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Map of Suffolk County, L.I., N.Y. : from actual surveys /

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Greenport, Suffolk County, New York

Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Sayville, Suffolk County, New York

Wildwood Lake Park, Riverhead, Township of Southhampton, Suffolk County, N.Y.

Boston, Massachuestts. Slum

Aero-view of Amityville, Suffolk County, Long Island, N.Y. 1925.

Page from Boston Sunday Post

Conversion. Safety razor plant. Checking dimensions of completed V-block, shop supervisor George Cole explains testing processes to Edith Krause. Both these workers have graduated from razor blades to tool posts because of the company's subcontract for production of war tools

Conversion. Food machinery plant. It was a matter of only a couple of hours to change this block adapter from its former work, on the production of cube steak machinery to spout cutting for war subcontracts. Cube Steak Machinery Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Food machinery plant. It was a matter of only a couple of hours to change this block adapter from its former work on the production of cube steak machinery to spout cutting for war subcontracts. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Toy factory. Before and after conversion. Product of this New England factory before conversion was toys, such as this steam roller. Today, after converting its machinery, it is making radio filter boxes for tanks and jeeps. The small parts shown in the picture are used in the filter boxes

Conversion. Safety razor plant. From razor blades to V-blocks in few weeks! That's the story of Estelle Wilson, one of a New England razor company's many women employees who are now operating machines recently converted to production of war essentials. Gillette

Conversion. Toy factory. This worker formerly produced toy wheels on this press; now his converted press adds to Uncle Sam's might in production of condenser caps for the Signal Corps, and of radio filter boxes for jeeps and tanks. Keystone

Conversion. Safety razor plant. Final inspection of V-blocks made by converted machines of a New England safety razor company. Gillette

Conversion. Food machinery plant. Cutting of spouts for anti-tank guns is the present work of this lathe, shown here at its former job--shaping of wooden rollers used with a belt control to carry steaks into the cube steak machine which is this New England plant's normal product. Conversion of this lathe, and the stepping up of its speed, has turned his skill from peacetime work to war production. Cube Steak Machinery Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Toy factory. Before and after conversion. Product of this New England factory before conversion was toys, such as this steam roller. Today, after converting its machinery, it is making radio filter boxes for tanks and jeeps. The small parts shown in the picture are used in the filter boxes

Conversion. Food machinery plant. John J. Morris used to cut steel disc covers with this universal milling machine. These disc covers were part of the cube steak machines which are the normal products of the New England plant where he is employed. Today, however, Morris used the same machine retooled for subcontract work--the cutting of large hexagonal nuts for a government arsenal. For cube steak machinery there was only one milling wheel, instead of the two shown above. "Hexing a nut" is a very simple job with a machine designed to shape the nut in a single operation, but such a machine is not available and time is short. Morris, therefore, shifts the round steel stock three times, cutting two sides at a time. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Safety razor plant. He used to make razor blades, but now he's a vital cog in Uncle Sam's war production machine. Charles Taylor, inspects steel part on converted horizontal grinder. Gillette

Conversion. Food machinery plant. Cutting of spouts for anti-tank guns is the present work of this lathe, shown here at its former job--shaping of wooden rollers used with a belt control to carry steaks into the cube steak machine which is this New England plant's normal product. Conversion of this lathe, and the stepping up of its speed, has turned his skill from peacetime work to war production. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Safety razor plant. Estelle Wilson, one of a New England razor factory's many women workers, checks completed V-blocks with blueprint specification. Because of their previous training, reading blueprints is no novelty to women employed in this plant which is now producing tool posts under subcontract. Gillette

Conversion. Safety razor plant. He used to make razor blades, but now he's a vital cog in Uncle Sam's war production machine. Charles Taylor, inspects steel part on converted horizontal grinder. Gillette

Conversion. Food machinery plant. Cutting of spouts for anti-tank guns is the present work of this lathe, shown here at its former job--shaping of wooden rollers used with a belt control to carry steaks into the cube steak machine which is this New England plant's normal product. Conversion of this lathe, and the stepping up of its speed, has turned his skill from peacetime work to war production. Cube Steak Machinery Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Food machinery plant. Operator of this universal milling machine is John J. Morris, shown here cutting steel disk covers for his company's normal product--cube steak machines. Today Morris uses the same machine adapted to war subcontract work --cutting of large hexagonal nuts for a government arsenal. "Hexing a nut" is a very simple job with a machine designed to shape the entire nut in one operation, but this machine is not available and time is short. Morris, therefore, turns the round steel stock three times, cutting two sides at a time

Conversion. Safety razor plant. In a New England plant manufacturing safety razors, honed head blade clips for razors. Normally her full-time job, Estelle now spends much of her time grinding V-blocks on these same machines, which are rapidly being converted to war production work under a subcontract

Conversion. Food machinery plant. This is a specially designed chuck for a newly acquired second-hand turret lathe, which this Eastern cube steak machinery plant recently bought from a nearby shoe factory in order to speed work on new defense subcontracts. Here it holds a three-and-a-quarter-inch hexagonal nut, which has just been threaded by the tap seen in the background. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Food machinery plant. It was a matter of only a couple of hours to change this block adapter from its former work on the production of cube steak machinery to spout cutting for war subcontracts. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Food machinery plant. John J. Morris used to cut steel disc covers with his universal milling machine. These disc covers were part of the cube steak machines which are the normal products of the New England plant where he is employed. Today, however, Morris uses the same machine, tooled over for war subcontract work, for the cutting of large hexagonal nuts for a government arsenal. For cube steak machinery there was only one milling wheel, instead of the two shown above. "Hexing a nut" is a very simple job with a machine designed to shape the nut in a single operation, but such a machine is not available and time is short. Morris, therefore, shifts the round steel stock three times, cutting two sides at a time. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Toy factory. Presses that once turned out metal toys and motion picture projectors are now being converted to production of filter boxes to be used in jeeps and tanks. Keystone

Conversion. Food machinery plant. Back to aid in his country's war effort is Phineas Davenport Allen, seventy-eight-year-old mechanic who worked on steering riggings for submarines during World War I. Today he is employed by a New England company, whose normal peacetime product is cube steak machinery. The drill press he operates was a valuable part of the company's peacetime equipment, is even more valuable today in the speeding of work on war subcontracts. Here Allen is drilling bearing caps for cube steak machines. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Food machinery plant. In the background is a cube steak machine, normal product of a New England plant now doing work on various war subcontracts. In the foreground are twenty-four items typical of those this plant has been doing to turn out for the war effort after certain retooling and conversion work had been done on its machinery. These changes are necessarily simple, for this company is still filling army and navy orders for the cube steak machine. Including among the twenty-four items are aluminum crankcases, steel spouts for anti-tank guns, bronze flanges, nuts and various screw machine parts. Cube Steak Machines Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Safety razor plant. Operation of surface grinder in production of V-blocks for the machine that makes America's war machine. Women are rapidly being drafted to fill men's jobs on light-duty machines as this

Noston, Massachusetts. An American Red Cross ambulance used by the blood donor service

Conversion. Food machinery plant. This turret lathe was purchased second-hand from a nearby shoe factory to speed production on war subcontracts held by a New England plant which formerly turned out cube steak machinery. Edwin Becker is checking on a retooling job in progress which will eventually fit the new lathe to thread three-and-a-quarter-inch hexagonal nuts. Becker is checking the measurements of the tool hole in the turret with those of the specially-built tap which will do the threading. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Toy factory. Closeup of press in production of condenser caps to which it has been converted. Former production of this machine consisted of toys and movie projectors. Keystone

Conversion. Food machinery plant. This is a specially designed chuck for a newly acquired second-hand turret lathe, which this Eastern cube steak machinery plant recently bought from a nearby shoe factory in order to speed work on new defense subcontracts. Here it holds a three-and-a-quarter-inch hexagonal nut, which has just been threaded by the tap seen in the background. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Food machinery plant. Back to aid in his country's war effort is Phineas Davenport Allen, seventy-eight-year-old mechanic who worked on steering riggings for submarines during World War I. Today he is employed by a New England company, whose normal peacetime product is cube steak machinery. The drill press he operates was a valuable part of the company's peacetime equipment, is even more valuable today in the speeding of work on war subcontracts. New tooling and a large drill have fitted this press for the drilling of screw machine parts needed in new machine tools for war production. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Toy factory. Between the heavy punch and the die, a vital war product is being turned out by a press which once produced only metal toys and movie projectors. U-shaped object is part of radio filter box essential to the army. Keystone

Conversion. Food machinery plant. This turret lathe was purchased second-hand from a nearby shoe factory to speed production on war subcontracts held by a New England plant which formerly turned out cube steak machinery. Edwin Becker is checking on a retooling job in progress which eventually fit the new lathe to thread three-and-a-quarter-inch hexagonal nuts. Becker is checking the measurements of the tool hole in the turret with those of the specially-built tap which will do the threading. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Safety razor plant. Because of their dexterity and precision in the operation of light-duty machines, women are appearing in ever-increasing numbers on America's production lines. Here Estelle Wilson resharpens grinding wheel with a diamond point, first step toward converting one of a razor company's machines to war production work. Gillette

Conversion. Food machinery plant. This turret lathe was purchased second-hand from a nearby shoe factory to speed production on war subcontracts held by a New England plant which formerly turned out cube steak machinery. Edwin Becker is checking on a retooling job in progress which eventually fit the new lathe to thread three-and-a-quarter-inch hexagonal nuts. Becker is checking the measurements of the tool hole in the turret with those of the specially-built tap which will do the threading. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Toy factory. Closeup of press in production of condenser caps to which it has been converted. Former production of this machine consisted of toys and movie projectors. Keystone

Conversion. Toy factory. Closeup of one of the hexagonal brass terminals in a screw machine recently converted to war production. Terminals are used for radio filter boxes in tanks and jeeps. Keystone

Conversion. Food machinery plant. In the background is a cube steak machine, normal product of a New England plant now doing work on various war subcontracts. In the foreground are twenty-four items typical of those this plant has been doing to turn out for the war effort after certain retooling and conversion work had been done on its machinery. These changes are necessarily simple, for this company is still filling army and navy orders for the cube steak machine. Including among the twenty-four items are aluminum crankcases, steel spouts for anti-tank guns, bronze flanges, nuts and various screw machine parts. Cube Steak Machines Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Safety razor plant. Closeup of grinder converted from production of safety razors to tool-posts. Only conversion necessary in this instance is of the tool holding the V-block, which is held in place by the magnetic chuck. Gillette

Conversion. Toy factory. Closeup of one of the hexagonal brass terminals in a screw machine recently converted to war production. Terminals are used for radio filter boxes in tanks and jeeps. Keystone

Conversion. Safety razor plant. Rita Allen sands V-blocks to remove marks made by milling machines. This razor factory has converted many of its machines to the production of tool posts which are essential to war production. Gillette

Conversion. Food machinery plant. Cutting of spouts for anti-tank guns is the present work of this lathe, shown here at its former job-shaping wooden rollers used with a belt control to carry steaks into the cube steak machine which is this New England plant's normal production. Conversion of this lathe, and the stepping up of its speed, has turned his skill from peacetime work to war production. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Food machinery plant. Operator of this universal milling machine is John J. Morris shown here cutting steel disc covers for his company's normal product--cube steak machines. Today, Morris used the same machine adapted to war subcontract work- -the cutting of large hexagonal nuts for a government arsenal. "Hexing a nut" is a very simple job with a machine designed to shape the entire piece in one operation, but such a machine is not available and time is short. Morris, therefore, shifts the round piece of steel stock three times, cutting two sides in each operation. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Toy factory. Skillfully operating this massive press, a worker stamps out part of a filter box essential to the armed forces. Before conversion of this machine, metal toys were stamped out. The changeover consisted chiefly of new dies. Keystone

Conversion. Food machinery plant. It was a matter of only a couple of hours to change this block adapter from its former work, on the production of cube steak machinery, to spout cutting for war subcontracts. Cube Steak Machinery Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Food machinery plant. John J. Morris used to cut steel disc covers with this universal milling machine. These disc covers were part of the cube steak machines which are the normal products of the New England plant where he is employed. Today, however, Morris used the same machine retooled for subcontract work--the cutting of large hexagonal nuts for a government arsenal. For cube steak machinery there was only one milling wheel, instead of the two shown above. "Hexing a nut" is a very simple job with a machine designed to shape the nut in a single operation, but such a machine is not available and time is short. Morris, therefore, shifts the round steel stock three times, cutting two sides at a time. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Conversion. Safety razor plant. In a New England plant manufacturing safety razors, honed head blade clips for razors. Normally her full-time job, Estelle now spends much of her time grinding V-blocks on these same machines, which are rapidly being converted to war production work under a subcontract

Conversion. Food machinery plant. Cutting of spouts for anti-tanks guns such as those shown in the foreground is the present work of this lathe, formerly used in the production of cube steak machines in a New England plant which is now turning out a number of parts for war machinery on subcontract. Conversion of this machine, and the stepping up of its speed required only a few hours. The operator, Ralph Hutchings, has also turned his skill to war work. He formerly operated a lathe in the production of cube steak machinery. Cube Steak Machine Company, Boston, Massachusetts

Coast Guard Auxiliary. Guardians of inland waters. At the Lewis wharf of Coast Guard headquarters in Boston, small craft made available by members of the auxiliary are lined up alongside of Coast Guard vessels

Gil Smith R Sloop PAULINE, Long Island Maritime Museum, West Sayville, Suffolk County, NY

William Monroe Trotter House, 97 Sawyer Avenue, Dorchester, Suffolk County, MA

Caumsett-Lloyd House, Lloyd Neck, Lloyd Harbor, Suffolk County, NY

Town Clerk's Office, Brookhaven, Suffolk County, NY

King's Chapel, Tremont Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Edward Everett Hale House, 39 Highland Street, Roxbury, Suffolk County, MA

245 West Canton Street (House), Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Customs House, State Street at India Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Caumsett Manor, Garage, Lloyd Neck, Lloyd Harbor, Suffolk County, NY

Massachusetts Historical Map, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

15 Elm Street (Building), Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Charles Street Jail Complex, Kitchen, 215 Charles Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Tuttle-Fordham Mill, Mill Road & Montauk Highway, Speonk, Suffolk County, NY

Milestone, Tremont Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

View of the new jail for Suffolk County, in the state of Massachusetts, erecting by the city of Boston upon Charles & North Grove Sts.

Park Street Church, Tremont & Park Streets, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

House, Sag Harbor, Suffolk County, NY

258 Washington Street (Building), Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Gil Smith BB Catboat LORELEI, Long Island Maritime Museum, West Sayville, Suffolk County, NY

Butler School, River Street, Hyde Park, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Church of Third Baptist Society, Charles Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Milestone, Opposite 1040 Adams Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Marshall-Hancock House (Mantels), 10 Marshall Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Peter Sergeant House, Washington Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Metropolitan Water Board, Chestnut Hill Low Service Pump Station, Beacon Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

John Bruster House (1670), East Setauket, Suffolk County, NY

House, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

Setauket Presbyterian Church, Setauket, Suffolk County, NY

Bevis Tucker House, Chelsea, Suffolk County, MA

158 Tremont Street (House), 158 Tremont Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Painters' Arms, Hanover Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Transcript Building, Washington & Milk Streets, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Caumsett Manor, Winter Cottage, Lloyd Neck, Lloyd Harbor, Suffolk County, NY

House, Huntington, Suffolk County, NY

Thomas Pierce House, Adams & Minot Streets, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Milestone, Public Alley No. 102, near Marshall Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Hampton House, Bridgehampton, Suffolk County, NY

Corwin House, Aquebogue, Suffolk County, NY

Captain's House, Captain's Row, Shurtleff Street, Chelsea, Suffolk County, MA

Steps between Brattle & Cornhill, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

John Howard Payne Memorial, Windmill, James Lane (moved from Mill Hill & NY, Pantigo), East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

Thomas Hallock Tavern, Smithtown, Suffolk County, NY

House, Huntington, Suffolk County, NY

Whiting Building, Washington Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Roxbury Gas Light Company, Gasholder, 8 Gerard Street at Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

Boundary Marker, Boston & Roxbury, 2 Nawn Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA