Another North American B-25 bomber rolls off the final assembly line to join other ships on the outdoor assembly line, N[orth]

Assembling B-25 bombers at North American Aviation, Kansas City, Kansas

Women at work on bomber, Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, Calif

Working on wing of Consolidated Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp. plant, Fort Worth, Texas

Library Of Congress

The objects in this archive are from Library of Congress - the nation’s first established cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with millions of items including books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library provides Congress, the federal government and the American people with a rich, diverse and enduring source of knowledge to inform, inspire and engage them and support their intellectual and creative endeavors.

Disclaimer: A work of the Library of Congress is "a work prepared by an officer or employee" of the federal government "as part of that person's official duties." In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act, such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This website is developed as a part of the world's largest public domain archive, PICRYL.com, and not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress, https://www.picryl.com

Developed by GetArchive, 2015-2020