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B-n, Dec.8, 1713. To the honourable the Society for prorogating the gospel in foreign parts. The representation and request of the ministers, church wardens and vestry of the Church of England in B---n … [Boston 1713].

To the freeholders and freemen, of the City and County of New-York. Gentlemen. To pretend to prove what cannot be denied, would be wasting time to no purpose ... to request the votes and interests of the freeholders and freemen for John Cruger,

To the inhabitants of the City and County of New-York. The committee appointed by the inhabitants of this City, on the 19th instant at the Coffee-House, for drawing up, and reporting to them, a set of constitutional resolves, do hereby request t

[Request for military provisions, N.Y. May 29, 1775]

Thomas Jefferson to George Washington, July 23, 1779, Request to Send Letter to Mr. Battora in New York under Flag of Truce

Samuel McDowell to Thomas Jefferson, 1779, Request for Revised Bill

Thomas Jefferson to Philip Mazzei, February 16, 1787, Request for Information on Translations; with List of Authors

Ichnography of Charleston, South-Carolina : at the request of Adam Tunno, Esq., for the use of the Phœnix Fire-Company of London, taken from actual survey, 2d August 1788 /

(Circular.) Richmond. January 25, 1794. Gentlemen. It is essentially necessary that all vacancies in the office of Escheator, within this Commonwealth be filled up. I request you will be so good as to recommend to me, without delay, a fit person

A monody on the death of the Hon. Thomas Russell, Esq. sung after the eulogy delivered by Doctor John Warren, in the church in Brattle-Street on Wednesday, May 4, 1796. Written at the request of the several societies of which he was a member. Se

The confession, last words, and dying speech of John Stewart, a native of Ireland. Taken from himself, at his own particular request ... [Signed] John Stewart. Boston jail, April 6, 1797.

(Circular.) In Council, 8th of January, 1798. Gentlemen, My official duty calls upon me to request your particular attention to the law relative to the appointment and duties of sheriffs ... Your most obedient servant. [Signed in Mss.] James Woo

State of New-York. In Senate, August 17th 1798. Ordered that Mr. Foote and Mr. Frey deliver a copy of the resolution, (relative to the proposed amendments to the constitution of the United States) to the Hon. the Assembly and request their concu

Jacob Wagner to Thomas Jefferson, May 10, 1806, Request

To the public. The liberality and promptitude of the Citizens of this State, in attending to my request for information, have already far exceeded my expectations ... [Signed] Horatio G. Spafford. Hudson 1 Mo. 1, 1810.

Notice to the public. At the request of the Executrix of the late Col. William Byrd of Westover, it is thought proper to warn the public against the purchase of supposed titles to lots in the City of Richmond, to which the seller can show no leg

Auditor's office, December 22d, 1820. Dear Sir Agreeably to your request, I have prepared a list of the officers of Virginia, shewing their salaries as now fixed by law, and as they stood in 1814 ... James E. Health, Auditor. [To] Thomas Miller

To the citizens of the U. States. No. I. Friends and fellow citizens. I respectfully request your most serious consideration of a few plain facts, highly important to your vital interests ... You are blest with the capacity of producing one of t

Ode for the canal celebration, written at the request of the printers of New-York. By Mr. Samuel Woodworth, Printer ... The foregoing ode was printed on a moveable stage, on the 4th day of November, 1825 during the procession in honour of the co

Jackson meeting. At the City Hall, this evening, May 24, at half past 7 o'clock. At the request of three hundred citizens of Washington, who approve of the conduct of General Andrew Jackson ... a meeting is invited of such of their fellow-citize

Tippecanoe March 4, 1841. Inauguration ball, the managers request the honor of company at Carusi's Saloon, on Thursday evening, 4th of March, 1841. Baltimore: Murphy [1841].

Justin Butterfield to Abraham Lincoln, Monday, April 10, 1848 (Request for documents)

John Davis to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, March 07, 1849 (Request for Report and Speech)

Washington, August 14, 1852. Sir: In accordance with an invitation from the corporate authorities of this City, and at the request of numerous citizens, Professor Boynton, of New York, will deliver a lecture upon the subject of Phillips' fire an

L. Burlingame to Abraham Lincoln, Saturday, September 24, 1859 (Family legal matters [request by Matilda Moore])

Miss C. L. Angell to Abraham Lincoln, Tuesday, October 16, 1860 (Autograph request)

Hiram Barney to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, April 13, 1860 (Request for services)

D. B. Cooke & Company to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, May 18, 1860 (Telegram; Request to edit speeches)

David Davis to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, May 23, 1860 (Request for letter)

S. E. King to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, February 01, 1861 (Autograph request)

Charles Prince to Abraham Lincoln, Saturday, February 02, 1861 (Autograph request)

Notice! His Excellency Erastus Fairbanks, Governor and commander-in-chief having made the request through the Adjutant General of the state, Company D. 1st regiment. V. V. M., Captain W. Y. W. Ripley will cause a national salute to be fired and

Randolph B. Marcy to George B. McClellan, Tuesday, August 20, 1861 (Request for more troops)

Abraham Lincoln to Winfield Scott, Monday, April 01, 1861 (Request for Scott to submit a daily report)

Jesse L. Williams to Abraham Lincoln, Tuesday, January 29, 1861 (Request for meeting)

Randolph B. Marcy to William H. Seward, Saturday, December 07, 1861 (Request for passport to Virginia)

Charles B. Harris to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, February 01, 1861 (Autograph request)

Charles M. Fuller to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, February 01, 1861 (Autograph request)

G. H. Medill to Lorenzo Thomas, Sunday, July 21, 1861 (Request for more troops at Manassas)

The dying hero's request. By A. Anderson. Tune, as sung to Poor old slave. Harris, Printer, Phila. 1862

Abraham Lincoln to George B. McClellan, Thursday, May 01, 1862 (McClellan's request for Parrott guns)

Abraham Lincoln to Samuel P. Lee, July [4] 1863 (Alexander Stephens' request to pass military lines)

Arthur H. Boreman and A. S. Garretson to Abraham Lincoln, Saturday, October 31, 1863 (Request reply to their letter)

Henry M. Lazelle to Valentine Hitchcock, Wednesday, March 18, 1863 (Request for certificate of commutation)

Thomas M. Howe, et al. to Abraham Lincoln, Sunday, June 14, 1863 (Request martial law be declared in Pittsburgh)

Mayor's office, City Hall, July 8th, 1863. In view of the recent glorious victories of our arms in Pennsylvania, and at Vicksburg, I John B. Romar, Mayor, do hereby recommend and request that all private and public buildings, so far as practicab

George H. Thomas to Robert H. Milroy, Thursday, August 11, 1864 (Milroy's request for a command)

Mattie C. Gifford to Abraham Lincoln, Thursday, January 07, 1864 (Request for autograph)

Oliver P. Morton to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, November 16, 1864 (Telegram in reply to Lincoln's request for election results)

Salmon P. Chase to J. P. M. Epping, Monday, March 14, 1864 (Epping's request for an appointment)

Stephen Miller to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, November 16, 1864 (Telegram in reply to Lincoln's request for election results)

Enoch G. Smith to Abraham Lincoln, Monday, August 15, 1864 (Request for interview)

Andrew Johnson to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, November 18, 1864 (Telegram in reply to Lincoln's request for election results)

Arthur I. Boreman to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, November 16, 1864 (Telegram in reply to Lincoln's request for election results)

Thomas E. Bramlette to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, November 16, 1864 (Telegram in reply to Lincoln's request for election results)

James M. Buford, Sunday, January 10, 1864 (Printed request for information about his brother, General John Buford)

Thomas Carney to Abraham Lincoln, Thursday, November 17, 1864 (Telegram in reply to Lincoln's request for election results)

Frederick F. Low to Abraham Lincoln, Sunday, November 20, 1864 (Telegram in reply to Lincoln's request for election results)

John Brough to Abraham Lincoln, Wednesday, November 16, 1864 (Telegram in reply to Lincoln's request for election results)

William M. Stone to Abraham Lincoln, Friday, November 18, 1864 (Telegram in reply to Lincoln's request for election results)

H. C. Beemer to Abraham Lincoln, Thursday, March 23, 1865 (Autograph request)

James P. Root to Abraham Lincoln, Thursday, March 09, 1865 (Request photograph for Chicago Sanitary Fair)

To the citizens of Groton. The subscribers, appointed by vote of the Town of Groton, April 3d, current, a committee to enforce the laws relating to the keeping and sale of intoxicating liquors in Groton, respectfully request all persons engaged

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. By His Excellency William B. Washburn, Governor: a proclamation for a day of fasting and prayer ... I request the people of Massachusetts thus to observe Thursday, the third day of April next. Abstaining on that da

A foolish request / Keppler.

State of Michigan. Executive department. A proclamation by the Governor. To the people of the State of Michigan, Greeting: Acting under the authority of concurrent resolution No. Ten of the public acts of 1901, I hereby request that Sunday June

The following report contributed by E. H. Fuller of the thirty-second annual reunion of the Survivors Association of the 77th Regiment, New York State volunteers of 1861-1865 held at Hagamans on September 22 [1904], is published by request. [Am

Proclamation for New Mexico day at the World's fair at St. Louis, Missouri ... Whereas, in conformity with a request from the management of the exposition a day was named for "New Mexico Day" by a former proclamation, but later it was found nece

[The goddess of hunting, at the request of Pallas Columbia, accustoms Teddysses to the perils of the chase]

The president, trustees and faculty of Duke University request the honor of your presence at the centennial celebration to be held on the twenty-first, twenty-second and twenty-third of April nineteen hundred and thirty-nine. Durham, North Carol

Photograph of a Jewish Writer, taken at the request of Mr. Barton Blake, with request that we should not use it

Sailors' & Soldiers' Tobacco Fund. It is a significant fact that almost every letter from the front contains a request for "something to smoke" / designed by Frank Brangwyn, A.R.A.

INTER-DEPARTMENTAL COMMITTEE. CONFIDENTIAL COORDINATING COMMITTEE. EACH MEMBER APPOINTED FROM A DEPARTMENT AT REQUEST OF PRESIDENT. SEATED: S.W. STRATTON, CHIEF, BUREAU OF STANDARDS; WILLIAM C. FITTS, ASST. ATTORNEY GENERAL; WILLIAM INGRAHAM, ASST. SEC. OF WAR; L.F. POST, ASST. SEC. OF LABOR; W.S. GIFFORD

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Commissioners of Valley Forge request the honor of your presence at the dedication of The United States Washington memorial arch at Valley Forge on Tuesday June nineteenth nineteen hundred and seventeen at two o

Will Hays appears before Senate Oil Investigating Committee. Will H. Hays, former Chairman of the Republican National Committee and now czar of the movies, testifying before the Senate Teapot Dome Committee at the Capitol today. Hays appeared in answer to the committee's request for an explanation of the $75,000 Republican campaign contribution collected from Harry F. Sinclair

Held in kidnapping. District of Columbia police arrested Jerry Riley, left, in connection with the 1928 kidnapping of Charles Mattler in Detroit, Mich. Riley, according to the police, also is known as Andrew J. Mack, Jerry Riley, Dennis Regan and John Kellly. He was arrested at the request of Detroit officers. Detective Sargent F.J. (Dock?) Cox, standing behind Riley, made the arrest with Detective Sargent J.W. Shimon. Riley refuses to talk, 11/4/35

Time to cut debt, claims Morgenthau. Henry Morgenthau (Sec. of Trans.) appearing as first witness Monday before House Ways & Means Committee session [...] President Roosevelt's request for "tax the rich" revenue. Morgenthau claimed it was time to raise cash to "meet expenses" and to "make substantial reductions in the public debt." The money raised should be used for this purpose, he said, and not for "new government expenditures," 7/8/35

Emissaries of Il Duce. Ambassador Augusto Rosso, left, Italian emissary to the United States, photographed in the Italian Embassy with Count Marohetti di Muriaglio, new Minister to Mexico, who stopped in Washington for a conference on his way to Mexico City. Relations between Italy and Mexico were slightly ruffled last week when a demonstration against Italy's policy in Africa resulted in a request for an apology. Tabiola, the Ambassador's favorite dog, is shown in this picture, 10/8/35

Republican Mayor of Philadelphia tells Chief Executive desire to cooperate, Washington, D.C. Aug.12. Republican Mayor S. Davis Wilson, of Philadelphia, talking to newspapermen at the White House today following a conference with President Roosevelt. At the same time he told President Roosevelt of his desire to cooperate with the administration, Mayor Wilson laid before the Chief Executive a request that Navy construction awards for a battleship, two submarines and destroyer be placed with the Philadelphia Navy Yard. He also asked for a 30 million PWA loan

Sale of Democratic convention handbooks "disgraceful and demoralizing racketeering." Washington, D.C., Aug. 12. House minority leader Bertrand Snell, of New York, leaving the House Rules Committee today after telling members that sales of books on the Democratic National Convention to corporations was "disgraceful and demoralizing political racketeering." Snell's request for a Congressional investigation of the sales was turned down by the Committee, 8/12/1937

Senator New Jersey takes oath of office. Washington, D.C., April 15. Vice President Garner administering the oath of office to United States Senator William H. Smathers, new Democratic member of the upper house from New Jersey. Senator Smathers, who has remained in the State Senate, where he is the Representative of Atlantic County, is assuming his duties in Washington at the special request of Majority Leader Joseph T. Robinson, 4/15/1937

Florida ship canal again brought up. Washington, D.C., Feb. 8. One of the president's favorite projects, the Florida Ship Canal, was the subject of a meeting of the Commerce Committee of the Senate today at the request last week of the President. Senator Claude Pepper, Florida, traces the route of the unfinished canal to Chairman Josiah Bailey, Senator from North Carolina, 2-8-39

Dr. William O(?) Ogus, picture of sculpture at his request. 1832 Eye St., N.W. Home address: Broad[...]Apts.

House-Capitol tunnel may get moving walk. Washington, D.C., Feb. 3. Footsore Congressmen may find succor in their journey from the House office building to the Capitol by proposed installation of a 'moving side-walk'. President Roosevelt made the supplemental request for $200,000 in an appropriation bill sent to the House Wednesday. David Lynn, Capitol Architect made a similar proposal last year. A rail subway between the two offices has been decided to be impractical because of the heavy traffic between House office buildings and the Capitol, 2-3-39

Committee from local chapter of UCAPAWA (United Cannery, Agricultural, Packing, and Allied Workers of America) meeting with FSA (Farm Security Administration) supervisor to request work grants, food or loans for sharecroppers and tenant farmers in the county. Sapulpa, Oklahoma

U.S. forces establish bases in Liberia. This "jeep" is being unloaded at a port in Liberia from a U.S. transport which brought a large contingent of American soldiers, chiefly Negroes, to the African Negro republic under a defense agreement concluded between the two countries at the request of Liberia's President, Edwin Barclay. The Liberian Republic was founded in 1821 by Negro freedmen under American auspices

U.S. forces establish bases in Liberia. Private Napoleon Edward Taylor, first member of the U.S. forces to land in Liberia at the request of the African Negro republic, explains how a sub-machine gun, or "Tommy gun," works. Liberia was originally founded in 1821 by Negro freedmen under American auspices. The American forces, chiefly composed of Negro units, are constructing bridges, improving roads, building air bases and strengthening fortifications throughout the country. Edwin Barclay the Republic's President, welcomed the American soldiers by saying "The future of Liberia is inextricably bound up in the victory of those nations fighting for the Four Freedoms annouced by President Franklin D. Roosevelt."

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Left to right: Churchill and Stalin at the Kremlin

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meeting of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942 at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, U.S.S.R. The meetings lasted four days. Left to right, seated: Churchill, Harriman, Stalin, and Molotov, at the Kremlin

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Left to right, foreground: Molotov and Churchill at Moscow civil airport

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Churchill making address over radio while Russian officials look on at Moscow civil airport. Left to right, foreground: Molotov, Churchill, Harriman

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Picture shows the plane which brought Churchill to Moscow

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Molotov, Churchill, and Harriman review Russian troops at Moscow civil airport. Note new type of jackets Russian soldiers are wearing

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Left to right: Churchill, Stalin, Harriman at the Kremlin, Moscow

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Foreground, left to right: Molotov, Harriman and Churchill at Moscow civil airport. Admiral William Harrison Stanley, American Ambassador to the Soviet Union, is behind Churchill at the right of the picture. British Admiral Miles is saluting behind Harriman

Uncle Sam's nieces. First photographs showing all four women's branches of the armed services in uniform. The photographs have been taken in compliance with a request to show the distinguishing features of each type of uniform and to aid the public in identifying each branch. Left to right: Second Lieutenant Doris Hyde of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, U.S. Army Nurse Corps; Ensign Mary E. Hill of Elizabeth City, North Carolina, U.S. Navy Nurse Corps; Lieutenant Marion R. Enright of Forest Hills, Long Island, New York, of the WAVES (Women Accepted to Voluntary Emergency Service); Lieutenant Alberta M. Holdsworth of Boston, Massachusetts, of the WAACs (Women's Army Auxiliary Corps). The photographs were taken at Washington, D.C.

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Left to right, seated: Churchill, Harriman, Stalin and Molotov at the Kremlin. Unidentified man standing was the interpreter

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Plane which brought Churchill to Moscow

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Left to right, foreground: Molotov greeting Churchill at Moscow civil airport. Man in background is the interpreter

Official pictures of meeting of Stalin, Churchill, Harriman. These are the first official pictures released in the United States of the recent meetings of Premier I.V. Stalin, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Britain; and W. Averrell Harriman, representing President Roosevelt. The three men met in the middle of August, 1942, at the request of the Soviet leader, and held a series of conversations concerned with the future conduct of the war. Also present was V.M. Molotov, Peoples' Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The meetings lasted four days. Left to right: Churchill and Stalin at the Kremlin

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