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Franklin and Franklin Falls, N.H., Merrimack County, 1884.

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Contoocook, Merrimack County, New Hampshire

Fishing in Hooksett River, New Hampshire

View of Hooksett, New Hampshire

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. An employee of a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill which employs women for most of the work. Lumbering used to be stictly a man's world. Old time lumber men will gape with wonder at the ease with which these women do their small sawmill jobs

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Elizabeth Esty and Florence Drouin, pond woman, use regular logging piles to bring the logs into place on the slip. The timber sawed at this mill is wood felled by the hurricane which hit New England, in September 1938

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, doesn't find her job hard after years of housework. Mrs. De Greenia's husband, Raymond, is a sawyer at Turkey Pond. They have a son in the United States Army somewhere in Australia

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Logs are chained together and hauled up the slip by power-driven cable

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Violet Storey, "take away," getting ready to take the rough board as it comes through the main saw

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. The main saw cutting rough boards from the logs is operated by Raymond Lathrop, sawyer, assisted by Raymond De Greenia, roller. Mr. De Greenia's wife, Dorothy, and also his brother and sister-in-law work here

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Lucy De Greenia putting trimmed edges on a conveyor which takes them through a multiple saw operated by Lionel Belanger, one of the few men employed at Turkey Pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. A break in the work, waiting for minor repairs. Left to right: Mrs. Daisy Perkins, trimmer; Mrs. Lucy DeGreenia, "take- away," and Barbara Webber, edger

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Ruth DeRoche and Norma Webber, eighteen year old "pit-women," relaxing after lunch

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. As a conveyor carries the trimmed boards down past the pit, Norma Webber and Ruth De Rochs, "pit women," take the board off when it is opposite the pile designated for boards of its size

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Barbara Webber, twenty-one year old edger, used to take care of children and has also been a waitress. Her younger sister, Norma, also works at Turkey Pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, doesn't find the job hard after years of houswork. Mrs. De Greenia's husband, Raymond, is a sawyer at Turkey Pond. They have a son in the United States Army somewhere in Australia

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Norman Webber, front, and Ruth De Roche taking the finished boards from the conveyor and piling them according to size in the "pit"

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, pulling out the cable to throw it back down the slip for the next load of logs from the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. The main saw cutting rough boards from the logs is operated by Raymond Lathrop, sawyer, assisted by Raymond De Greenia, roller. Mr. De Greenia's wife, Dorothy, and also his brother and sister-in-law work here

Turkey Pond, New Hampshire. Mrs. Violet Storey "take away" takes the boards as they come from the main saw, at the Turkey Pond sawmill

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Logs are chained together, attached to the cable and pulled up the slip from the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Elizabeth Esty, a pond woman, pushing a log where she wants it with a pike

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Florence Drouin, using a regular logging pike, pushing up onto the slip logs which the pond men have just towed in

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. As a conveyor carries the trimmed boards down past the pit, Norma Webber and Ruth De Rochs, "pit women," take the board off when it is opposite the pile designated for boards of its size

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. William Graf, supervisor of the Turkey Pond sawmill. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill, which employs women for most of the work

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. From left to right: Mrs. Daisy Perkins, trimmer; Norma Webber, pit woman; Mrs. Violet Storey, take-away; Mrs. Elizabeth Esty and Florence Drouin, pond woman; and Mr. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Violet Storey, "take away," lifting one end of a rough board to swing it from the conveyor to the balance where Barbara Webber, right, will take it and put it through the edger. By this system of conveyors and balances, lifting and carrying is kept at a minimum

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. A group of pondmen go the rounds of the government mills rounding up logs that have strayed over the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Freeman and Lucy De Greenia are one of three married couples working at Turkey Pond. Freeman De Greenia works at the "sticking field" where the lumber is stacked and dried. Lucy is one of the "take-aways"

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. The timber sawed at Turkey Pond mill is salvaged from wood felled by the hurricane which hit New England in September 1938. Most of it has been in the pond since 1939. There is enough wood left to keep the mill going two more years

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Elizabeth Esty and Florence Drouin, pond women, use regular logging pikes to bring the logs into place on the slip. The timber sawed at this mill is wood felled by the hurricane which hit New England in September, 1938

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. William Graf, supervisor of the Turkey Pond sawmill. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill, which employs women for most of the work

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Barbara Webber, twenty-one year old edger, used to take care of children and has also been a waitress. Her younger sister, Norma, also works at Turkey Pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. As a board comes away from the edges, Mrs. Lucy DeGreen, right, taking away from the edges and putting them on a conveyor to be sawed into two foot lengths for scrap, while Mrs. Daisy Perkins rolls the edged board over the conveyor in the rear, where the ends are trimmed

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Elizabeth Esty, left, and Florence Drouin, pond women; use regular logging pikes to bring the logs in place on the slip

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Florence Drouin and Mrs. Elizabeth Esty, pond women, use regular logging pikes to bring the logs into place on the slip

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, rolling the logs off the slip to the rack which holds them until the sawer is ready for them

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. A group of pondmen go the rounds of the government mills rounding up logs that have strayed over the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, rolling the logs off the slip to the rack which holds them until the sawer is ready for them

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, operating the power-driven winch which pulls the logs up the slip from the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Violet Storey, "take-away," and Barbara Webber, "edger," sending a log down the conveyor to be sawed into two-foot lengths for scrap

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Rounding up logs on the pond, a job these men do at all the government salvage mills in the vicinity

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Ruth De Roche, eighteen year old "pit woman," used to be a waitress

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Ruth De Roche, eighteen year old "pit woman," resting her head on her lunch pail during the lunch hour

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Florence Drouin and Mrs. Elizabeth Esty, pond women, use regular logging pikes to bring the logs into place on the slip

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. An employee of a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill which employs women for most of the work. Lumbering used to be stictly a man's world. Old time lumber men will gape with wonder at the ease with which these women do their small sawmill jobs

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Barbara Webber, twenty-one year old edger, finds her job harder physically than working in a laundry, but she likes it better because it isn't so tedious and nerve-racking

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Elizabeth Esty, a pond woman, pushing a log where she wants it with a pike

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, shoveling up the slimy bark just peeled off the logs that come up the slip from the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Norma Webber, pit woman, throwing a board on its pile. Boards are heavy but the mill is laid out with a conveyor system so that lifting and carrying is kept at a minimum

Turkey Pond, New Hampshire. Mrs. Violet Storey "take away" takes the boards as they come from the main saw, at the Turkey Pond sawmill

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Employees eating their lunch in a shed. From left to right: Norma Webber, pit woman; Mrs. Violet Storey, take-away; Mrs. Elizabeth Esty, pond woman; Florence Drouin, pond woman; Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Ruth De Roche, pit woman, placing a trimmed board on the proper pile in the pit

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. As a board comes away from the edges, Mrs. Lucy DeGreen, right, taking away from the edges and putting them on a conveyor to be sawed into two foot lengths for scrap, while Mrs. Daisy Perkins rolls the edged board over the conveyor in the rear, where the ends are trimmed

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a United State Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. "The pit," where cut and trimmed lumber is sorted in piles according to size. In the background is part of the mill, and the sawdust pile

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Freeman and Lucy De Greenia are one of three married couples working at Turkey Pond. Freeman De Greenia works at the "sticking field" where the lumber is stacked and dried. Lucy is one of the "take-aways"

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Employees bring their lunch, usually sandwiches and pop or a thermos jug of coffee. The two men at the far left have been rounding up logs on the pond, a job which they do at all the government mills in the vicinity by turns

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Norman Webber, front, and Ruth De Roche taking the finished boards from the conveyor and piling them according to size in the "pit"

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Elizabeth Esty and Florence Drouin, pond women, use regular logging pikes to bring the logs into place on the slip. The timber sawed at this mill is wood felled by the hurricane which hit New England in September, 1938

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Norma Webber, eighteen year old "pit woman," used to work in a laundry. Her older sister, Barbara, also works in the sawmill

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, operating the power-driven winch which pulls the logs up the slip from the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Finished boards, sorted at the "pit," are loaded into the truck by Linwood Perkins, and taken to the "sticking field" to dry. Mr. Perkins' wife, Daisy, also works at the sawmill

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Barbara Webber with a quick eye judges whether the rough wood will make a four, six, eight, ten, or twelve inch board, sets her saw accordingly, and rolls the board through the edger

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Finished boards, sorted at the "pit," are loaded into the truck by Linwood Perkins, and taken to the "sticking field" to dry. Mr. Perkins' wife, Daisy, also works at the sawmill

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. The timber sawed at Turkey Pond mill is salvaged from wood felled by the hurricane which hit New England in September 1938. Most of it has been in the pond since 1939. There is enough wood left to keep the mill going two more years

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. From left to right: Mrs. Daisy Perkins, trimmer; Norma Webber, pit woman; Mrs. Violet Storey, take-away; Mrs. Elizabeth Esty and Florence Drouin, pond woman; and Mr. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. A break in the work comes every once in a while when equipment needs minor repairs or adjustments. Left to right, Barbara and Norma Webber, and Ruth De Roche

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Ruth De Roche, pit woman, placing a trimmed board on the proper pile in the pit

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, operating the power-driven winch which pulls the logs up the slip from the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Violet Storey, "take away," lifting one end of a rough board to swing it from the conveyor to the balance where Barbara Webber, right, will take it and put it through the edger. By this system of conveyors and balances, lifting and carrying is kept at a minimum

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Violet Storey, "takes away," is a farmer's wife with six children

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Norma Webber, pit woman, throwing a board on its pile. Boards are heavy but the mill is laid out with a conveyor system so that lifting and carrying is kept at a minimum

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Lucy De Greenia, who "takes away" from the edger. Her husband, Freeman De Greenia, works in the "sticking field" where the lumber from Turkey Pond is stacked to dry. Her husband, brother and his wife also work at the mill; family groups are encouraged both to make work pleasanter and to simplify the transportation problem

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Elizabeth Esty and Florence Drouin, "pond women," pulling up logs towed in by the men

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. The logs are chained together, atttached to a cable, and pulled up the slip by a power-driven winch

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Barbara Webber with a quick eye judges whether the rough wood will make a four, six, eight, ten, or twelve inch board, sets her saw accordingly, and rolls the board through the edger

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a United State Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. "The pit," where cut and trimmed lumber is sorted in piles according to size. In the background is part of the mill, and the sawdust pile

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Violet Storey, "take away," getting ready to take the rough board as it comes through the main saw

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, operating the power-driven winch which pulls the logs up the slip from the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Logs are chained together, attached to the cable and pulled up the slip from the pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Eighteen year old "pit-woman," Norma Webber, agrees with her sister that sawmill work is harder physically than working in a laundry, but it isn't so tedious, and is easier on the nerves

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Violet Storey, "take-away," and Barbara Webber, "edger," sending a log down the conveyor to be sawed into two-foot lengths for scrap

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Ruth DeRoche and Norma Webber, eighteen year old "pit-women," relaxing after lunch

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Elizabeth Esty rolling logs off the slip toward the main saw

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Lucy De Greenia, who "takes away" from the edger. Her husband, Freeman De Greenia, works in the "sticking field" where the lumber from Turkey Pond is stacked to dry. Her husband, brother and his wife also work at the mill; family groups are encouraged both to make work pleasanter and to simplify the transportation problem

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Lucy De Greenia putting trimmed edges on a conveyor which takes them through a multiple saw operated by Lionel Belanger, one of the few men employed at Turkey Pond

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Norma Webber, eighteen year old "pit woman," used to work in a laundry. Her older sister, Barbara, also works in the sawmill

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Elizabeth Esty pounds hooks into the logs so they can be chained together and pulled up the slip

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Violet Storey, "take-away," brought her sewing along to make full use of her lunch hour. She is a farmer's wife and the mother of six children

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Logs are chained together and hauled up the slip by power-driven cable

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, slip woman, doesn't find her job hard after years of housework. Mrs. De Greenia's husband, Raymond, is a sawyer at Turkey Pond. They have a son in the United States Army somewhere in Australia

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Employees eating their lunch in a shed. In the foreground is Mrs. Daisy Perkins, trimmer. Others, from left to right, Norma Webber, "pit woman"; Mrs. Violet Storey, "take-away"; Mrs. Elizabeth Esty and Florence Drouin, "pond-woman"; Mrs. Dorothy De Greenia, "slip woman"; Ruth De Roche, "pit woman"; Barbara Webber, "edger"; and Mrs. Lucy De Greenia, "take away"

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by a U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. Florence Drouin, using a regular logging pike, pushing up onto the slip logs which the pond men have just towed in

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. Women workers employed by U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. A break in the work comes every once in a while when equipment needs minor repairs or adjustments. Left to right, Barbara and Norma Webber, and Ruth De Roche

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill. The logs are chained together, atttached to a cable, and pulled up the slip by a power-driven winch

Turkey Pond, near Concord, New Hampshire. A U.S. Department of Agriculture timber salvage sawmill, which employs women for most of the work. The main saw cutting rough boards from the logs is operated by Raymond Lathrop, sawyer, right, assisted by Raymond De Greenia, roller. Mr. De Greenia's wife, Dorothy, and also his brother and sister-in-law work here

Merrimack County, New Hampshire /