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His majesty's most gracious letter to his government of the Massathusets Colony in New-England ... Printed at Boston in New-England, by Richard Pierce for Benjamin Harris Anno Domini M DC LXXX IX.

[Title page of John Locke, Two Treatises of Government (London, 1690)]

By His Excellency Joseph Dudley Esq. Captain General and Governor in chief, in and over his province of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England a proclamation requiring all persons being in office of authority or government at the of the late Queen

Copy of the fifth & sixth articles of the Treaty of neutrality in America, between England and France, in the year 1686. Late sent in orders to His Majesty’s frigots attending the government of this Province, to be put in Execution to effect. [b

[Arms] By the Honourable James De Lancey, Esq; His Majesty's Lieutenant-Governor, and Commander in chief in and over the Province of New-York, and the territories depending thereon in America, A proclamation. Whereas this government, from a due

Memoirs of the revolution in Bengal, anno Dom. 1757 : by which Meer Jaffeir was raised to the government of that province, together with those of Babar and Orixa, including the motives to this enterprize, the method in which it was accomplished, and the benefits that have accrued from thence to that country, our United Company trading to the East Indies, and to the British nation.

An address to the true-born sons of liberty in the government of the Massachusetts-Bay. [Signed] A Countryman. [1765].

[The provinces of New York, and New Jersey, with part of Pensilvania, and the government's of Trois Rivières, and Montreal:

The mode of elections considered. In Pennsylvania government, the representatives are chosen by ballot; and each elector is furnished with a ticket, by some one or other of the friends, agents, attornies, solicitors, or acquaintances of each can

To the public. As the merchants of this city have nobly refused letting their vessels to the tools of government, for the base purpose of transporting troops and military forces to Boston ... [Signed] The Free citizens. New-York, Sept. 14, 1774.

Whereas I have reason to apprehend that the government of Pennsylvania, in prosecution of their claim to Pittsburg and its dependencies will endeavour to obstruct his Majesty's government ... I have therefore thought proper ... to order and requ

A plan of the island of St. John with the divisions of the counties, parishes, & the lots as granted by government, likewise the soundings round the coast and harbours.

Thomas Jefferson, October 1776, Notes on Bill to Move the Virginia Seat of Government; Capitol; Courthouse

[Title page of "Thoughts on Government" by John Adams, 1776]

In Provincial Congress, New-York, May 31, 1776. Whereas the present government of this Colony by Congress and committees, was instituted while the former government under the crown of Great-Britain existed in full force ... and was intended to e

At a meeting of the freeholders and other inhabitants of Boston, on Monday the 18th of November inst., it was voted, that the following hand bill be printed, and delivered to the inhabitants, for their government in giving in to the committee on

William Fleming to Thomas Jefferson, June 22, 1776, Comment on Proceedings of the Virginia House Committee to Prepare "A Plan of Government"

In observance of the Colony-writ to me directed, these are in the name of the government of the Massachusetts-Bay, to will and require you forthwith to cause the Freeholders and other inhabitants of your town … to assemble at such time and place

In Congress. April 14, 1777. Resolved, That from and after the publication hereof ... [Changes in rules and articles for the better government of the troops.] John Hancock, President. Philadelphia: Printed by John Dunlap, 1777.].

State of Massachusetts-Bay. In the House of representatives. May 5, 1777. That the happiness of mankind depends very much on the form and constitution of government they live under ... [Boston: Printed by Benjamin Edes, 1777].

I [blank] do solemnly swear ... allegiance to his Majesty King George the third my lawful sovereign; and that I will at all risks stand forth in support of his person and government: and I do solemnly disclaim and renounce that unlawful and ini

Virginia General Assembly, May 1779, Bill on Salaries for Government Officials; Written on Fragment of Note from "Mr. Foster"

South-Carolina. By Sir Henry Clinton. Knight of the Bath, General of His Majesty's forces, and Mariot Arbuthnot, Esquire, Vice-admiral of the blue, his Majesty's commissioners to restore peace and good government in the several colonies in rebel

A new plan of the island of Grenada, from the original French survey of Monsieur Pinel; taken in 1763 by order of government, and now published with the addition of English names, alterations of property, and other improvements to the present year 1780;

The surrender of government castle, in March 1782, to the late besieging minority

The late bombardment of government castle / C. Goodnight sculp.

State of New Hampshire. In Committee of safety, April 16th, 1783. A proclamation. Whereas the form of government agreed upon by this state, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy six, was, (considering the then situation

Haerlem, November 21, 1783. State of New-York, ss. By the Council appointed by the Act of the Legislature, entitled, "An act to provide for the temporary government of the southern parts of this state, whenever the enemy shall abandom or shall b

An alarm to the Freemen and electors of Pennsylvania. Friends and countrymen. The day is now approaching on which you are to determine whether Pennsylvania shall enjoy a free and just government or be ruled by the arbitrary wills of a few men wh

United States Congress, March 1, 1784, Printed Resolution on Western Territory Government; with Notations by Thomas Jefferson

The minds of the people being greatly and justly agitated by the apparent intention of the government and the merchants of Great-Britain to deprive the industrious trader of every benefit of our commerce, by the entire monopoly of the same to th

Boston, April 18, 1785. The minds of the people being greatly and justly agitated by the apparent intention of the government and the merchants of Great-Britain to deprive the industrious trader of every benefit of our commerce ... [Boston, 1785

By the United States in Congress assembled, October 12, 1785 : Whereas it is indispensibly necessary, for the support of the federal government, that the states should supply their quotas of money ... Resolved, that the several states be earnestly called on to compleat without delay the whole of their quotas of the requisitions last mentioned ...

George Mason, May 31, 1787. Notes on Representation, State and Federal Government.

Congress of the United States, begun and held at the City of New-York, on Wednesday the fourth of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine. An act for establishing the salaries of the executive officers of government, with their assista

... An act for the government of the Territory of the United States, south of the river Ohio. [New York] Printed by Francis Childs and John Swaine, [1790].

... An act supplemental to the act for establishing the salaries of the executive officers of government with their assistants and clerks. [New York, Printed by Francis Childs and John Swaine, 1790].

... An act in addition to an act, intituled "An act for establishing the salaries of the executive officers of government, with their assistants and clerks. [Philadelphia: Printed by Francis Childs and John Swaine, 1791.].

... An act to amend "An act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States. [Philadelphia: Printed by Francis Childs and Johnn Swaine 1791.].

Plan of the city intended for the permanent seat of the government of t[he] United States : projected agreeable to the direction of the President of the United States, in pursuance of an act of Congress passed the sixteenth day of July, MDCCXC, "establishing the permanent seat on the bank of Potowmac" : [Washington D.C.] /

Plan of the city intended for the permanent seat of the government of t[he] United States : projected agreeable to the direction of the President of the United States, in pursuance of an act of Congress passed the sixteenth day of July, MDCCXC, "establishing the permanent seat on the bank of the Potowmac" : [Washington D.C.] /

Plan of the city intended for the permanent seat of the government of t[he] United States : projected agreeable to the direction of the President of the United States, in pursuance of an act of Congress passed the sixteenth day of July, MDCCXC, "establishing the permanent seat on the bank of the Potowmac" : [Washington D.C.] /

Plan of the city intended for the permanent seat of the government of t[he] United States : projected agreeable to the direction of the President of the United States, in pursuance of an act of Congress passed the sixteenth day of July, MDCCXC, "establishing the permanent seat on the bank of the Potowmac" : [Washington D.C.] /

Plan of the city intended for the permanent seat of the government of t[he] United States : projected agreeable to the direction of the President of the United States, in pursuance of an act of Congress passed the sixteenth day of July, MDCCXC, "establishing the permanent seat on the bank of the Potowmac" : [Washington D.C.] /

Plan of the city intended for the permanent seat of the government of t[he] United States : projected agreeable to the direction of the President of the United States, in pursuance of an act of Congress passed the sixteenth day of July, MDCCXC, "establishing the permanent seat on the bank of the Potowmac" : [Washington D.C.] /

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year MDCCC.

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year MDCCC.

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year MDCCC /

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year MDCCC.

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year MDCCC.

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government after the year MDCCC /

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year MDCCC /

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year MDCCC /

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government after the year MDCCC.

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government after the year MDCCC.

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year MDCCC.

New invented washing-mill made by Josiah G. Pierson No. 10, White-Hall-Street, opposite the Government house ... Directions. New York, October 6, 1792. [New York] T. Greenleaf. print. [1792].

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia, ceded by the States of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of government after the year MDCCC.

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year 1800 /

Plan of the city of Washington in the territory of Columbia : ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America and by them established as the seat of their government, after the year 1800 /

A map of the Tennessee government, formerly part of North Carolina.

Plan of the city of Washington, in the territory of Columbia, ceded by the States of Virginia and Maryland to the United States of America, and by them established as the seat of their government after the year 1800.

... An act to provide some present relief to the officers of government and other citizens who have suffered in their property by the insurgents in the western counties of Pennsylvania. [Followed by] An act for the relief of Angus M'Lean. [Phila

Kauai government survey, 1878 /

Estimate of the expenses of civil government, from the 30th September, 1801 to the 1st October 1802. and of the debts payable.

Proclamation. Executive office. Columbus, Ohio, July 3, 1862. Fellow-citizens. Another appeal to your patriotism has become necessary. The enemies of our government, now assembled at Richmond in hostile array, largely outnumbered any disposable

[Submarine ("Submarine Vessel, Submarine Bombs and Mode of Attack") for the United States government. Water chambers, valves, water passages]

[Submarine ("Submarine Vessel, Submarine Bombs and Mode of Attack") for the United States government. Submarine vessel, longitudinal section]

[Submarine ("Submarine Vessel, Submarine Bombs and Mode of Attack") for the United States government. Vessel under sail and anchored]

Glorious News. Office, Public advertiser. Sunday morning, April 22 1809. Important. Republicans! read and rejoice. The moderate and firm measures of our government have at lengh prevailed. Your Jefferson and your Madison have proved themselves w

Worcester, March 13, 1815. Gentlemen. In congratulating you upon the return of peace with a people whom our government indiscreetly chose to make an enemy, we should most fervently rejoice, could we announce, that the government, and its partiza

Advertising circular noting that cases will be accepted against the government for loss of any property due to military action

A map of the city of Washington in the District of Columbia established as the permanent seat of the government of the United States of America. City map with depiction of "East front of the Capitol of the United States" / by Rt. King, surveyor of the City of Washington.

A map of the city of Washington in the District of Columbia : established as the permanent seat of the government of the United States of America /

To the Senate and House of representatives of the United States. The memorial of the undersigned, citizens of the District of Columbia, respectfully represents ... That in placing themselves under the protection of the General government, they w

Notice to all interested. That at the public sale of non-residenter's r al property in Trenton, on the 5th day of May, 1818, to satisy the direct tax of the general government for the year 1816, I did purchase from General N. Price, Collector ..

Plan of the city of Washington : seat of government of the United States.

Ingratitude has been called the vice of republics. On the late occasion we have seen the Government and people of the United States give a practical and triumphant refutation of this calumny by their conduct to Gen. La Fayette. Another opportuni

Plan of the city of Washington : seat of government of the United States /

The author of the following communication is not influenced by malicious motives. His object is solely to expose, publicly, the mal-conduct of a government officer ... As a suit is now pending in court respecting this transaction, it is hoped th

To the citizens of Washington. A fellew who signs his name William Elliot; he is a clerk in the Patent Office, a foreigner and opposed to this government, has so far degraded himself, that I am compelled to apply to him the epithets that justly

Constitution of the United States. It is an admitted principle among all enlightened politicians, that forms of government, to be either lasting or usefull, must be adapted to the particular circumstances of the nations for which they are intend

"The government." No. 1, [Eye] take the responsibility

By the President of the United States of America. Proclamation. Whereas, a Convention between the Government of the United States of America and her Majesty the Queen Regent, in the name and behalf of Her Catholic Majesty Donna Isabel, the Secon

High places in government like steep rocks only accessible to eagles and reptiles

The debilitated situation of a monarchal government . . .

Virginia Assembly. Resolutions relative to the repayment to Virginia by the government of the United States, of commutation pay, and for a further appropriation of government land to meet the unsatisfied claims of the officers and soldiers of th

Map of the city of Washington in the District of Columbia : established as the permanent seat of the government of the United States of America.

Map of the city of Washington in the District of Columbia : established as the permanent seat of the government of the United States of America /

Map of the city of Washington in the District of Columbia : established as the permanent seat of the government of the United States of America /

The 'destiny' of the United States in the hands of Martin Van Buren! and the friends of the British government rejoice. St. Albans [Vt.] The Messenger Extra. August 27, 1840.

Circular. To the suffrage men of Rhode-Island. Fellow-Citizens. We, whose names are hereto appended, were, and still are, in favor of a constitutional form of government for the State of Rhode-Island ... [1843?].

No annexation of Texas. It having been announced by the government organ that a treaty for the annexation of Texas has been negociated and signed and will soon be presented to the Senate, the undersigned call upon the citizens of New York, witho

State of New Hampshire. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened, that our national government, warned by the overreaching policy and deep publicity of Great Britain in relation to the North Eastern boundary,

Whigs of Rhode Island. The day is approaching when you are to decide the great vital and fundamental principles upon which your State government rests ... [Signed] A Rhode Island farmer [1846].

Map of the city of Washington : established as the permanent seat of the government of the United States of America /

Map of the city of Washington : established as the permanent seat of the government of the United States of America /

Description of the design of the Washington National Monument, to be erected at the seat of the General Government of the United States of America, in honor of "the Father of his Country," and the worthy compatriots of the Revolution. Washington

Map of the city of Washington : established as the permanent seat of the government of the United States of America /

Map of the city of Washington : established as the permanent seat of the government of the United States of America /