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Thomas Jefferson to Charles Gravier, Comte de Vergennes, December 21, 1785, Lister Asquith's Maritime Law Case; William & Catherine (ship)

Thomas Jefferson to Jean Diot & Company, November 24, 1785, Lister Asquith's Maritime Law Case; William & Catherine (ship)

Thomas Jefferson to Borgnis Desbordes, Freres, November 24, 1785, Lister Asquith's Maritime Law Case; William & Catherine (ship); in French

Thomas Jefferson to Borgnis Desbordes, Freres, January 8, 1786, Lister Asquith's Maritime Law Case; William & Catherine (ship); in French

Thomas Jefferson to Ferdinand Grand, March 4, 1786, Lister Asquith's Maritime Law Case; William & Catherine (ship)

Thomas Boylston to Thomas Jefferson, May 1786, Maritime Insurance Premiums

Lister Asquith to Thomas Jefferson, March 20, 1786, Lister Asquith's Maritime Law Case; William & Catherine (ship)

Lister Asquith to Borgnis Desbordes, Freres, January 9, 1786, Lister Asquith's Maritime Law Case; William & Catherine (ship); in French

Thomas Jefferson to Benjamin Putnam, August 8, 1787, Maritime Law Case

[La Heve from the Maritime Boulevard, Havre, France]

[Maritime railway station, Calais, France]

[The Maritime Boulevard, Havre, France]

Wild flowers of Palestine. Maritime squill (Urginea maritima Baker)

Taft parade, Maritime Exchange Div., C.R. Norman, Marshal, New York

[Wild flowers of Palestine. Maritime squiull (Urginea maritima Baker)]

Ligue Maritime française pour le développement de la marine militaire et de la marine marchande reconnue comme établissement d'utilité publique

Maritime Commission. Building of Maritime Commission

Apprentice seamen in the United States Maritime Service manning the yards on the square-rigged training ship "Joseph Conrad"

Apprentice seamen in the United States Maritime Service manning the yards on the square-rigged training ship "Joseph Conrad"

Member of New Maritime Commission, Washington, D.C. Sept. 24. George Landick, Jr., Chief of the Planning Section of the Procurement Division of the Treasury Department, has been named a member of the New Maritime Commission by Preesident Roosevelt. He was born in Indiana but makes his home in Kensington, MD

The United States Maritime Service offers practical training courses for licensed and unlicensed men of the American Merchant Marine / Burroughs ; Halls.

New Maritime Commission acts for first time, Washington, D.C. Sept. 29. The newly created Maritime Commission meeting for the first time today sent telegrams to West Coast shippers and union officials asking that working contract, which expire today, be extended for 60 days in an effort to prevent a maritime tieup. In the photograph, left to right: George Landick, Jr., Rear Admiral Henry A. Wiley, U.S.N., retired named temporarily to the commission in place of Admiral Harry G. Hamlet, who will not take office until after Oct. 1

Member of New Maritime Commission, Washington, D.C. Sept. 24. George Landick, Jr., Chief of the Planning Section of the Procurement Division of the Treasury Department, has been named a member of the New Maritime Commission by Preesident Roosevelt. He was born in Indiana but makes his home in Kensington, MD

Maritime Commission at White House, Washington, D.C., Sept. 30. The members of the newly created Maritime Commission were called to the White House today for their first conference with President Roosevelt. Left to right: Rear Admiral Montgomery Taylor; George Landick, Jr., and Rear Admiral Henry A. Wiley

Assistant Commissioner Maritime Commission, Washington, D.C., Oct. 15. J.M. Chambers, of West Virginia, has just been named Assistant Commissioner of the New Maritime Commission. He was formerly Assistant Chief of the Planning Section of the Procurement Division, U.S. Treasury

New Maritime Commission acts for first time, Washington, D.C. Sept. 29. The newly created Maritime Commission meeting for the first time today sent telegrams to West Coast shippers and union officials asking that working contract, which expire today, be extended for 60 days in an effort to prevent a maritime tieup. In the photograph, left to right: George Landick, Jr., Rear Admiral Henry A. Wiley, U.S.N., retired named temporarily to the commission in place of Admiral Harry G. Hamlet, who will not take office until after Oct. 1

The United States Maritime Service offers practical training courses for licensed and unlicensed men of the American Merchant Marine / Halls.

Member of New Maritime Commission, Washington, D.C. Sept. 24. George Landick, Jr., Chief of the Planning Section of the Procurement Division of the Treasury Department, has been named a member of the New Maritime Commission by Preesident Roosevelt. He was born in Indiana but makes his home in Kensington, MD

American Merchant Seamen increase your professional knowledge and skill in the United States Maritime Service / Halls ; Plattner.

Maritime Commission opens bids for new combination passenger and cargo liner. Washington, D.C., April 1. Taking its first major step toward developing the American Merchant Fleet, the new federal maritime Commission opened bids today for the construction of a combination passenger and cargo liner to replace the S.S. Leviathan in Transatlantic service. The bids were submitted under the 1936 Merchant Marine Act which specifies that plans must include all the latest safety and National defense features. The War and Navy Departments have requested that the Leviathan be retained as a Military Auxiliary. In the photograph, left to right: Commissioner M.M. Taylor; Telfair Knight, Secretary to the Commission; and Rear Admiral H.A. Wiley, Chairman of the Commission, 4/1/1937

Maritime board holds first conference. Washington, D.C., April 16. The Maritime Commission which was just confirmed by the Senate yesterday met this morning for their first conference. This is the permanent Commission. Left to right: Thomas M. Woodward; Edawrd C. Moran, Jr.; Chairman Joseph P. Kennedy; Rear Admirals Henry A. Wiley, and Emory S. Land, 4/16/1937

Permanent Maritime Commission sworn-in. Washington, D.C., April 14. The permanent five-man Maritime Commission as sworn-in this morning after confirmation by the Senate yesterday. Left to right at the ceremony: Thomas M. Woodward of Penna., Edward C. Moran, Jr., of Me., Chairman of the Commission Joseph P. Kennedy, and Rear Admirals Henry A. Wiley and Emory S. Land as they were sworn-in as a group by G.W. Anderson, Chief of the Personnel Section of the U.S. Maritime, 4/16/1937

TAKES OATH AS U.S. ENVOY TO GREAT BRITAIN, WASHINGTON, D.C., FEBRUARY 18. WITH PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT AS AN INTERESTED WITNESS, JOSEPH P. KENNEDY, FORMER U.S. MARITIME COMMISSION CHAIRMAN, TODAY WAS SWORN IN AS U.S. ENVOY TO GREAT BRITAIN BY ASSOCIATE SUPREME COURT JUSTICE STANLEY F. REED. KENNEDY TENDERED HIS RESIGNATION AS MARITIME CHAIRMAN TO PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT JUST BEFORE HE TOOK THE OATH AS ENVOY

Maritime squills in clouds & sky (Absalom's Pillar, etc.)

Ordinary seaman Jackson becomes a D.E.M.S seaman gunner. After a four months' course at a naval training establishment, ordinary seaman Jackson became a seaman gunner on board a merchant ship, a member of the Navy's Defensively Equipped Merchant Ships Service. D.E.M.S gunners and gunners of the Maritime Regiments, soldiers who now serve beside them, have destroyed or damaged 228 enemy aircraft since the beginning of the war. Equipped with a great variety of new weapons and anti-aircraft devices, the D.E.M.S Service has grown from a nucleus of 1,300 men to nearly 20,000 trained seamen gunners and gunslayers. Soldiers originally recruited from the Army as a temporary augmentation, later took the name Maritime Regiments, thus reviving and carrying on the 17th century regiment of that name. Jackson, now a D.E.M.S seaman gunner arrives to join his first ship

Maritime squills in Kedron [i.e., Kidron] Valley. Gethsemane in background

Maritime squills in Kedron [i.e., Kidron] Valley. Gethsemane in background

Maritime squills in Kedron Valley, Gethsemane in background

Maritime squills in clouds & sky (Absalom's Pillar, etc.)

Left to right: Ferdinand Smith, National Secretary, National Maritime Union. He is from New York. Alderman Earl B. Dickerson of Chicago, a member of the President's Committee on Fair Employment Practices; and Donald M. Nelson, Chairman of the War Production Board. These two men came in on an appointment arranged by Phil

Maritime squills in clouds & sky (Absalom's Pillar, etc.)

Seamen in hiring hall, National Maritime Union. New York City, New York

Production Executive Committee. First meeting of Production Executive Committee of the War Production Board (WPB). Charles E. Wilson, President of General Electric Company and WPB Vice Chairman of the Committee. Committee members, left to right: Rear Admiral Howard L. Vickery, Vice Chairman, U.S. Maritime Commission; Lieutenant General Brehon B. Somervell, Commanding General, Services of Supply, U.S. Army; Mr. Wilson; Vice Admiral Samuel M. Robinson, Director of Material and Procurement, U.S. Navy; and Major General Oliver P. Echols, Commanding General, Material Command Headquarters, Army, Air Force

Listing ships in need of sailors. Hiring hall, National Maritime Union. New York City

Launching of 10,000 ton ships. The first of 90 sister ships to be built for the Maritime Commission slides off the dock into the Atlantic. Launched just one year from the time construction work started on the shipyards, this 10,000 ton vessel is of the "Virginia Dare" type. In the future these ships will slide down the runway at the rate of one per week. From laying of keel to launching takes only 90 days

The launching of a 10,000 ton ship. Soon, one a week like this! The third 10,000 ton vessel to be launched from new shipyard on the East coast slides down the ways into the water. From the present one-every-two-weeks schedule, these "Virginia Dare" type vessels will shortly be produced at double speed; 90 ships in 90 weeks is the goal of the Maritime Commission

Launching of 10,000 ton ships. The first of 90 sister ships to be built for the Maritime Commission slides off the dock into the Atlantic. Launched just one year from the time construction work started on the shipyards, this 10,000 ton vessel is of the "Virginia Dare" type. In the future these ships will slide down the runway at the rate of one per week. From laying of keel to launching takes only 90 days

Bits and pieces display. Parts needed by U.S. Maritime Commission being inspected at the first OPM (Office of Production Management) permanent exhibit at which samples of needed defense equipment and parts are shown to prospective producers. The exhibit opened on Tuesday, December 23 in the Boatmen's Bank building in Saint Louis, Missouri. Bits and pieces of needed war goods were exhibited by fourty-eight holders of large war contracts and by the Army, Navy and the U.S. Maritime Commission. It is planned to change the articles displayed in this exhibit as some of them become placed under contracts and subcontracts. Representatives of the Contract Distribution Division will be available regularly to advise manufacturers attending the exhibit. Similar routine exhibits are scheduled to open shortly in other cities throughout the country

Seamen in hiring hall. National Maritime Union, New York City

Bits and pieces display. Parts needed by U.S. Maritime Commission being inspected at the first OPM (Office of Production Management) permanent exhibit at which samples of needed defense equipment and parts are shown to prospective producers. The exhibit opened on Tuesday, December 23 in the Boatmen's Bank building in Saint Louis, Missouri. Bits and pieces of needed war goods were exhibited by fourty-eight holders of large war contracts and by the Army, Navy and the U.S. Maritime Commission. It is planned to change the articles displayed in this exhibit as some of them become placed under contracts and subcontracts. Representatives of the Contract Distribution Division will be available regularly to advise manufacturers attending the exhibit. Similar routine exhibits are scheduled to open shortly in other cities throughout the country

Seamen in hiring hall, National Maritime Union. New York City, New York

Launching of 10,000 ton ships. The first of 90 sister ships to be built for the Maritime Commission slides off the dock into the Atlantic. Launched just one year from the time construction work started on the shipyards, this 10,000 ton vessel is of the "Virginia Dare" type. In the future these ships will slide down the runway at the rate of one per week. From laying of keel to launching takes only 90 days

Launching of 10,000 ton ships. Carolina Shipbuilding Company. One year ago this bustling shipyard was a river bog. Partial view of newly-constructed shipyards on the south-east Atlantic Coast, which are soon to be turning out one 10,000 ton cargo vessel every week for 90 weeks, a goal set by the U.S. Maritime Commission

Seamen in hiring hall, National Maritime Union. New York City, New York

Bits and pieces display. Parts needed by U.S. Maritime Commission being inspected at the first OPM (Office of Personnel Management) permanent exhibit at which samples of needed defense equipment and parts are shown to prospective producers. The exhibit opened on Tuesday, December 23 in the Boatman's Bank Building in St. Louis, Missouri. Bits and pieces of needed war goods were exhibited by fourty-eight holders of large war contracts and by the Army, the Navy, and the U.S. Maritime Commission. It is planned to change the articles displayed in this exhibit as some of them become under contracts or subcontracts. Representatives of the Contract Distribution Division will be available regularly to advise manufacturers attending the exhibits. Similar exhibits are scheduled to open shortly in other cities throughout the country

New York, New York. Listing ships in need of sailors at the Hiring Hall of the National Maritime Union

Launching of 10,000 ton ships. Soon, one a week like this! The third 10,000 ton vessel to be launched from new shipyard on the East coast slides down the ways into the water. From the present one-every-two-weeks schedule, these "Virginia Dare" type vessels will shortly be produced at double speed; 90 ships in 90 weeks is the goal of the Maritime Commission

Conversion. Farm implements to gun parts. A grinding operation is performed on a Bofors gun slide in a converted Midwestern farm implement plant which is also making marine steam cargo winches for the Maritime Commission

Washington, D.C. Under the auspices of the Bureau of University Travel and the National Capital School Visitors' Council, over 200 high school students chosen for their intellectual alertness visited Washington for a week. Students at a motion picture on the United States Coast Guard at the United States Maritime Commission

Conservation. Used typewriter campaign. The War Production Board (WPB) has launched a campaign to secure 600,000 used typewriters from business firms and private individuals. These machines are needed by the Army, Navy, Maritime Commission, Board of Economic Warfare, Lend-Lease and other government departments and agencies. Don MacDonald, Washington, D.C. typewriter dealer, affixes a decalcomania on a machine turned in to the government by John Stockham, Washington, D.C. insurance man. This was one of the first typewriters thus enlisted in the war effort. The decalcomania reads: "Property of U.S. Government - severe penalties for unlawful use"

Conversion. Farm implements to cargo winches. Hobbing five bull gears simultaneously for a plow tractor prior to the conversion of a Midwestern farm implement manufacturer. The machine has since been adapted to cutting gears for cargo winches for the Maritime Commission

Full rigged ship "Joseph Conrad" used for training apprentice seamen of the United States Maritime Service

Trainees in the United States Maritime Service launching a lifeboat

Conversion. Farm implements to cargo winches. Turning an outside cut on the flange of a cargo winch drum for the Maritime Commission. This machine in the converted plant of a Midwestern farm implement manufacturer was used to turn inside cuts on farm tractor wheels

New York, New York. Marine and shipbuilding workers' convention. A friendly word between President Green, and Curran, President of the Maritime Union who was guest speaker

Conversion. Farm implements to gun parts. A milling operation is performed on a Bofors gun slide in a large Midwestern farm implement plant now converted to war production. The plant also makes marine steam cargo winches for the Maritime Commission

Conversion. Farm implements to cargo winches. A steam cargo winch for the Maritime Commission is put under test in a Midwest plant converted from the production of power farming implements

Conservation. Used typewriter campaign. The War Production Board (WPB) has launched a campaign to secure 600,000 used typewriters from business firms and private individuals. These machines are needed by the Army, Navy, Maritime Commission, Board of Economic Warfare, Lend-Lease and other government departments and agencies. John K. Stockham, Washington, D.C. insurance man, turns in one of his typewriters to the government. This is one of the first machines thus enlisted in the war effort

Conversion. Farm implements to cargo winches. Hobbing a gear for a cargo winch for the Maritime Commission. This machine in the converted Midwestern plant of a farm implement manufacturer was used to produce gears for tractors and other farm equipment

Conversion. Farm implements to cargo winches. Steam cargo winches for the Maritime Commission roll off the assembly line of a converted Midwestern plant which formerly produced power farming implements

Conversion. Farm implements to cargo winches. Section of one of the bays of a converted Midwestern farm implement plant now producing steam cargo winches for the Maritime Commission

Fiberglass manufacture, Owens-Corning, Toledo, Ohio. A warp beam of fine fiberglass yarns being put into a loom preparatory to weaving all-glass fabrics used to make electrical insulation, pipe lagging for naval vessels, and industrial service fabrics where high tensile strength, resistance to corrosive vapors, and non-inflammability help improve performance, save weight, and add dependability to vital equipment. Uses and applications of fiberglass materials are covered by many Federal, Army, Navy and Maritime Commission specifications

U.S. Maritime Commission poster. Poster distributed by the U.S. Maritime Commission to U.S. employment offices, hotels, taverns, post offices, labor unions, etc. The original comes in two sizes: 28 1/2 inches by 40 inches, and 14 1/4 inches by 20 inches, and is printed in red, blue, and black on white. Copies may be obtained from Bureau of Public Inquiries, Office of War Information (OWI), 1400 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.

Conservation. Used typewriter campaign. The War Production Board (WPB) has launched a campaign to secure 600,000 used typewriters from business firms and private individuals. These machines are needed by the Army, Navy, Maritime Commission, Board of Economic Warfare, Lend-Lease and other government departments and agencies. John K. Stockham, Washington, D.C. insurance man, turns a machine over to Don MacDonald, Washington, D.C. typewriter dealer, who accepts it on behalf of the government at the fixed rate. This is one of the first typewriters thus enlisted in the war effort

Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, New York. Burner assembly by two members of an engineering class at the United States Maritime Service training dtation. Lieutenant L.M. Breece, USNR, is the instructor

Merchant marine seaman given military funeral. Bearing the casket of Herman Sweitzer, one of the members of the merchant marine who lost his life in the recent ammunition ship-tanker collision off Norfolk. National Maritime Union men march through a Coast Guard color guard as they leave the Sweitzer home, 501 North Monroe Street, Baltimore. This was the first time a military funeral was held for a member of the merchant marine

Hoffman Island, New York. Practical engine training at the United States Maritime Service training station

Saint Petersburg, Florida. Trainees "walking the anchor up" of the training ship "Joseph Conrad" at the United States Maritime Service training station

Saint Petersburg, Florida. Galley of the United States Maritime Service training station

Hoffman Island, New York. Ensign Strong instructing class on the "sperry" gyro compass at the United States Maritime Service training school

Hoffman Island, New York. Trainee sewing canvas at the United States Maritime Service training station

Saint Petersburg, Florida. Biscuits being baked by Bakers school enrollee at the United States Maritime service training station

Hoffman Island, New York. Efficiency contest winners on the march at the United States Maritime Service training station

Hoffman Island, New York. Students at the United States Maritime Service training station

Saint Petersburg, Florida. Bakery school of the United States Maritime Service training station

Hoffman Island, New York. Mess Hall at the United States Maritime Service training station

Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, N.Y. In training for service with merchant vessels apprentice seamen at the new United States Maritime service training station, learn the ropes for the call of "Abandon Ship!" They are practicing letting small boats down from the davits. Superintendant of the station is Commander George W. Wauchope, USNR, for merchant shop master and line executive

Houston, Texas. United States Maritime Commission bus for transporting shipyard workers

Saint Petersburg, Florida. Trainee at the United States Maritime Service training station receiving dental treatment. Robert J. Herder, assistant dental surgeon USPHS-R (United States Public Health Service) ; Dr. J. Walton Lawrence, PA, dental surgeon, USPHS-R

Washington, D.C. (?) Ensign in the U.S. Maritime Service, Reginald Brandon

Bethlehem-Fairfield shipyards, Baltimore, Maryland. Guest speaker, a representative of the Maritime Commission, at a launching ceremony

Hoffman Island, New York. "Bos'n chair class" at the United States Maritime Service training station

Hoffman Island, New York. Splicing an eye in a 12-inch hawser. United States Maritime Service training station

Hoffman Island, New York. Gyro compass and steering class at the United States Maritime Service training station

Saint Petersburg, Florida. Trainee at the United States Maritime Service training station handling a life boat in an abandon ship drill

Sheepshead Bay, New York. Enrollees from all parts of the country shown arriving at the United States Maritime Service training station, the largest of its kind in the world. When dedicated on December 12 the station will have 10,000 apprentice seamen in training for the American Merchant Marine

[Bird's-eye view of landing craft, barrage balloons, and allied troops landing in Normandy, France on D-Day] / U.S. Maritime Commission photo.

Brooms lashed together over roof of Maritime Union Building on W 17 St / World Telegram photo by Al Aumuller.

Wooden ship's figureheads are featured at the Mystic Seaport Maritime Museum in Mystic, Connecticut

Hyde Street Pier, an exhibit at San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park near Fisherman's Wharf, San Francisco, California