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[Ornament for the title page of The European magazine showing the goddess Europe shining light on three figures representing America, Africa, and Asia] / Seally script. ; Bayly sculp.

[Charleston, S. C. Hibernian Society membership certificate] / G. Thresher delt. & script. ; A. Anderson.

The day of the wedding comedy in 4 acts

When fortune smiles drama in 4 acts

The stingy man a play

Mileage script group on White House lawn

Pres. Harding signing Mileage Script Bill

Pres. Harding signing Mileage Script Bill

The penthouse studio for radio broadcasts on the roof of the Interior Building consists of reception room, office, script writers' room, small and large studios, and sound control room. These actors are members of the cast for My Dear Mr. President, a play based upon the President's budget message [i.e Interior Secretary's annual report] presented in January 1939 through the channels of the national hookups

Three Thirds of the Nation. Edward Arnold and Glen Ford, stars on War Production Board (WPB) radio program Steel, presented May 6 over Blue Network, look over script during lull in rehersal

"You Can't Do Business With Hitler." Elwood Hoffman writes the script for "You Can't Do Business With Hitler," transcribed radio show whose distribution among radio stations in the United States has jumped from 300 when it was inaugurated in January, t1942. The programs are written by the radio section of the Office of War Information (OWI)

"You Can't Do Business With Hitler." Elwood Hoffman writes the script for "You Can't Do Business With Hitler" radio show, written and produced by the radio section of the Office of War Information (OWI). This series of programs is broadcast by 800 stations in the United States and foreign countries

Off to war! These typewriters, which in the past have recorded scores of screen stories and many of the most memorable scenes in hit motion pictures, are now going to war. Maureen O'Harra put her personal typewriter in with the machines from the script department just before they were turned in by RKO Radio

The stories they've told! Another load of RKO Radio typewriters is turned in to the government for war work. Somewhere in the lot is Maureen O'Harra's personal typewriter which she added to the pile before she would pose in the picture. The machines come from the script department where each one has played its role in recording countless memorable senes for screenplays. Taking time off between the shooting of scenes at the RKO Studios in Hollywood, Miss O'Harra helped collect more than seventy typewriters for future use by the Army, Navy, and Marines

"You Can't Do Business With Hitler." Rehearsing for the radio show "You Can't Do Business With Hitler" are Colonel Charles Ferris, Doris McWhirt, and Virginia Moore at the microphone. In the control room with script and talk-back microphone in hand is Frank Telford, whod directs each production of the series. The programs are written and produced by the radio section of the Office of War Information (OWI)

Mrs. Celeste Avila was born in Chaves, Portugal and has lived in the United States for twenty-one years. She writes all the script for the daily, hour-long programs given in the Portuguese language over station KROW, Oakland, California. She says about her radio work: "It has been a very great pleasure and satisfaction to be a part of a project which serves to make the people of Portuguese blood better citizens of this country. In this work, I, of course, have many contacts with the Portuguese and I know of their deep satisfaction at becoming an integral part of the U.S.

Chicago, Illinois. Good Sheperd Community Center. Two of the actors with Mr. Langston Hughes discussing the script of a new play during rehearsal

Off to war! These typewriters, which in the past have recorded scores of screen stories and many of the most memorable scenes in hit motion pictures, are now going to war. Maureen O'Harra put her personal typewriter in with the machines from the script department just before they were turned in by RKO Radio

The stories they've told! Another load of RKO Radio typewriters is turned in to the government for war work. Somewhere in the lot is Maureen O'Harra's personal typewriter which she added to the pile before she would pose in the picture. The machines come from the script department where each one has played its role in recording countless memorable senes for screenplays. Taking time off between the shooting of scenes at the RKO Studios in Hollywood, Miss O'Harra helped collect more than seventy typewriters for future use by the Army, Navy, and Marines

The stories they've told! Another load of RKO Radio typewriters is turned in to the government for war work. Somewhere in the lot is Maureen O'Harra's personal typewriter which she added to the pile before she would pose in the picture. The machines come from the script department where each one has played its role in recording countless memorable senes for screenplays. Taking time off between the shooting of scenes at the RKO Studios in Hollywood, Miss O'Harra helped collect more than seventy typewriters for future use by the Army, Navy, and Marines

The stories they've told! Another load of RKO Radio typewriters is turned in to the government for war work. Somewhere in the lot is Maureen O'Harra's personal typewriter which she added to the pile before she would pose in the picture. The machines come from the script department where each one has played its role in recording countless memorable senes for screenplays. Taking time off between the shooting of scenes at the RKO Studios in Hollywood, Miss O'Harra helped collect more than seventy typewriters for future use by the Army, Navy, and Marines

"You Can't Do Business With Hitler." Rehearsal is underway for "You Can't Do Business With Hitler," the radio show written and produced by the radio section of the Office of War Information (OWI). At the microphone are (left to right) Colonel Charles Ferris, Doris McWhirt, Virginia Moore. In the control room with script and talkback microphhone in hand is Frank Telford, whio directs each production

Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Sergeant Bianco working on a radio script. He is in charge of Fort Belvoir radio shows

Orlando, Florida. Wings over Jordan, a popular Sunday morning radio program broadcast by Columbia Broadcasting System from station WDBO. Rev. Glenn T. Settles, founder and narrator of the program, going over his script

Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Sergeant Bianco working on a radio script. He is in charge of Fort Belvoir radio shows

Office of War Information news bureau. Chief of the Foreign Desk, Kenneth Stewart heads the OWI staff which gathers news of wartime Washington for use by the Overseas Division in New York and San Francisco. News sent from Washington, queries answered here, find their way into shortwave broadcasts to occupied lands; pamphlets and leaflets dropped on hostile towns and villages; cables carrying news of America to our friends and allies. Achilles Sakell talks over a script for the Balkan countries with Stewart

Mr. Neil Simon, author, sitting on windowsill at home pouring over a script of play he wrote / World Telegram & Sun photo by Al Ravenna.

Polynesian Scenario

[ 30-Second Radio Spot of Danny Kaye - GENERAL UNICEF]

[ 30-Second Radio Spot of Danny Kaye - NATIONAL UNICEF DAY]

Spies

Happy Times [Film Script]

Great Catherine

Schnitzelbank

Happy Times [Film Script]

Happy Times [Film Script]

[ Cast list for Danny Kaye's "Look-Ins at the Met"]

Ring Up The Curtains

Great Catherine

[ 30-Second Radio Spot of Danny Kaye - UNICEF Greeting Card]

Happy Times [Film Script]

Who Am I?

[ Speech given by Danny Kaye to the American College of Cardiology]

Timing [script for Appalachian spring, 29 May 1943]

A monologue entitled A last resort

A monologue entitled A last resort

A monologue entitled A last resort

A monologue entitled A last resort

A monologue entitled A last resort

A monologue entitled A last resort

A monologue entitled A last resort

1 act comedy sketch entitled April first

1 act comedy sketch entitled April first

1 act comedy sketch entitled April first

1 act comedy sketch entitled April first

1 act comedy sketch entitled April first

1 act comedy sketch entitled April first

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

Back from the land of the nut a monologue

The model and the freshman a playlet in one scene and one act

The model and the freshman a playlet in one scene and one act

The model and the freshman a playlet in one scene and one act

The model and the freshman a playlet in one scene and one act

The model and the freshman a playlet in one scene and one act

The model and the freshman a playlet in one scene and one act

Library Of Congress

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