Library Of Congress
Library Of CongressPublic Domain ArchivePart of PICRYL.com. Not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade

Lima. The Salinas House

Salt works at Salinas

Hacienda Salinas

Hacienda Salinas, moat

Hacienda Salinas, draw bridge

Pump wheel at Salinas

Salinas, California

Salinas lettuce fields. California

Salinas lettuce fields. California

Salinas lettuce fields. California

Salinas lettuce fields. California

Arkansas girl in migrant camp near Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California. This is an Arkansawyers auto camp, filled almost completely with Arkansawyers recently in California. Rent ten dollars per month for one room, iron bed, electric light. (This community is subject of a study by Regional Office, BAE, Land Utilization Division, Berkely, California)

Outskirts of Salinas, California. Rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers

Migrants from the Southwest bring their institutions with them. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California

Salinas Valley, California. Large scale, commercial agriculture. This single California County (Monterey) shipped 20,096 carlots of lettuce in 1934, or forty-five percent of all carlot shipments in the United States. In the same year 73.8 percent of all United States carlot shipments were made from Monterey County, Imperial Valley, California (7,797 carlots) and Maricopa County, Arizona (4,697). Production of lettuce is largely in the hands of a comparatively small number of grower-shippers, many of whom operate in two or all three of these counties. Labor is principally Mexican and Filipino in the fields, and white American in the packing sheds. Many workers follow the harvests from one valley to the other, since plantings are staggered to maintain a fairly even flow of lettuce to the Eastern market throughout the year

Father and son, recent migrants to California, building house in rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers on fringe of town. Salinas, California

Outskirts of Salinas, California. Father and son planting potatoes. These people are lettuce workers, migrants from Southwest

Filipino boys thinning lettuce. Salinas Valley, California

Salinas Valley, California. Large scale, commercial agriculture. This single California County (Monterey) shipped 20,096 carlots of lettuce in 1934, or forty-five percent of all carlot shipments in the United States. In the same year 73.8 percent of all United States carlot shipments were made from Monterey County, Imperial Valley, California (7,797 carlots) and Maricopa County, Arizona (4,697). Production of lettuce is largely in the hands of a comparatively small number of grower-shippers, many of whom operate in two or all three of these Counties. Labor is principally Mexican and Filipino in the fields, and white American in the packing sheds. Many workers follow the harvests from one valley to the other, since plantings are staggered to maintain a fairly even flow of lettuce to the Eastern market throughout the year

Lettuce field near Ontario, Malheur County, Oregon. Lettuce is the most speculative crop in Malheur Valley. It yielded two hundredf and thirty nine dollars per acre in 1939. Yielded so well because lettuce at Salinas, California, froze

Housing for rapidly growing fringe of lettuce workers on edge of town. There houses are built by the occupants, most of them recent migrants from the Southwest. (Subject of BAE) Frequently tents and trailers are on the same lots where houses are under construction. Salinas, California

Arkansawyers auto camp, filled almost completely with Arkansas migrants. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California. Rent ten dollars per month for one room and iron bed and electric light

Housing for rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers on fringe of town, Salinas, California. These houses are built by the occupants, most of them recent migrants from the Southwest

Toilet for ten cabins, men, women and children in auto camp for Arkansawyers, recent migrants to California. Rent for cabins ten dollars a month. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California

Water supply for ten cabins in Arkansawyers auto camp. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California

Outskirts of Salinas, California. Shacks occupied by lettuce shed workers, many from Oklahoma

Farmer who has small plot in rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers on outskirts of Salinas, California

Gang of Filipino boys thinning lettuce. Salinas Valley, California

Father and son building house on outskirts of Salinas, California. Settlement of recently migrated lettuce workers

Cabins which rent for ten dollars a month. Includes iron bed and electric lights. In Arkansawyers auto camp. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California

Outskirts of Salinas, California. Shacks occupied by lettuce shed workers, many from Oklahoma

Grandmother and grandchild. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California. From farm family originally in Missouri, then Iowa. Migrants to California

Housing for rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers on fringes of town. Salinas, California

Outskirts of Salinas, California. Rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers. Family from Oklahoma settling in makeshift dwelling

Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California. An Arkansawyers auto camp filled almost completely with migrants from Arkansas. Rent ten dollars a month for one room, iron bed, electricity. Rough board walls with cracks. This community is subject of a study by BAE Regional Office, Berkeley, California

Salinas Valley, California. Large scale, commercial agriculture. This single California County (Monterey) shipped 20,096 carlots of lettuce in 1934, or forty-five percent of all carlot shipments in the United States. In the same year 73.8 percent of all United States carlot shipments were made from Monterey County, Imperial Valley, California (7,797 carlots) and Maricopa County, Arizona (4,697). Production of lettuce is largely in the hands of a comparatively small number of grower-shippers, many of whom operate in two or all three of these Counties. Labor is principally Mexican and Filipino in the fields, and white American in the packing sheds. Many workers follow the harvests from one valley to the other, since plantings are staggered to maintain a fairly even flow of lettuce to the Eastern markey throughout the year

Salinas Valley, California. Large scale, commercial agriculture. This single California county (Monterey) shipped 20,096 carlots of lettuce in 1934, or forty-five percent of all carlot shipments in the United States. In the same year 73.8 percent of all United States carlot shipments were made from Monterey County, Imperial Valley, California (7,797 carlots) and Maricopa County, Arizona (4,697). Production of lettuce is largely in the hands of a comparatively small number of grower-shippers, many of whom operate in two or all three of these Counties. Labor is principally Mexican and Filipino in the fields, and white American in the packing sheds. Many workers follow the harvests from one valley to the other, since plantings are staggered to maintain a fairly even flow of lettuce to the Eastern markt throughout the year

Gang of Filipino boys thinning lettuce. Salinas, California

Father and son, recent migrants to California, building house in rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers on fringe of town. Salinas, California

Laundry facilities for ten cabins at Arkansawyers auto camp, Salinas Valley, California. Note stove to heat water

Salinas Valley, California. Large scale, commercial agriculture. This single California county (Monterey) shipped 20,096 carlots of lettuce in 1934, or forty-five percent of all carlot shipments in the United States. In the same year 73.8 percent of all United States carlot shipments were made from Monterey County, Imperial Valley, California (7,797 carlots) and Maricopa County, Arizona (4,697). Production of lettuce is largely in the hands of a comparatively small number of grower-shippers, many of whom operate in two or all three of these Counties. Labor is principally Mexican and Filipino in the fields, and white American in the packing sheds. Many workers follow the harvests from one valley to the other, since plantings are staggered to maintain a fairly even flow of lettuce to the Eastern market throughout the year

Outskirts of Salinas, California. Father and son planting potatoes. These people are lettuce workers, migrants from Southwest

Farmer who has small plot in rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers on outskirts of Salinas, California

Gang of Filipino boys thinning lettuce. Salinas, California

Outskirts of Salinas, California. Rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers

Housing for rapidly growing fringe of lettuce workers on edge of town. There houses are built by the occupants, most of them recent migrants from the Southwest. (Subject of BAE) Frequently tents and trailers are on the same lots where houses are under construction. Salinas, California

Migrants from the Southwest bring their institutions with them. Salinas Valley, California

Grandmother and grandchild. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California. From farm family originally in Missouri, then Iowa. Migrants to California

Outskirts of Salinas, California. Rapidly growing settlement of lettuce workers. Family from Oklahoma settling in makeshift dwelling

Gang of Filipino boys thinning lettuce. Salinas Valley, California

Salinas Valley, California. Deputized "vigilantes" armed with clubs guard entrance to lettuce fields during lettuce strike

Arkansawyers auto camp. Ten cabins which rent for ten dollars a month with iron bed and electric light, one room. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California

Mail boxes of lettuce workers. Settlement on outskirts of Salinas, California

Filipino boys thinning lettuce. Salinas Valley, California

Settlement of small plots held mostly by lettuce shed workers, many from Oklahoma. Outskirts of Salinas, California

Rented cabins, ten dollars a month, in vicinity of Arkansawyers auto camp. Greenfield, Salinas Valley, California

Filipino thinning lettuce. Salinas Valley, California

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Laboratory exhibit. This specimen shows the "worms" of rubber on top and tha bagasse settled to the bottom, which is exactly what happens in regular factory operations of rubber extraction

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Digger of seedlings in the guayule nursery

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Transplanting seedlings from the guayule nursery into the field in a demonstration. This machine as well as all others used in cultivation of guayule was designed and built mostly from standard parts at the Salinas farm

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Approximately four-year-old guayule plant. The seedlings remain in the nursery for eight or nine months, the age of the shrub being determined by the length of time it is in the field. Guayule reaches maturity in from four to six years. At maturity the plant is about three feet in height. The rubber content is from eighteen to twenty percent of the dry weight

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Demonstration of digger used in guayule nursery. In actual operations, the tops of the plants are cut off by the mower before they are dug. When transplanted, the guayule seedlings weigh about two grams

Salinas, California. Putting seed into the planter used in guayule nursery of the Intercontinental Rubber Producers

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Guayule nursery. Irrigation pipes are in elevated positions throughout the nursery. While irrigation is required in the nursery, none is needed in the fields

California photographs - Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph.

Salinas, California. International rubber producers. Detail of guayule cultivator

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Harry Baucher, head chemist, works on deresinating tests

Guayule rubber "worms." Salinas, California. In the factory the guayule shrub is put through various choppers and chrushers while mixed with liquids. After being crushed and rolled it goes to settling tanks, where these worms from as the bagasse sink to the bottom. Later the worms are dried and go through the rollers to form a cake of rubber

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Two-year-old guayule shrubs

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Guayule planter. Seeds mixed with sawdust are planted by this machine which also distributes a thin stream of sand over the seeds. This is a nursery operation. Seedlings sprout in a few days, grow in the nursery about eight months before being transplanted into the field

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Guayule "worms"

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Men on the machine are transplanting guayule seedlings into the field. All machines used in guayule culture were designed and built in the company shops, mostly from standard parts

Salinas, California. Interncontinental rubber producers. Demonstration of digger used in guayule nursery. In actual operations, the tops of the plants are cut off by the mower before they are dug. When transplanted, the guayule seedling weighs about two grams

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Approximately four-year-old guayule plant. The seedlings remain in the nursery for eight or nine months, the age of the shrub being determined by the length of time it is in the field. Guayule reaches maturity in from four to six years. At maturity the plant is about three feet in height. The rubber content is from eighteen to twenty percent of the dry weight

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Cultivating two-year-old guayule plants. This is the only place in the world where guayule is now cultivated

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Guayule seedlings in the nursery

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Cultivating two-year-old guayule plants. This is the only place in the world where guayule is now cultivated

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Four-year-old guayule shrubs. Guayule requires from seven to fifteen inches of rainfall annually, ten inches being ideal for successful cultivation

Salinas, California. Putting guayule seed into flats for drying at the Intercontinental Rubber Producers

Weeding the seedbeds at guayule nursery at Salinas, California

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Mower which cuts off tops of guayule seedlings in nursery before transplanting

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Cultivating two-year-old guayule shrubs. For the first two years in the fields the shrubs are cultivated frequently to keep down weeds and break up the soil which crusts easily

Salinas, California. Guayule seed mixed with sawdust coming from planter in nursery of the Intercontinental Rubber Producers

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Harry Baucher, head chemist, runs rubber extraction tests on guayule

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. A machine which digs guayule seedlings in the nursery. After the seedlings are dug, they must be separated by hand before transplanting

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. A sack of seed from selected guayule plants. This selected seed will be used for experimental work in seed propagation to raise shrubs for maximum production

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Demonstration of digger used in guayule nursery. In actual operations, the tops of the plants are cut off by the mower before they are dug. When transplanted, the guayule seedlings weigh about two grams

Salinas, California. Demonstration of combined guayule harvester and chopper at the Intercontinental Rubber Producers

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Gathering guayule seed by means of a vacuum

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Spreading guayule seed in flats for drying

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. A machine which digs guayule seedlings in the nursery. After the seedlings are dug, they must be separated by hand before transplanting

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Digger of seedlings in the guayule nursery

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Demonstration of combined harvester and chopper of guayule. This machine was designed and built by the company

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. This factory can produce 10,000 pounds of rubber from guayule daily

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Men on the machine are transplanting guayule seedlings into the field. All machines used in guayule culture were designed and built in the company shops, mostly from standard parts

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Cultivating guayule shrubs

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Guayule "worms"

Salinas, California. Interncontinental rubber producers. Demonstration of digger used in guayule nursery. In actual operations, the tops of the plants are cut off by the mower before they are dug. When transplanted, the guayule seedling weighs about two grams

Salinas, California. Intercontinental Rubber Producers. Mower which cuts off tops of guayule seedling in the nursery before transplanting into the field

Salinas, California. Guayule planter in the nursery of the Intercontinental Rubber Producers