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New York & Erie railroad. The great double track, and only broad gauge railroad running west. Through tickets at reduced rates! ... Boston. Farwells & Forrest, Steam Job printers [1856].

Goldthwait's map of the United States, British Provinces, Mexico, Central America, W. India Is. &c., exhibiting the railroads with their distances, single and double tracks and width of gauge.

James A. McDougall and James H. Campbell to Abraham Lincoln, Tuesday, July 15, 1862 (Gauge for Pacific Railroad)

Black Valley railroad! Great central, broad gauge, fast route, from Sippington, through Tippleton and Topersville via Beggars-town, Demonland and Black Valley, to destruction! Accidents by collisions entirely avoided as no trains are run over th

Map of Royal Land Company's railroad (narrow gauge) from their anthracite coal fields to deep water /

Map of the Rio Grande and Pecos Railway showing its connections with the Texas Mexican, Texas Mexican Short Line, Mexican National, Texas & St. Louis, and Denver & Rio Grande Narrow Gauge systems and also the International & Great Northern, Mexican Oriental Interoceanic & International, New York, Texas & Mexican and International & Mex. Standard Gauge roads.

Our standard (gauge) adopted all over the union / Th. Nast.

S.P. Ferguson with gauge which measures snow and hail

S.P. Ferguson with gauge which measures snow and hail

Through the woods on the narrow gauge, Mt. Gretna, Pa.

U.S. Weather Bureau. Snow gauge

U.S. Weather Bureau observes Egypt rain gauge

[Child standing on snow gauge of the Weather Bureau]

Small locomotive used to draw cane cars 2 ft. gauge, India

FORT HUMPHRIES. ARMY POST IN VIRGINIA. NARROW GAUGE ROAD ON RIVER BANK

Electric Institute of Washington, Potomac Electric Power Co. Building. Gauge to measure electricity cost I

Electric Institute of Washington, Potomac Electric Power Co. Building. Gauge to measure electricity cost II

Mr. Heyden Preston. Negative of gauge

Air views of Palestine. Air route over Cana of Galilee, Nazareth, Plain of Sharon, etc. Hills of Samaria near Dothan showing narrow guage [i.e., gauge] railroad

This interesting combination of gauge house and navigation lightpole with service ladders and handrails developed into decorative features is typical of TVA (Tennessee Valley Authority) navigation projects all up and down the river

Plantations in Kenya Colony. Sisal plantation showing loads on narrow gauge R.R. [i.e., railroad]

Plantations in Kenya Colony. Loading sisal on narrow gauge R.R. [i.e., railroad] car

Loading fat lambs on narrow gauge railway for shipment to Denver market. Cimarron, Colorado

Trestle of narrow gauge railroad near Ophir, Colorado

Driving herd of fat lambs into corrals along the narrow gauge railroad. Cimarron, Colorado

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Steel manufacture, Allegheny-Ludlum. This is semi-finished material for finishing in steel mills and strip mills. The piles of rectangular pieces in the foreground are for steel mill production, while the coils behind them are destined for the strip mill where they will be converted into thin gauge strips

Aerial tram leading from mine to loading platform at narrow gauge railway station. Ophir, Colorado

Railroad station of the D.& R.G.W. Railroad at Ouray, Colorado. This narrow gauge line formerly had passenger service but now is confined to freight service

Looking towards the narrow gauge railway station at Ophir, Colorado

Steel manufacture, Allegheny-Ludlum. This sheet mill worker is charging sheets of steel into the heating furnace, from which they will emerge to be rolled into thin gauge sheets

River gauge for water level and bridge across the Mississippi. Memphis, Tennessee

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Loading fat lambs on narrow gauge railway for shipment to Denver market. Cimarron, Colorado

Train coming up the valley on a narrow gauge track, Ouray County, Colorado. Notice the two engines

Narrow gauge railway yards, train and water tank at Telluride, Colorado

Montrose, Colorado, is junction point for standard gauge and narrow gauge railroads and bus lines. Papers and mail are being loaded into bus for transporting to towns along the route

Quadricycle used on narrow gauge railroad. In the early days this took the place of the more modern handcar

Narrow gauge railroad station at Ophir, Colorado

Railroad station and liquor store at Ophir, Colorado. A narrow gauge railway runs into the town with supplies and takes out the ore

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Loading gold ore concentrate into freight cars of narrow gauge railroad, Ouray, Colorado

Loading fat lambs on narrow gauge railway for shipment to Denver market. Cimarron, Colorado

Loading express packages into D. & R.G.W. truck which takes them to points on the narrow gauge railroad where passengers and express service is not otherwise available. Montrose, Colorado

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Caboose of the Rio Grande Southern narrow gauge railway. Telluride, Colorado

Railroad station of the D.& R.G.W. Railroad at Ouray, Colorado. This narrow gauge line formerly had passenger service but now is confined to freight service

Loading fat lambs on narrow gauge railway cars. Cimarron, Colorado

Ruins of old coke ovens and narrow gauge railroad near Meredith, Colorado

Airplane seat production. Each piece of aluminum necessary to the manufacture of airplane pilot seats must be thoroughly checked before being assembled in this large Midwest rubber factory now converted to war production. Should the precision gauge show up the tiniest imperfection in placement or drilling operations, the stamping will be discarded

Flat cars of narrow gauge railroad loaded with logs from the surrounding mountains. Baker County, Oregon

Old station on narrow gauge railroad in ghost mining town. Silver Plume, Colorado

Road leading out of Carlton Tunnel along bed of old narrow gauge railroad on the west side of the Rocky Mountains from Leadville, Colorado

Galvanized sheet steel of 24 gauge is used as corner reinforcement. Screen door construction demonstration. Charles County, La Plata, Maryland

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Elizabeth Almoney who works as a gauge tester at the Animal Trap Company

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Mrs. R.W. (Elizabeth) Almoney, forty-seven (center rear), has had eleven children. She works as a gauge inspector at the Animal Trap Company and on Sunday does the washing. Her husband (left) works in the local chocolate factory. Daughter Arline, twenty (right), who also works at the Animal Trap Company, is cooking Sunday dinner. There are three brothers in the service, and one Boy Scout, age thirteen, in the family

Cass Lake, near Pontiac, Michigan. Karl Axel Westerberg bidding his wife goodbye before leaving for the day's work at the Johansson gauge division of the Ford Motor Company. Karl Westerberg and his son, Eric, built their pleasant home in spare hours after work

Cass Lake, near Pontiac, Michigan. Mrs. Westerberg lighting a match for her husband's pipe as he relaxes after a day at the Johansson gauge division of the Ford Motor Company where he is foreman of the rough stock department

Cass Lake, near Pontiac, Michigan. Mrs. Karl Westerberg pouring her husband an after-dinner cup of coffee after a day at the Ford Motor Company factory where Mr. Westerberg is foreman of the rough stock department of the Johansson gauge division

High school Victory Corps. Bill Wood helps Betty Kemp adjust an oxygen gauge in the welding class at Montgomery Blair High School, Silver Spring, Maryland. Betty is one of four girls in a class of twenty seniors who are preparing to help fill industry's need for skilled welders

Women in war. Machine gun production. Intent on the important job at hand, Elsie M. Terry uses a precision snap gauge on the machine gun part she has milled. One of 2,000 women employed by a Midwest plant, converted from spark plugs to machine gun manufacture, Mrs. Terry typified the American woman war worker. Serious, skilled and reliable, she is making an invaluable contribution to the war effort. A.C. Spark Plugs

Women in industry. Gas mask production. She used to wrap bread in a bakery, before Pearl Harbor, but today twenty-one-year-old Eugenia Bireta is a qualified government inspector who tests gas masks for "eye leakage" on this pressure gauge. She's one of many young women employed by a large Midwest vacuum cleaner company now converted to production of gas masks. Eureka Vacuum, Detroit, Michigan

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Josephine Young gauge inspecting bullets at the Animal Trap Company. She is only sixteen and would not have been allowed to work until the new law was passed

Three-inch A.A. cartridge cases. Antiaircraft cartridge cases must be correct in size. A careful gauge inspection assures precision

Production. 105 mm. howitzers. Adolph Pranewicz of Milwaukee, who has a son in the Marines, checking off rough material with a gauge after the first turning on a lathe of a 105 mm. howitzer at the plant of Chain Belt Company, Milwauke, Wisconsin

Conversion. Copper and brass processing. Intermediate rolling operation on strip. Strip brass and copper, cast as thick heavy cakes, is reduced by successive rolling to lighter gauge sheet, strip, bar, plate, wire or foil. Here's one of the intermediate rolls used in the production of strip. The man is coiling the strip as it comes from the rolls. Chase Copper and Brass Company, Euclid, Ohio

NYA (National Youth Administration) work center, Brooklyn, New York. Two men, white and Negro, who are receiving training in machine shop practice, shown setting up shaper work to cut forty-five degree angles at base for surface gauge

Dearborn, Michigan. Karl Westerberg and his son Eric punching the time clock at the entrance to the Ford Motor Company where Eric is an expert tool and die maker and his father is foreman of the rough stock division of the Johansson gauge division

Aluminum casting. This special gauge checks diameter of the piston skirt. Made of aluminum, this piston will be used in army jeeps, and is one of the products of a large Midwest factory now converted to manufacture of war essentials. Aluminum Industries Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Gauge inspectors at the Animal Trap Company. Right front is Mrs. Julian Bachman, twenty-three, whose husband is in the Army

Conversion. Soft drink dispenser plant. The vice-president of an Eastern manufacturing company now producing war essentials on prime and subcontracts, tests the hardness of steel in a chamber gauge, essential for the manufacture of small arms ammunition. These gauges are made of special alloys tougher and harder than the toughest and hardest steel. Bristol and Martin Company, New York, New York

Conversion. Soft drink dispenser plant. The president of an Eastern manufacturing company now producing war essentials on prime and subcontracts, checks a contour gauge manufactured for Army arsenals. Gauges for measuring cartridges and other war materials must be accurate to the 2/10,000 of an inch to meet ordnance specifications. Bristol and Martin Company, New York, New York

Production. Aircraft engines. She used to be a librarian, now she inspects aircraft parts. Prior to Alma Jean Vincent's employment in a large Midwestern aircraft plant, she managed the junior book section of a suburban library. She had also been an assistant buyer of sportswear, but this lack of industrial experience seems to have been no handicap for her present job of visual gauge operator, inspecting airplane motor parts. With only six months of war work behind her, she's more than meeting plant requirements for speed and precision. Melrose Park, Buick plant

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Women gauge inspectors at the Animal Trap Company of America. The girl at the right is only sixteen and couldn't have worked until a recent law was passed

Superhuman electrical accuracy. Gauging the accuracy of a 155 mm shell by an electrolimit gauge which measures all parts and each curve to the ten-thousandth of an inch. Location: a large eastern arsenal

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Gauge inspectors at the Animal Trap Company. At right is Mrs. Julian Bachman

Detroit, Michigan. Narrow gauge train carrying people around the zoological park

Cass Lake, near Pontiac, Michigan. Karl Axel Westerberg relaxing with the evening paper at his home after a day's work at the Johansson gauge division of the Ford Motor Company, where he is foreman of the rough stock department

Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin. A compression test on a veneer cylinder using an electrical strain gauge. Great pressure is exerted on the cylinder and the resultant strains and stresses are registered by the electrical contacts on its surface. Much experimenting is being done on veneers suitable for use in aircraft

Conversion. Copper and brass processing. This is the inlet end of a conveyor furnace. The rolls of strip brass and copper ride through the furnace on a conveyor, and when the metal comes out the other side it is annealed, and ready to be worked; that is rolled to a thinner gauge, or stamped into cup or shell-shaped products by fabricating plants. Chase Brass and Copper Company, Euclid, Ohio

Dearborn, Michigan. Karl Axel Westerberg and his son, Eric, leaving the plant of the Ford Motor Company where his son is employed as an expert tool and die maker and he is foreman of the rough stock department of the Johansson gauge division. They drive twenty-five miles to and from work in their Ford car

Conversion. Copper and brass processing. This is a stock of semi-finished strip copper in rolls. This metal will be rolled again later, to a thinner gauge. Then it will be cleaned, the edges smoothed and trimmed, and tied into neat coils for shipment. Chase Brass and Copper Company, Euclid, Ohio

Production. Airplane propellers. Frank Geary uses an electro-limit gauge at a Hartford, Connecticut, plant to make final inspections of a three-way hydromatic spider that form part of the mechanism which varies the pitch of airplane propeller blades while planes are in action. At this plant propellers are made with combinations of two, three and four blades

Conversion. Soft drink dispenser plant. Closeup of products now manufactured by an Eastern plant which once made such civilian items as orange juice squeezers, game boards, etc. These objects are far more vital to Uncle Sam. All are different aspects of one production job: a master chamber gauge, a bullet die, and 3-caliber cartridge. Although this company does not actually make cartridges, they produce the gauge and dies essential to cartridge production. Bristol and Martin Company, New York, New York

National Youth Adminstration work center (NYA), Brooklyn, New York. Two men, white and Negro, who are receiving training in machine shop practice, shown setting up shaper work to cut forty-five degree angles at base for surface gauge

Conservation. Glass gauges replacing steel. Colonel H.B. Hambleton, Chief of Army Ordnance's Gage Section explains the virtues of a glass plug gauge to Mr. Thornton Lewis and Brigadier General H.F. Safford (left to right). Glass gauges are lighter and cheaper than steel, permit greater visibility in inspection, are not as much affected by room temperatures and heat of operators' hands, are not corroded by perspiration, need no protection against rusting, do not acquire burrs that would change the effective sizes. They can save the annual use of 250 tons of critical tool steel in government arsenals alone

Conservation. Glass gauges replacing steel. Inspecting a gear with a steel ring, since replaced by a glass gauge at the Frankford Arsenal. Glass gauges are lighter and cheaper than steel, permit greater visibility in inspection, are not as much affected by room temperatures and heat of operators' hands, are not corroded by perspiration, need no protection against rusting, do not acquire burrs that would change the effective sizes. They can save the annual use of 250 tons of critical tool steel in government arsenals alone

Conservation. Glass gauges replacing steel. A steel plug gauge is compared with a glass plug gauge which replaces it at the Frankford Arsenal. A plain ring glass gauge shows in the foreground. Glass gauges are lighter and cheaper than steel, permit greatly visibility in inspection, are not as much affected by room temperatures and heat of operators' hands, are not corroded by perspiration, need no protection against rusting, do not acquire burrs that would change the effective sizes. They can save the annual use of 250 tons of critical tool steel in government arsenals alone

Conservation. Glass gauges replacing steel. Markings are carried on a label pasted on the handle of a glass plug gauge, which replace steel gauges at the Frankford Arsenal. Markings on other gauges are produced by acid etching. Glass gauges are lighter and cheaper than steel, permit greater visibility in inspection, are not as much affected by room temperatures and heat of operators' hands, are not corroded by perspiration, need no protection against rusting, do not acquire burrs that would change the effective sizes. They can save the annual use of 250 tons of critical tool steel in government arsenals alone

Freight operations on the Indiana Harbor Belt railroad between Chicago, Illinois and Hammond, Indiana. The conductor's work desk in the caboose. The dial on the wall is an air pressure gauge

Conservation. Glass gauges replacing steel. A glass ring gauge for the inspection of fuse parts. These gauges are replacing steel gauges at the Frankford Arsenal. Glass gauges are lighter and cheaper than steel, permit greater visibility in inspection, are not as much affected by room temperatures and heat of operators' hands, are not corroded by perspiration, need no protection against rusting, do not acquire burrs that would change the effective sizes. They can save the annual use of 250 tons of critical tool steel in government arsenals alone

Conservation. Glass gauges replacing steel. A steel plug gauge, since replaced by a glass gauge at the Frankford Arsenal, is shown checking an inside diameter of a cartridge case. Glass gauges are lighter and cheaper than steel, permit greater visibility in inspection, are not as much affected by room temperatures and heat of operators' hands, are not corroded by perspiration, need no protection against rusting, do not acquire burrs that would change the effective sizes. They can save the annual use of 250 tons of critical tool steel in government arsenals alone

Conductor (right) and brakeman, in their places in the cupola of the caboose on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad between Argentine and Emporia, Kansas. On the wall between them is the air gauge showing the amount of air brake pressure in the train

Conservation. Glass gauges replacing steel. Glass gauges of various types are replacing steel gauges at the Frankford Arsenal. Left, top to bottom: double-end gauge, "go" plug gauge, ring gauge. Right, top to bottom: "not go" plug gauge, double and solid-handle plug gauge, double-end taper-lock standard, handle plug gauge. Glass gauges are lighter and cheaper than steel, permit greater visibility in inspection, are not as much affected by room temperatures and heat of operators' hands, are not corroded by perspiration, need no protection against rusting, do not acquire burrs that would change the effective sizes. They can save the annual use of 250 tons of critical tool steel in government arsenals alone

New York, New York. Class in the use of precision instruments, part of the government-sponsored industrial training program at New York University. Most of the students are women. Testing the angle of a machined part in degrees and minutes with a five-inch sine bar and vernier height gauge, and consulting a table of constants for a five-inch sine bar

New York, New York. Class in the use of precision instruments, part of the government-sponsored industrial training program at New York University. Most of the students are women. Testing the angle of a machined part in degrees and minutes with a five-inch sine bar and vernier height gauge, and consulting a table of constants for a five-inch sine bar

Conservation. Glass gauges replacing steel. A plain plug glass gauge, which replaces a steel gauge in the Frankford Arsenal, is used to determine the inside diameter of a metal part. Glass gauges are lighter and cheaper than steel, permit greater visibility in inspection, are not as much affected by room temperatures and heat of operators' hands, are not corroded by perspiration, need no protection against rusting, do not acquire burrs that would change the effective sizes. They can save the annual use of 250 tons of critical tool steel in government arsenals alone

Dyna-Empire, 1075 Stewart Ave., Garden City. Gauge