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Overland Flights for New England; and Battleships to Repel Attacks from the Skies [New York American, 13 August 1911]

School with children's sleds and skies parked outside Center Sandwich, New Hampshire

National Paint, Varnish & Lacquer Association Inc. Exhibit in Statler Hotel with Paint fights in the skies display

Archbishop Francis J. Spellman of New York, on his recent tour of North African battlefronts, said mass for the men at the Fifty-seventh Fighter Group of the United States Army Ninth Air Force. This Air Force group is located "somewhere in Tunisia" and they are the boys who scored the biggest victory in the history of aviation, knocking almost 100 Axis transports and fighters out of the skies on one engagement. The archbishop held mass in a plane revetment at the Fifty-Seventh fighter base. The altar was set up and mass held on the spot. He said mass whenever and wherever there were boys who were interested in hearing one. Attendants at the mass were Major C.H. Logue, Catholic priest from Cleveland, Ohio, and Capptain J.E. McCarrity, Paulist priest from New York City and Air Force chaplain. They are seen in some of the pictures

Langley Field, Virginia. YB-17 bombardment squadron. Two members of a ground crew at Langley Field, Virginia services one of the four powerful engines of a YB-17 bomber. The huge engine nacelle and landing wheel give some idea of the masiveness of this warship of the skies

Fort Benning paratroopers. Infantrymen of the skies in training at Fort Benning, Georgia. These paratroopers, who perform many important military duties, know some tricks the Axis won't like

Langley Field, Virginia. YB-17 bombardment squadron. A warship of the skies takes on a load of fuel. Two corporals of a bombardment squadron at Langley Field, Virginia fill the gas tanks of a huge YB-17 bomber just before takeoff

Fort Benning paratroopers. One of the toughest of American soldiers is the paratrooper, a man who touches ground fighting These infantrymen of the skies in training at Fort Benning, Georgia will perform many important chores for the Army

Production. Pratt and Whitney airplane engines. Master piston-rod forgings for Pratt and Whitney airplane engines are carefully inspected in a large plant now producing motors to drive Uncle Sam's warships of the skies. Pratt and Whitney Aircraft

Archbishop Francis J. Spellman of New York, on his recent tour of North African battlefronts, said mass for the men at the Fifty-seventh Fighter Group of the United States Army Ninth Air Force. This Air Force group is located "somewhere in Tunisia" and they are the boys who scored the biggest victory in the history of aviation, knocking almost 100 Axis transports and fighters out of the skies on one engagement. The archbishop held mass in a plane revetment at the Fifty-Seventh fighter base. The altar was set up and mass held on the spot. He said mass whenever and wherever there were boys who were interested in hearing one. Attendants at the mass were Major C.H. Logue, Catholic priest from Cleveland, Ohio, and Capptain J.E. McCarrity, Paulist priest from New York City and Air Force chaplain. They are seen in some of the pictures

Langley Field, Virginia. YB-17 bombardment squadron. The men who keep them flying are proud of Uncle Sam's new warships of the skies. A master sergeant of a bombardment squadron at Langley Field, Virginia turns a fond but critical eye on one of the four powerful motors of a giant YB-17 bomber

Fort Benning paratroopers. Paratroopers take only a one-way ride. These soldiers of the skies in training at Fort Benning, Georgia prepare for a flight to an objective which they will reach with precision

Fort Benning paratroopers. The infantry of the skies. Paratroopers in training at Fort Benning, Georgia on their way to Earth to perform precise missions that will prepare them for the real tasks of war

Officers of the 57th Fighter group United States Army Air Force, look over the ruins of a Roman coliseum in Tunisia. These are a few of our airmen who knocked Nazi planes out of the skies above Sicily Straits and are now getting their birdeye's of Italy, itself

Fort Benning paratroopers. Among the Army's best utility men are the paratroopers. The soldier of the skies, all set to bail out above Fort Benning, Georgia, leaps into quick effective action as soon as he reaches his objective

Archbishop Francis J. Spellman of New York, on his recent tour of North African battlefronts, said mass for the men at the Fifty-seventh Fighter Group of the United States Army Ninth Air Force. This Air Force group is located "somewhere in Tunisia" and they are the boys who scored the biggest victory in the history of aviation, knocking almost 100 Axis transports and fighters out of the skies on one engagement. The archbishop held mass in a plane revetment at the Fifty-Seventh fighter base. The altar was set up and mass held on the spot. He said mass whenever and wherever there were boys who were interested in hearing one. Attendants at the mass were Major C.H. Logue, Catholic priest from Cleveland, Ohio, and Capptain J.E. McCarrity, Paulist priest from New York City and Air Force chaplain. They are seen in some of the pictures

Exterminators lived up to their name. Lieutenant John Stefanik (left) of Chicopee, Massachusetts, and Lieutenant Charles Leaf, of South Orange, New Jersey, display the insignia of their Sixty-Sixth Squadron, one of the units of the Fifty-Seventh Fighter Group, United States Air Force. When the Fifty-Seventh knocked seventy-four Axis planes out of the skies in one air battle, the Exterminators accounted for more that twenty-five

Fort Benning paratroopers. Infantrymen of the skies in training at Fort Benning, Georgia. These paratroopers, who perform many important military duties, know some tricks the Axis won't like

Fort Benning paratroopers. Among the Army's best utility men are the paratroopers. The soldier of the skies, all set to bail out above Fort Benning, Georgia, leaps into quick effective action as soon as he reaches his objective

Fort Benning paratroopers. Among the Army's best utility men are the paratroopers. The soldier of the skies, all set to bail out above Fort Benning, Georgia, leaps into quick effective action as soon as he reaches his objective

Archbishop Francis J. Spellman of New York, on his recent tour of North African battlefronts, said mass for the men at the Fifty-seventh Fighter Group of the United States Army Ninth Air Force. This Air Force group is located "somewhere in Tunisia" and they are the boys who scored the biggest victory in the history of aviation, knocking almost 100 Axis transports and fighters out of the skies on one engagement. The archbishop held mass in a plane revetment at the Fifty-Seventh fighter base. The altar was set up and mass held on the spot. He said mass whenever and wherever there were boys who were interested in hearing one. Attendants at the mass were Major C.H. Logue, Catholic priest from Cleveland, Ohio, and Capptain J.E. McCarrity, Paulist priest from New York City and Air Force chaplain. They are seen in some of the pictures

Fort Benning paratroopers. Among the Army's best utility men are the paratroopers. The soldier of the skies, all set to bail out above Fort Benning, Georgia, leaps into quick effective action as soon as he reaches his objective

Fort Benning paratroopers. Infantrymen of the skies in training at Fort Benning, Georgia. These paratroopers, who perform many important military duties, know some tricks the Axis won't like

Langley Field, Virginia. YB-17 bombardment squadron. A combat crew of one of our mighty YB-17 bombers lines up before a warship of the skies. A captain and lieutenant act as pilot and co-pilot. Two sergeants and four corporals man the machine guns, radio and other equipment. All belong to a bombardment squadron stationed at Langley Field, Virginia

Fort Benning paratroopers. Paratroopers take only a one-way ride. These soldiers of the skies in training at Fort Benning, Georgia prepare for a flight to an objective which they will reach with precision

Langley Field, Virginia. YB-17 bombardment squadrons. A combat crew of one of our mighty YB-17 bombers lines up before a warship of the skies. A captain and lieutenant act as pilot and co-pilot. Two sergeants and four corporals man the machine guns, radio and other equipment. All belong to a bombardment squadron stationed at Langley Field, Virginia

Archbishop Francis J. Spellman of New York touring the North African battle front, saying a mass for the men at the 57th Fighter Group of the U.S. Army 9th Air Force. This group, located "somewhere in Tunisia," knocked almost 100 Axis transports and fighters out of the skies in one engagement

Archbishop Francis J. Spellman of New York touring the North African battle front, saying mass for the men at the 57th Fighter Group of the U.S. Army 9th Air Force. This group, located "somewhere in Tunisia," knocked almost 100 Axis transports and fighters out of the skies in one engagement

Archbishop Francis J. Spellman of New York touring the North African battle front, saying mass for the men at the 57th Fighter Group of the U.S. Army 9th Air Force. This group, located "somewhere in Tunisia," knocked almost 100 Axis transports and fighters out of the skies in one engagement

Queen of the ocean. By Anna W. Spencer, of Rhode Island. Respectfully dedicated to President Lincoln. Air: When stars are in the quiet skies

U.S. experts test weather device. Washington, D.C., Sept. 13. Scientists of the National Bureau of Standards today conducted a test of the new radiometeorograph, a device attached to parachute and balloon and sent into the skies to radio back signals giving the pressure, temperature and humidity of the upper air. Preparing the balloon for the ascension are Dr. L.V. Astin, (left) of the Bureau's Electrical Division, and Dr. L.F. Curtiss, head of the Radium Division. The balloon carries the instrument as high as 50,000 or 60,000 feet. 9 to 11 miles high. Today's test was conducted for the U.S. Weather Bureau. 9/13/37

Under the skies of France

Under the skies of France

Under the skies of France

Under the skies of France

Stars are in the quiet skies

Stars are in the quiet skies

Stars are in the quiet skies

Stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

Innocence, childhoods rosy skies are o'er thee

Innocence, childhoods rosy skies are o'er thee

' Neath the starry skies of France

' Neath the starry skies of France

' Neath the starry skies of France

' Neath the starry skies of France

[Design drawing for stained glass window with text "When Morning Golds the Skies My Heart Awakening Cries"]

[Design drawing for stained glass window with text "When Morning Golds the Skies My Heart Awakening Cries"]

When the skies are brighter love; Ballad

When the skies are brighter love; Ballad

When the skies are brighter love; Ballad

When the skies are brighter love; Ballad

The Bird let loose in eastern skies

The Bird let loose in eastern skies

The Bird let loose in eastern skies

The Bird let loose in eastern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Somebody's waiting 'neath southern skies

Under the star gemmed skies

Under the star gemmed skies

Under the star gemmed skies

Under the star gemmed skies

Innocence, childhoods rosy skies are o'er thee

Innocence, childhoods rosy skies are o'er thee

Under the blue skies of France

Under the blue skies of France

Under the blue skies of France

Under the blue skies of France

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

When stars are in the quiet skies

At eve upon the lone seashore -- Last farewell -- Meet me in the willow glen -- When stars are in the quiet skies -- The pirate's serenade -- I wandered by the brookside

At eve upon the lone seashore -- Last farewell -- Meet me in the willow glen -- When stars are in the quiet skies -- The pirate's serenade -- I wandered by the brookside

At eve upon the lone seashore -- Last farewell -- Meet me in the willow glen -- When stars are in the quiet skies -- The pirate's serenade -- I wandered by the brookside

At eve upon the lone seashore -- Last farewell -- Meet me in the willow glen -- When stars are in the quiet skies -- The pirate's serenade -- I wandered by the brookside

At eve upon the lone seashore -- Last farewell -- Meet me in the willow glen -- When stars are in the quiet skies -- The pirate's serenade -- I wandered by the brookside

At eve upon the lone seashore -- Last farewell -- Meet me in the willow glen -- When stars are in the quiet skies -- The pirate's serenade -- I wandered by the brookside

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