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To the people of Kentucky. Fellow citizens [A plea for emancipation and for the election to the convention of persons favourable to it]. [Franklin Co.? Kentucky, April? 1799].

Order rescinding a court decision setting aside Edmund Lyne's will

A Kick at the Broad Bottoms! i.e. - "Emancipation of All the Talents" / Js. Gillray, inv. & fec.

Irish march of intellect; or, the happy result of emancipation / A Sharpshooter fec.

U.S. Reports: McCutchen et al v. Marshall et al, 33 U.S. (8 Pet.) 220 (1834)

U.S. Reports: United States v. The Amistad, 40 U.S. (15 Pet.) 518 (1841)

U.S. Reports: Rhodes v. Bell, 43 U.S. (2 How) 397 (1844)

U.S. Reports: Adams et al. v. Roberts, 43 U.S. (2 How) 486 (1844)

Hymns and songs for the celebration of British West India emancipation, at Abington, July 31, 1858 ... Boston. Prentiss, Sawyer & company, printers, 19 Water Street.

Important discussion on slavery. There will be a discussion at Chapman Hall, on Wednesday Eve., Dec. 15 [1858] on the following question: Is the American slave better off in his present condition than he would be by a speedy emancipation. Betwee

Who is responsible for the war? Who accountable for its horrors and desolations?

J. F. Bullitt, W. E. Hughes, and C. Ripley to Joshua F. Speed, Friday, September 13, 1861 (Telegram urging disavowal of emancipation policy)

Proclamation of Emancipation. Variant preliminary printing.

Alfred Cope and Ernst W. Cope to Abraham Lincoln, Saturday, August 02, 1862 (Compensated emancipation)

John D. Defrees to John G. Nicolay, Wednesday, December 17, 1862 (Emancipation Proclamation)

[Preliminary emancipation proclamation.]

William B. Campbell and Jordan Stokes to Emerson Etheridge, Tuesday, December 16, 1862 (Sends petition concerning Emancipation Proclamation)

James W. Stone to Abraham Lincoln, Tuesday, September 23, 1862 (Telegram concerning reaction to Emancipation Proclamation)

Boston Clergymen to Abraham Lincoln, September 1862 (Petition supporting Emancipation Proclamation)

Schuyler Colfax to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, December 31, 1862 (Emancipation Proclamation)

William H. Seward to Abraham Lincoln, Tuesday, December 30, 1862 (Recommended alterations to Emancipation Proclamation)

Francis A. Hoffman to Abraham Lincoln, Thursday, September 25, 1862 (Telegram supporting Emancipation Proclamation)

Henry Ward Beecher to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, April 16, 1862 (Telegram inquiring about emancipation of slaves in Washington D.C.)

The emancipation of the negroes, January, 1863 - The past and the future / Drawn by Mr. Thomas Nast.

Eliza S. Quincy to Mary Todd Lincoln, Friday, January 02, 1863 (Celebration of Emancipation Proclamation in Boston)

John M. Schofield to Abraham Lincoln, Saturday, June 20, 1863 (Telegram regarding emancipation in Missouri)

Emancipation proclamation, [folded broadside].

Proclamation of emancipation. The second Declaration of Independence! [L. Smith].

[Trial issue of the Emancipation proclamation.]

A contrast ... The end of the rebellion ... General Butler on loyalty ... The friend of the rebels ... The prospect of emancipation by the slaveholders. [1863].

William J. Nicholls to James L. Ridgely, Saturday, December 19, 1863 (Ridgely's position on emancipation)

Isaac N. Arnold to Abraham Lincoln, Tuesday, October 13, 1863 (Requests original draft of Emancipation Proclamation for benefit of North-Western Sanitary Fair)

"Emancipation Day in South Carolina" - the Color-Sergeant of the 1st South Carolina (Colored) addressing the regiment, after having been presented with the Stars and Stripes, at Smith's plantation, Port Royal, January 1

An address to the people of the free states by the President of the Southern Confederacy.

[Paine copy of the Emancipation Proclamation. Copy 2.]

[Roberts and Alvord edition the Emancipation proclamation.]

Abraham Lincoln to John A. J. Creswell, Thursday, March 17, 1864 (Emancipation in Maryland)

The New Year's address of the Newsmen of the New York Herald.

Emancipation Proclamation / del., lith. and print. by L. Lipman, Milwaukee, Wis.

First emancipation proclamation, [Facsimile.]

[A. Kidder Proclamation of Emancipation.]

[Paine copy of the Emancipation Proclamation.]

Abraham Lincoln to Thomas B. Bryan, Monday, January 18, 1864 (Facsimile copies of Emancipation Proclamation)

[A. Kidder copy of the Emancipation proclamation.]

[Miniature emancipation proclamation.]

W. L. Lovelace to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, January 11, 1865 (Telegram reporting emancipation in Missouri)

[A. Kidder copy of the Emancipation proclamation. Copy 2]

[A. Kidder copy of the Emancipation proclamation. Copy 3.]

Emancipation proclamation issued January 1st, 1863, [G. R. Russell].

1861-1863; Proclamation of emancipation by the President of the United States, [C. A. Alvord].

Emancipation. And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves … shall be free!

[Swander Bishop & Co. copy of the Emancipation Proclamation.]

Proclamation emancipation, [Smith/Rosenthal].

The first reading of the Emancipation Proclamation before the cabinet / painted by F.B. Carpenter ; engraved by A.H. Ritchie.

Celebration of the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia by the colored people, in Washington, April 19, 1866 Henry A. Smythe, Esq. Sketched by F. Dielman

[W. H. Pratt copy of the Emancipation Proclamation.]

Emancipation

[W. H. Pratt copy of the Emancipation Proclamation. Copy 2.]

[W. H. Pratt copy of the Emancipation Proclamation. Copy 3.]

[B. B. Russell & Co. copy of the Emancipation Proclamation.]

Proclamation of emancipation by the President of the United States of America, [Russell].

U.S. Reports: Sevier v. Haskell, 81 U.S. (14 Wall.) 12 (1872)

Emancipation Proclamation

[J. S. Smith & Co. copy of the Emancipation Proclamation.]

Emancipation proclamation of President Abraham Lincoln, freeing the slaves of the United States, [Daniel, Sr.] .

Emancipation statue, Washington, D.C.

Emancipation Day, Richmond, Va.

FOSTER, ARDENE. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONER OF BRITISH FEDERAL EMANCIPATION OF SWEATED WOMEN, GIRLS, AND WHITE SLAVE VICTIMS, LONDON

Emancipation Statue, Washington

Statues and sculpture. Emancipation statue

Mr. Carpenter visits an old church in Transylvania with the wife and daughter of our American minister to Bucharest. Inside this edifice are hundreds of valuable Turkish prayer rugs reminders of the days when the Crescent rode high over Central and Eastern Europe to the gates of Vienna A Roumanian rig. N.G. ; Roumanian schoolgirls want to know about "flappers". They too are feeling the wave of feminine emancipation that has captured even that man's stronghold---Constantinople.

U.S. Capitol paintings. Emancipation Proclamation, 1862

Mr. Will Colclough, old resident of Greene County, who was seven years old at the time of the emancipation. Greene County, Georgia

Mr. Will Colelough, old resident of Greene County, who was seven years old at the time of the emancipation. Greene County, Georgia

U.S. Reports: Mahnomen County v. U. S., 319 U.S. 474 (1943)

[Partial copy of the Emancipation Proclamation.]

Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers , Building 71, 100 Emancipation Drive, Hampton, Hampton, VA

Emancipation proclamation, [Ornamental rendition of the Emancipation Proclamation].

[First edition of the emancipation proclamation.]

[Haugg and Sebald copy of the Emancipation Proclamation.]

Proclamation of freedom millions! The emancipation proclamation.

Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers , Building 31, 100 Emancipation Drive, Hampton, Hampton, VA

[Rufus Blanchard edition of the emancipation proclamation. Copy 2]

Emancipation Proclamation. Carpeter's great national picture, The Emancipation Proclamation, before the Cabinet!

Emancipation. And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves, within designated states and parts of States are, and henceforeward [sic] shall be free! [J. L. Magee copy of the Emancipation Proclamation.]

Observations on the slaves and the indented servants, inlisted in the army, and in the navy of the United States. The resolves of Congress, for prohibiting the importation of slaves, demonstrates the consistent zeal of our rulers in the cause of

Immediate emancipation in the West Indies, Aug. 1st, 1838 / painted by Alexr. Rippingille ; engraved by S.H. Gimber

Immediate, not gradual abolition, or, An inquiry into the shortest, safest, and most effectual means of getting rid of West Indian slavery

"Get off the track!" A song for emancipation, sung by The Hutchinsons, . . .

Report of the proceedings of the Anti-Slavery Conference and public meeting, held at Manchester, on the 1st August, 1854, in commemoration of West India emancipation : published under the superintendence of the Committee of the North of England Anti-Slavery and India Reform League

No compromise with slavery : an address delivered in the Broadway Tabernacle, New York, February 14, 1854

A review of the cause and the tendency of the issues between the two sections of the country, with a plan to consolidate the views of the people of the United States in favor of emigration to Liberia, as the initiative to the efforts to transform the present system of labor in the southern states into a free agricultural tenantry, by the respective legislatures, with the support of Congress to make it a national measure

The war and slavery; or, Victory only through emancipation

The Song of the contrabands

Cheap cotton by free labor

The war, and how to end it

Emancipation and the war: compensation essential to peace and civilization ..

A copy of a letter, written to the President of the United States, on slave emancipation: Indiana House, Indianapolis, Ind., Dec. 2, 1854, to His Excellency, Franklin Pierce, President of the United States of North America ; Copy of a letter written from Buffalo, State of N.Y., December 21st, 1860, to the Honorable Abraham Lincoln, President elect, of the United States of North America

Watching waiting for the morning

Uncle Abram, bully for you