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View of the new Presbyterian Church in Newark, New Jersey / Anderson del. ; Tiebout sculp.

Map of Newark and East Newark, N.J. from the most authentic surveys

Map of Essex County, New Jersey : with the names of property holders &c. /

Map of the city of Newark, state of New Jersey /

Map of Essex County, New Jersey : from surveys /

Map of Essex County, New Jersey : 1874 /

Holbrook's map of the city of Newark, New Jersey.

Holbrook's map of the city of Newark, New Jersey.

Holbrook's map of the city of Newark, New Jersey.

Holbrook's map of the city of Newark, New Jersey.

Newark, N.J., Harrison-Kearney 1895.

A morning alarm /

Hockey match on the ice /

The ball game /

Some of Newark's small newsboys. Afternoon. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Some of Newark's small newsboys. Afternoon. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Joseph and Rosy, 10 and 8 yrs. old. He sells until evening. She is one of 5 or 6 girls who sell (afternoons) in Newark. Location: Newark, New Jersey / Photo by Lewis W. Hine.

Some of Newark's small newsboys. Afternoon. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Fireman's Ins. Co. Bldg., Broad & Market Sts., Newark, N.J.

Max Schwartz (8 yrs. old) and Jacob Schwartz. 163 Howard St. Newark, N.J. Sell until 10 P.M. sometimes. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Smallest boy is Mike Ferinco. 75 Monroe St., 10 yrs. old. Sells until 8:30 P.M., Newark, N.J. Other is Duar Feriari, 60 Monroe St. Sells until after 9 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Some of Newark's small newsboys. Afternoons. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Eastern League opening game, Rochester - Newark, April 21, 1910

Opening game Eastern League, Rochester - Newark at Newark, N.J., April 21st, 1910

Treasury Dept. Savings Committee, Italian class receiving instructions in English & citizenship, Newark, N.J., Y.M.C.A.

Pretzel and gum vendors - Newsies are good customers. A boy sells a basketful of pretzels every afternoon at the "news" office, to the boys getting their afternoon papers. Henry Schertzer, (left) 14 yrs. old. Abel Schertzer, (right) 12 yrs. old. Sam Tumin, (centre) 10 yrs. old. Sam sells gum, often till 10 P.M. Taken at 8:15 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Some of Newark's "hustlers."See 3226 for small boys in front. 4 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Tom and Jerry, 8 and 9 yrs. respectively. Tom is the "limit" in deportment at school, and Jerry had reputation as a truant until placed in ungraded class. He is in 1.A grade. The greatest sin to him is "being found out." 4 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Theodore Librizzi, 8 yrs. old. Dewey Librizzi, 10 yrs. old. Solomon Milkman, 15 yrs. old. Solomon has been selling 4 yrs. His father is dead. Asked how he liked the trade - "It keeps me in school." Taken at 4:15 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Panoramic view #1 of Newark, N.J.

Eldridge Bernard, 11 yrs. old. Buster Smith, 6 yrs. Old. Route boys of Newark. Colored. Taken at 4 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Joseph Weiss, 11 yrs. Old. Sells until 11 P.M. on Saturdays. Then the Sunday papers come over, and another "crew" comes on. See #3116, 3117. Taken at 11 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Wm. Huber, 12 yrs. old - been selling 4 yrs. Henry Huber, 7 yrs. old, been selling 1 yr. Sell until 9:30 P.M. Taken at 9:30 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Seven years old, Tony - 4:15 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

From left to right. Joe, 12 years, Jacob, 8 years. Bonny, 10 yrs. Levi, 10 yrs. Teacher says Joe doesn't know anything, not even enough to be bad. He is always drowsy in class. "Jacob is "awful" in school work and conduct. He gets sleepy in class. Benny is good in school work and conduct. These three boys are brothers. 4:15 P.M. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Panoramic view #2 of Newark, N.J.

Newark-New Jersey 1916.

Mrs. Margaret B. Laird, 34 Goldsmith Ave., Newark N.J. For four years treasurer N.J. Branch National Woman's Party--member of Contemporary Club Elected to New Jersey Assembly Nov. 1920

N[ew] J[ersey] Headquarters C[ongressional] U[nion].

Mrs. J.A.H. [Alison Turnbull] Hopkins' car in front of N.J. Headquarters, 17 W. Parls Street, Newark. Mrs. Morris B. Mead (South Orange), Chairman of 10 C.D. by car - Miss Agnes F. Campbell, organizer tying on banner.

New Jersey, Newark, Broad & Market Streets

312th Infantry, "Newark's Own", 78th Lightning Division

Department of Labor, training service. Italian class receiving instruction in English and citizenship, Newark, N.J. Y.M.C.A.

Newark women plod in snow to plea for food

Morty [Marty?] Gross using Western Electric headset to listen in on Man in the Moon stories, Ritz Apartments, Newark, N.J.

I found a girl of 13 working at embroidery in a far corner of a dimly lighted room. The light came from a small gas jet which was high above the girl's head, in the center of the room. She was working on a black dress which was outlined in black pencil. For this dress elaborately embroidered, she received ninety cents. She could embroider one dress in about three or four days if she kept at it steadily. She had been working since 4 P.M., and it was the 7 P.M. She expected to stop at 10:30. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Stinging milk tags (See 4916). Location: [Newark], New Jersey.

Of a family of 7 children, all but 2 work stringing tags. The oldest child is 12. The nurse of the school which these children attend, reports that they are continually being sent home because of their dirty condition. A little fellow who looked about 6 was quite an expert. The children received 20 cents for stringing a thousand tage [i.e., tags] - they tie a knot in a piece of string, and run the string thru [sic] the tag. They moisten the ends of their fingers in their mouths to tie the knots. They can string about a thousand tags in half an hour. One member of a second family which is stringing tags has impetigo, or skin disease, according to the school nurse. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

One of the very young shiners at Newark, N.J. - August 1st, 1924. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Charlie, ten year old shiner, Newark, N.J. August 1, 1924. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Mike, ten year old shiner, Newark, N.J. August 1, 1924. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Patsy, an eight year old newsboy, August 1, 1924. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Newsies at work in Newark, N.J. Aug 1, 1924. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Tony, nine year old bootblack, Newark, N.J. says he makes $1 a day. August 1st, 1924. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Eddie and Carmine Zizza, twelve year old twins who make $1.50 a day. They belong to a family of 13 children many of them newsboys. Newark, N.J. - August 1st, 1924. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

Patsy, eight year old newsboy, Newark, N.J. Says he makes fifty cents a day. - Aug. 1, 1924. Location: Newark, New Jersey.

[A photostatic (positive) reproduction of a portion of the pictorial review section of the Newark Sunday Call of December 27, 1931, showing the famous painting of Washington crossing the Delaware River, and a sketch by a Newark Sunday Call artis

Florida Flyer arrives at Newark Airport

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Waiting room, vertical to west

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Market St. entrance

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Main facade from left

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Main facade from left

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Waiting room, morning, to east

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Waiting room, sunlight and passengers

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Platform bridge over Market St.

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Waiting room, vertical to west

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Market St. entrance

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Waiting room, sunlight and passengers

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Platform bridge over Market St

Newark passenger station, Pennsylvania Railroad. Waiting room, morning, to east

Exhibit - WPA Federal Art Gallery, State of New Jersey Opening Nov. 15, Calumet B'l'd'g., 17-19 William St., Newark, N.J.

New Jersey paintings exhibit / IR.

Railroad. Newark, New Jersey

Gardens for the unemployed. Newark, New Jersey. Squatters' houses in "Jersey Meadows," on city dump

Slums. Newark, New Jersey

Gardens for the unemployed. Newark, New Jersey. Squatters' houses in "Jersey Meadows," on city dump

Highway. New Jersey, near Newark

Gardens for the unemployed. Newark, New Jersey. City dump ("Jersey Meadows"). Squatters' houses

Gardens for the unemployed. Newark, New Jersey. Squatters' houses in Jersey Meadows on city dump

Garage mechanic near Newark, N.J. Badge denotes member of Office of Defense Transportation

Fidelity Union Trust Co., 755 Broad St., Newark, New Jersey. Three real estate machines

Fidelity Union Trust Co., 755 Broad St., Newark, New Jersey. Three real estate machines

Vice-President of her local, United Electrical Radio and Machine Workers of America, Congress of Industrial Organization (CIO), Mary achieved the job of forelady by working as a hand at many varied operations. She has made a suggestion to conserve bakelite lamp bases, formerly discarded (a suggestion now in use at the plant), and is also the inventor of an apparatus which prevents short-circuiting during tests of lamps. Mary Petillo, forelady of a Newark, New Jersey factory making lamp bulbs and tubes for the Signal Corps, is an active member of her plant's Labor-Management drive to speed victory. She was elected from a plant personnel of 1700, 350 of them men

Training high school boys to identify planes. Instructor George Bowne of Weequahic High School, Newark, New Jersey, makes silhouette slides for his ceiling projections machine, by which his students learn to distinguish between planes of the United Nations and those of the Axis

Training high school boys to identify planes. There's no question about these young people's ability to recognize airplanes by their silhouettes. They're learning this and other essential facts of aviation at Weequahic High School, Newark, New Jersey, in a course designed to teach students the fundamentals of flying

The labor-management committee of the Titeflex Metal House Company, Newark, New Jersey set up this suggestion box to enlist employee's ideas for stimulating war production. Local and national awards are made for suggestions accepted

Training high school boys to identify planes. If he makes the right contact, this student of Newark's Weequahic High School will hear a loud "buzz." Matching plane names with silhouettes is part of the aviation course offered young people at this school

Training high school boys to identify planes. These high school boys constructed this trainer plane, and the young man holding the stick is operating it. Note the instruments and control board. This is one phase of the aviation course offered boys at the Weequahic High School in Newark, New Jersey

Training high school boys to identify planes. Student's test model planes for accuracy of specification, in a basic aviation course given at Weequahic High School, Newark, New Jersey

Mary Petillo, forelady of a Newark, New Jersey factory making lamp bulbs and tubes for the Signal Corps, is an active member of her plant's laboratory management committee. The committee, set up in cooperation with the War Production Board's drive to speed victory, was elected in Mary's plant from a personnel of 1700, 350 of them men. Vice-president of her local, United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America, Congress of Industrial Organization, Mary achieved the job of forelady by working working as a hand at many varied operations. She has made a suggestion to conserve bakelite lamp bases formerly discarded--a suggestion now in use at the plant--and is also the inventor of an apparatus which prevents short-circuiting during tests of lamps

Edgar W. Heller, residence at 368 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, New Jersey Entrance facade, from left

Edgar W. Heller, residence at 368 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, New Jersey Dining room I

Empty collapsible tubes: a tin mine for war industry. A ladle of almost pure tin, reclaimed from old tooth paste and other metal tubes, is removed from a heating pot for pouring into molds at the Newark, New Jersey, plant of the Tin Salvage Institute. This plant handles about 400,000 pounds of old tubes each month

Edgar W. Heller, residence at 368 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, New Jersey Lieutenant Heller's room

Edgar W. Heller, residence at 368 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, New Jersey Hall, fireplace

Edgar W. Heller, residence at 368 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, New Jersey Entrance facade, from left

Empty collapsible tubes: a tin mine for war industry. Joseph Schoot, age 18, tends a remelting furnace at the Newark, New Jersey, plant of the Tin Salvage Institute. This plant handles about 400,000 pounds of old tooth paste and other metal tubes each month. Note the small stream of tin flowing from the furnace into the channel

Edgar W. Heller, residence at 368 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, New Jersey Powder room, fireplace

Edgar W. Heller, residence at 368 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, New Jersey Library

Edgar W. Heller, residence at 368 Mt. Prospect Ave., Newark, New Jersey Powder room, fireplace

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