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Die Gräfin wickelte den Zindel auf, und siehe, da enthält derselbe jene drei Ringe, welche sie ihrem Sohne Peter mitgegeben hatte, als er sie verliess und in die Ferne zog

Geschichte von der schöenen Magelone und dem Ritter Peter Der Bater sprach: "Ziehe hin, mein Sohn, wie Dein Herz Dich leitet

Lancasterian institute. Having succeeded, by a series of long-continued and personal experiments, in effecting an important improvement in education, I am anxious to extend its knowledge over the Union, that all teachers and parents may share it

[Design drawing for stained glass window with Creation theme: "The genetic nature of Birth; the offshoot having inherited the characteristics of its parents;" and "the Atom"]

"In October" - illustration for "Baby's Lullaby Book ... by Charles Stuart Pratt" showing parents looking in on a child asleep in a bed

Patrick Kieley - age 11 As found half starved by the Society's officers. Face cut and body bruised by inhuman parents.

U.S. Reports: Thompson v. Maxwell Land Grant Co., 168 U.S. 451 (1897)

Cosulich plane -- Marquis Centurione & parents

[Parents and children seated on grass at state fair, St. Paul, Minnesota]

Fairbanks, Pickford and her parents

Farrar and parents

[Old soldier bending over sleeping children by firelight with parents in background]

Dedicated to the American parent by Edward Bok. A roll for educators to ponder over ... A roll for parents to think over ... A roll which speaks for itself ... Reprinted from the Ladies Home Journal for January, 1902. Distributed by the Departme

JOLSON, AL. AL JOLSON'S PARENTS' HOUSE, 4 1/2 ST, NW

LONGWORTH, PAULINA. WITH PARENTS

JOLSON, AL. AL JOLSON'S PARENTS

SAYRE, FRANCIS, JR., BABY. WITH PARENTS

SAYRE, FRANCIS, JR., BABY. WITH PARENTS

McADOO, ELLEN WILSON. WITH PARENTS

[Interior view of Bulloch Hall dining room, scene of marriage of Theodore Roosevelt's parents]

Bulloch Hall dining room, scene of marriage of President Roosevelt's parents

T. A. Wright, Supt. of the Whitnell [sic?] (N.C.) Cotton Mfg. Co. A typical boss,--except hat he was less gruff and suspicious than most. Began mill work at 10 years old. Been at it 18 years. I asked him if he excepts to send his own children to work in the mill. He smiled grimly, " Not if I keep my health, They're going to get an education." He said parents are responsible for so many children in the mills. Father loafs just as soon as children get old enough to work. Dec. 22, 08. Location: Whitnel, North Carolina / Photo by Lewis W. Hine.

Last home of Lincoln's parents near [...], Cole County, Ill. Built in 1831, father died 1851, mother in 1869. Lincoln visited his mother in this cabin [...]

Eugene Bell, House 48 Loray Mill. Said he was 12 years old. (question). "Leastwise that's what mother says." (I am convinced that many children believe they are as old as they say they are,--their parents have misstated their ages so long.) Worked most two years--sweeping. Location: Gastonia, North Carolina.

Eva Boylan (14 years old) Amsterdam Ave. Parents are dead. Eva is supported by an older half sister, who had tuberculosis 3 years ago, but is now cured and working in a pickle factory at 4' a week, has carfare and lunches to pay out of this and board for both of them. Scholarship holder,. Location: New York, New York (State)

Joseph Buonasari, 207 7th Street, Buffalo, N.Y. Second Grade, School #1. 12 years old last summer. Worked on beans and apples and tomatoes in sheds and factory, getting 50 cents a day, sometimes until 8 P.M. Parents sometimes work all night until 5 A.M. Entered School #1, January 11th from School #2. Location: Buffalo, New York (State)

Name: Children from school No. 2 in the Italian district Terrace[?] nr. Genesee St. Many of these children spend their summer vacations in the canning and fruit picking settlements where their parents go to work during the season. Feb. 8, 1910, Buffalo, N.Y. Location: Buffalo, New York (State)

[Children from school No. 2 in the Italian district Terrace[?] nr. GeneSt. Many of these children spend their summer vacations in the canning and fruit picking settlements where their parents go to work during the season. Feb. 8, 1910, Buffalo, N.Y.] Location: Buffalo, New York (State)

[Children from school No. 2 in the Italian district Terrace[?] nr. GeneSt. Many of these children spend their summer vacations in the canning and fruit picking settlements where their parents go to work during the season. Feb. 8, 1910, Buffalo, N.Y.] Location: Buffalo, New York (State)

Dependent (able-bodied) parents. Family of Robert Barnes, E. 15 Magnolia, Miss. Father works irregularly. "I supplies places in the mill when others are gone." Been here two months, Worked a farm near McComb, where the children worked in the mill and went to school. Note how the ages jump from(1) Children not in the mill; who are 2, 5, and 8 years old.to(2) Children in the mill, (front row), said to be 14, 15 and 17 years old. Location: Magnolia, Mississippi.

Shrimp-pickers in Peerless Oyster Co. Photo taken just as they stood. On other side of the shed, still younger children were working. Out of sixty working (only half were there) I counted fifteen apparently under twelve years old. Some three, four, and five years old were picking too. Parents acknowledged ages and fact that they worked some. Boss said they went to work at 3:00 A.M., and would quit about 3 or 4 P.M. Location: Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.

Dependent (able-bodied) Parents. Smith Family, West Point, Miss. Three girls (in front) work in the mill. This boy and others work up town. Came from an Alabama farm six months ago. Smallest spinner runs two sides. "Father just putters around. Don't work steady." "We all like the mill work better'n the hot sun on farm." House barren and run down. Location: West Point, Mississippi.

Dependent Parents (See also 2157) R.L. Witt. He is apparently working on the railroad, but his three oldest children, here work in the Roanoke (Va.) Cotton Mills. Mamie is only 12 years old and earns very little. Home is very poorly kept. Mother would not be in the photo. Location: Roanoke, Virginia.

Batise Joseph. Winchendon. Doffer in Glenakkeb [i.e., Glenallen] Mill. Father and Mother said, "He is 12 years old. Has been doffing all summer. Will go to school." Query: Will he go to school? Another boy, 13 years old, in this mill said, "I'll stay at work until they come after me." Older sister and parents illiterate. Location: Winchendon, Massachusetts.

The Dickerson Family, Dependent Parents. Father (not in photo) works in a machine shop. All except mother and two babes work in the cotton mill, Winona. Mother said, "Father earns good pay. The children all together earn twelve to fourteen dollars a week. Been here two years. Came from the farm, but we couldn't get the children back onto the farm now. They like the mill work." Home was bare and poorly kept. Queries:- Where does the money go? Where is the need for the little ones working?. Location: Winona, Mississippi.

Dependent (able-bodied) Parents. Fries, Va. Family of Albert Senter. He said, "I don't work steady. Have a garden here." Eleven year old Mandy has learned to "spin" by "helping." She said, "They say I'm too little to work steady." Father added, "I guess she'll get in all right in a little while. They've been extra careful, lately, 'cause the inspector's been around, but it'll be easier now for her to get in." The three girls work and Mandy helps, with one eye on a steady job. Location: Fries, Virginia.

Lloyd McAbee and Walter Brown (in front) and the rest of the family except the mother. The parents said they couldn't find the family record, that the boys were 12 and 13 years old. The father works the farm 3 miles away. Sister in the mill. Mother wouldn't be photographed. (See family group 2989 [sic?]). Location: [Spartanburg, South Carolina]

[Accident to young cotton mill worker. Giles Edmund Newsom (Photo October 23rd, 1912), while working in Sanders Spinning Mill, Bessemer City, N.C., August 21st, 1912, a piece of the machine fell on to his foot mashing his toe. This caused him to fall on to a spinning machine and his hand went into unprotected gearing, crushing and tearing out two fingers. He told the Attorney he was 11 years old when it happened. His parents are now trying to make him 13 years old. The school census taken at the time of the accident makes him12 years (parents' statement) and school records say the same. His school teacher thinks that he is 12. His brother (photo 3071) is not yet 11 years old. Both of the boys worked in the mill several months before the accident. His father, (R.L. Newsom) tried to compromise with the Company when he found the boy would receive money and not the parents. The mother tried to blame the boys for getting jobs on their own hook, but she let them work several months. The aunt said "Now he's jes got to where he could be of some help to his ma an' then this happens and he can't never work no more like he oughter."]. Location: [Bessemer, North Carolina].

Accident to young cotton mill worker. Giles Edmund Newsom (Photo October 23rd, 1912) while working in Sanders Spinning Mill, Bessemer City, N.C., August 21st, 1912, a piece of the machine fell on to his foot mashing his toe. This caused him to fall on to a spinning machine and his hand went into the unprotected gearing, crushing and tearing out two fingers. He told the Attorney he was 11 years old when it happened. His parents are now trying to make him 13 years old. The school census taken at the time of the accident makes him12 years (parents' statement) and school records say the same. His school teacher thinks he is 12. His brother (see photo 3071) is not yet 11 years old. Both of the boys worked in the mill several months before the accident. His father, (R.L. Newsom) tried to compromise with the Company when he found the boy would receive the money and not the parents. The mother tried to blame the boys for getting jobs on their own hook, but she let them work several months. The aunt said "Now he's jes got to where he could be of some help to his ma an' then this happens and he can't never work no more like he oughter." Location: Bessemer City, North Carolina.

Accident to young cotton mill worker. Giles Edmund Newsom (Photo October 23rd, 1912), while working in Sanders Spinning Mill, Bessemer City, N.C., August 21st, 1912, a piece of the machine fell on to his foot mashing his toe. This caused him to fall on to a spinning machine and his hand went into unprotected gearing, crushing and tearing out two fingers. He told the Attorney he was 11 years old when it happened. His parents are now trying to make him 13 years old. The school census taken at the time of the accident makes him12 years (parents' statement) and school records say the same. His school teacher thinks that he is 12. His brother (photo 3071) is not yet 11 years old. Both of the boys worked in the mill several months before the accident. His father, (R.L. Newsom) tried to compromise with the Company when he found the boy would receive money and not the parents. The mother tried to blame the boys for getting jobs on their own hook, but she let them work several months. The aunt said "Now he's jes got to where he could be of some help to his ma an' then this happens and he can't never work no more like he oughter." Location: Bessemer, North Carolina

Group of boys in the Belton Cotton Mill. The smallest is Milton Honicutt, 11 years old according to the bible and James Taylor. His parents wouldn't show me the family record. Location: Belton, South Carolina.

Lloyd McAbee been doffing several months in the Spartan Mill, Spartenberg [sic], S.C. His step brother Walter Brown been working for one year. The parents said they couldn't find the family record, that the boys were 12 and 13 years old. The father works the farm 3 miles away. Sister in the mill. Mother wouldn't be photographed. (See family group 2989.) Location: Spartanburg, South Carolina.

Accident to young cotton mill worker. Giles Edmund Newsom (Photo October 23rd, 1912) while working in Sanders Spinning Mill, Bessemer City, N.C., August 21st, 1912, a piece of the machine fell on to his foot mashing his toe. This caused him to fall on to a spinning machine and his hand went into the unprotected gearing, crushing and tearing out two fingers. He told the Attorney he was 11 years old when it happened. His parents are now trying to make him 13 years old. The school census taken at the time of the accident makes him12 years (parents' statement) and school records say the same. His school teacher thinks he is 12. His brother (see photo 3071) is not yet 11 years old. Both of the boys worked in the mill several months before the accident. His father, (R.L. Newsom) tried to compromise with the Company when he found the boy would receive the money and not the parents. The mother tried to blame the boys for getting jobs on their own hook, but she let them work several months. The aunt said "Now he's jes got to where he could be of some help to his ma an' then this happens and he can't never work no more like he oughter." Location: Bessemer City, North Carolina

Accident to young cotton mill worker. Giles Edmund Newsom (Photo October 23rd, 1912), while working in Sanders Spinning Mill, Bessemer City, N.C., August 21st, 1912, a piece of the machine fell on to his foot mashing his toe. This caused him to fall on to a spinning machine and his hand went into unprotected gearing, crushing and tearing out two fingers. He told the Attorney he was 11 years old when it happened. His parents are now trying to make him 13 years old. The school census taken at the time of the accident makes him12 years (parents' statement) and school records say the same. His school teacher thinks that he is 12. His brother (see photo 3071) is not yet 11 years old. Both of the boys worked in the mill several months before the accident. His father, (R.L. Newsom) tried to compromise with the Company when he found the boy would receive money and not the parents. The mother tried to blame the boys for getting jobs on their own hook, but she let them work several months. The aunt said "Now he's jes got to where he could be of some help to his ma an' then this happens and he can't never work no more like he oughter." Location: Bessemer City, North Carolina

Lloyd McAbee been doffing several months in the Spartan Mill, Spartenberg [sic], S. C. His step brother, Walter Brown been working for one year. The parents said they couldn't find the family record, that the boys were 12 and 13 years old. The father works the farm 3 miles away. Sister in the mill. Mother wouldn't be photographed. (See family group 2989.) Location: Spartanburg, South Carolina.

[Noon hour at Massachusetts Mill, Lindale Ga. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found these that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal dozens more. (Hine Report)]. Location: Lindale, Georgia.

Group of workers in Meritas Mill, Columbus, Ga. Could not get the youngest. I went through the mill in the morning and saw some very young workers, and a number of little dinner-toters who were helping. A school teacher told me that the parents count on the children learning to work this way, during the noon, and encourage the people to work at that time, although the nooning is only 30 minutes. Location: Columbus, Georgia.

Noon hour at Mass. Mill, Lindale, Ga. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found those that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal more. (See Hine Report.) Location: Lindale, Georgia.

Noon hour at Massachusetts Mill, Lindale, Ga. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found these that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal dozens or more. (See Hine Report). Location: Lindale, Georgia.

Five year old Willie Hesse. Picks fifteen pounds of cotton a day. Parents own the farm of eighty acres. Near West. Will get ten bales of cotton besides other things. Father and mother and some hired hands work. Farm well kept up. Location: West, Texas.

Noon hour at Massachusetts Mill, Lindale, Ga. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found those that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal more. (See Hine Report). Location: Lindale, Georgia.

Group of workers in Meritas Mill, Columbus, Ga. Could not get the youngest. I went through the mill in the morning and saw some very young workers, and a number of little dinner-toters who were helping. A school teacher told me that the parents count on the children learning to work this way, during the noon, and encourage the people to work at that time, although the nooning is only 30 minutes. Location: Columbus, Georgia.

Noon hour at Massachusetts Mill, Lindale, Ga. During the days following this I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found these that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal dozens more. (See Hine Report). Location: Lindale, Georgia.

Noon hour at Massachusetts Mill, Lindale, Ga. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found those that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal more. (See Hine Report). Location: Lindale, Georgia.

Group of workers in the Massachusetts Mills, Lindale, Ga. Photo taken at noon, April 12, 1913, while they were being paid off. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found these that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal dozens more. (See Hine Report). Location: Lindale, Georgia.

Group of workers in the Massachusetts Mills, Lindale, Ga. Photo taken at noon, April 12, 1913, while they were being paid off. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found these that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal dozens more. (See Hine Report.) Massachusetts Mills, Lindale, Ga. Apr. 12, 1913. Location: Lindale, Georgia / Photo by Lewis W. Hine.

Group of workers in the Massachusetts Mills, Lindale, Ga. Photo taken at noon, April 12, 1913, while they were being paid off. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found these that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal dozens more. (See Hine Report). Location: Lindale, Georgia.

Group of workers in Moritas Mill, Columbus, Ga. Could not get the youngest. I went through the mill in the morning and saw some very young workers, and a number of little dinner toters who were helping. A school teacher told me that the parents count on the children learning to work this way, during the noon and encourage the people to work at that time, although the nooning is only 30 minutes. Location: Columbus, Georgia.

Noon hour at Massachusetts Mill, Lindale, Ga. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found these that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal dozens more. (See Hine Report). Location: Lindale, Georgia.

Noon hour at Massachusetts Mill, Lindale, Ga. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Life Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found these that I could prove to be working now, [or] during the past year at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal dozens more. (See Hine Report). Lindale, Georgia.

Noon hour at Massachusetts Mill, Lindale, Ga. During the days following this, I proved the ages of nearly a dozen of these children, by gaining access to Family Records, Insurance papers, and through conversations with the children and parents, and found these that I could prove to be working now, or during the past year, at 10 and 11 years of age, some of them having begun before they were ten. Further search would reveal dozens or more. (See Hine Report). Lindale, Georgia.

Ollie Allen. Been working in Harriet Cotton Mills 2 years. He is a violation according to both his brother and life insurance policy which say he is 12 years old now. These statements are based on the parents' statement, which is probably high. He appears to be 10 years old, and has been working 2 years. His father and older brother are in the mill. They have a house full of children, and the sanitary conditions are frightful. Location: Henderson, North Carolina.

Charlie and Ollie Allen. Been working in Harriet Cotton Mills 2 years. Charlie is probably of age, but Ollie is a violation according to both his brother and life insurance policy which say he is 12 years old now. These statements are based on the parents' statement, which is probably high. He appears to be 10 years old, and has been working 2 years. His father and older brother are in the mill. They have a house full of children, and the sanitary conditions are frightful. Location: Henderson, North Carolina.

Group of children attending the mill school at Barker Cotton Mills. These children are well-kept at home, and well-directed in school. School is sanitary and well-equipped. School attendance is compulsory. Deputy in mill acts as truant officer. If parents neglect to send children to school, they are requested to move out. The whole situation reflects the good management of the superintendent. Location: Mobile, Alabama.

NATIONAL GUARD OF D.C. CAPT. LOUIS WILSON AND PARENTS

Conrad Helmut's two girls, 6 and 8 yrs. old, pulling beets, near Sterling, Colo. The ground was hard and the little ones tugged away at the beets steadily. There are three smaller children left alone in the shack at the far end of the field. Father said he will clear about $200 this season, -two parents and these two children. Location: Sterling [vicinity], Colorado / Photo by Hine. Oct. 21/15.

Dunbar & Dukate oyster cannery. According to the testimony of a number of the parents and children, this factory reverses the child labor law to suit its own convenience, and probably to avoid detection. Instead of excluding the young children from work before six o'clock according to the law, they let the young children work from four until seven, and then send them home. Location: Biloxi, Mississippi / L.W. Hine.

Benton Hill, a renter, Tinney, Okla. Two other families were helping Mr. Hill and his children pick his cotton. Four adults and 10 children of following ages: 1 boy of 3 years, 2 boys and 1 girl of 5 years, 1 boy and 1 girl of 7 years, 1 boy of 8, 1 boy of 9 years, 1 girl of 11 years and 1 boy of 15 years. Everyone had a sack and was picking industriously. The parents said that Fred, 3 years old, sometimes picks 20 pounds a day and Vera, 5 years old, picks 25 pounds a day. See photos of Fred and Vera. Location: Comanche County, Oklahoma / Lewis W. Hine.

13-year-old boy, Edgar Kitchen, working for Bingham Bros. Dairy. He gets $3 a week; is not working for his own parents. Starts on the wagon at 7 A.M.; works seven days in the week driving the wagon, and on the farm six afternoons. See report. Location: Bowling Green [vicinity], Kentucky / L.W. Hine.

Capps family at Columbia vaudeville. Baby of 21 months (been on stage for 6 months). Girl of 5 years (been on stage for 2 years). Boy of 7 years (been on stage for 1 year). Girl of 8 years (been on stage for 5 years). Boy of 12 years (been on stage for 8 years). Boy of 14 years (been on stage for 9 years). Oldest boy is acrobat, contortionist, etc. All do singing and dancing acts except baby, who appears in final scene as Charlie Chaplin. They appear 3 or 4 times a day--sometimes 7 days in the week, usually coming last on program (as a feature), which means they do not leave dressing room until nearly 11 p.m. Then, in addition, the life in cheap hotels and on the road "making new towns" is very unsettling. It was very touching to see the little ones curled up back of the scenes waiting for their act and getting 40 winks or the mother nursing the baby just before it was poked out onto the stage to do his little "turn." In spite of their stage life, their manners are good. They are quiet, well-appearing children, and the parents are kind and sympathetic. The father acts as nursemaid to the baby, and the mother dresses and changes the others and appears herself. She said: "They're never sick. It's the healthiest kind of life." The 8-year-old girl said: "I don't like it--the men in some places are so rough." There was some familiarity shown to them, but not much. Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan / Lewis W. Hine.

Trudeau Sanitarium, Hachette. Called, Grebouille, a very normal and a very naughty member of the community. Father died, recently, of TB. Naughty but normal is this little child of tubercular parents at Trudeau Sanitarium, Hachette, near Paris. The manor house of Hachette is an AMERICAN RED CROSS hospital for tubercular women. In the grounds nearby barracks have been built where about 180 children are housed, each for a period of three months or more. They are under-nourished children of tubercular tendencies, many of whom have tubercular parents. They are brought from bad living conditions in the cities and the good nourishment and outdoor life at Hachette go far to establish their health permanently

Bridegroom greeting the bride's parents, Chosen (Korea)

Lost but cared for. About thirty children who got lost from their parents during the rush of refugees to leave the doomed city of Novorossisk, in South Russia found themselves well taken care of. They were all gathered together and taken to the Crimea by the American Red Cross on the relief ship Sangammon. This picture shows some to fht children in charge of Lieut. L.M. Foster, of Chicago. Many of the children were restored to their parents after reaching the Crimea, while those whose parents could not be located were taken to the Red Cross colony on the island of Proti where they are being well cared for

Clementine Miller (and her parents) with her sheep exhibit at the 4 H Club Fair, Charleston, W. Va. Location: Charleston, West Virginia / Photo by Lewis W. Hine.

Who's to blame, schools or parents?

Clementine Miller (and her parents) with her sheep exhibit at the 4 H Club Fair, Charleston, W. Va. Location: Charleston, West Virginia.

"Lost in action." Little Gloria Largent was the first youngster to stray away from her parents on the White House lawn today where thousands of Washington children rolled their Easter eggs today. White House officer B.B. Bradley is holding Gloria

[ Gerry Mulligan's parents]

Texas senator's daughter weds. Capital society was out enmasse Saturday to attend the wedding of Janet Sheppard, daughter of the United States Senator from Texas and Mrs. Morris Sheppard. Miss Sheppard became the bride of Richard Lewis Arnold, son of Judge and Mrs. W.H. Arnold, of Texarkana, Texas. The ceremony took place at the home of the bride's parents. In the photograph, left to right: Richard Lewis Arnold; Mrs. Arnold; and Mrs. Morris Sheppard, mother of the bride

Chas. Albert [...] are parents of railroad in his [...] of Durant

Children of drought refugees camped by highway outside of Fresno, California. The parents are working in the cotton field

Shack occupied by parents of Lon Allen. Iron River, Michigan

Parents talking over problems in one of the better homes. Williams County, North Dakota

Grandfather of fifty-six children. Chesnee, South Carolina. He left a 300 acre farm in the North Carolina mountains when his parents died fifty-five years ago. The farm afforded insufficient living and there was no work. He walked forty-five miles to Chesnee where he has lived ever since as a sharecropper

Parents in one of the better homes of Williams County. They are on relief. North Dakota

The parents of seven children. Flood refugees in Tent City, camp near Shawneetown, Illinois

Mr. and Mrs. John Lynch, parents of thirteen children. Near Williston, North Dakota

Corner of dance hall reserved for checking children while parents dance fais-do-do dance. Crowley, Louisiana

Children playing and cutting out pictures from Sears Roebuck catalogue on kitchen floor while their parents prepare dinner for the men on cornshucking day, at home of Mrs. Fred Wilkins. Tallyho, Stem, North Carolina. Granville County. See subregional notes (Odum) November 16, 1939

Playtime in front of migratory packinghouse worker's camp. Child is from Tennessee and his parents are away most of the time. Belle Glade, Florida

Children of migrant packinghouse workers, living in a "lean-to" made of pieces of rusty galvanized tin and burlap. They are left alone all day and often until three a.m. Both parents work when possible. Belle Glade, Florida

Receiving line at Immaculata Junior College. A get-acquainted tea at which students present their parents and friends to members of the faculty was given at Immaculata Junior College today. In the receiving line, left to right - Miss Estelle Flynn, the first guest to arrive, Misses Frances O'Donnell, Virginia Bernaud, Margaret Bier, Anne Marie Burke, and Mary Agnes Bier, 2-12-39

Child of migrant parents sitting on drop bed in trailer home. Weslaco, Texas

Migrant packinghouse worker's home, showing only bed for six people rolled up in the corner. They are from Tennessee. Parents must leave the children alone when both work. Belle Glade, Florida

Child in front of trailer home of migrant parents. Weslaco, Texas. See 32108-D caption

Child with measles in tent home of his migrant parents. Edinburg, Texas

Migrant packinghouse worker's home, showing only bed for six people rolled up in the corner. They are from Tennessee. Parents must leave the children alone when both work. Belle Glade, Florida

Migrant packinghouse laborer's homemade trailer home. Belle Glade, Florida. They are from Pennsylvania, have two children. Both parents work

Children of migrant packing house workers, living in a "lean-to" made of pieces of rusty galvanized tin and burlap. They are left alone all day and often until three a.m. Both parents work when possible. Belle Glade, Florida

Showers for both babies and older children and for parents and complete laundry facilities in the utility building for members of the Osceola migratory labor camp. Belle Glade, Florida

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