Library Of Congress
Library Of CongressPublic Domain ArchivePart of PICRYL.com. Not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin

U.S. Reports: Respublica v. Mesca, et al., 1 U.S. (1 Dall.) 73 (1783)

U.S. Reports: Kirkbride, et al. v. Durden, 1 U.S. (1 Dall.) 288 (1788)

U.S. Reports: Bunner v. Neil, 1 U.S. (1 Dall.) 457 (1789)

U.S. Reports: Graeme v. Harris, 1 U.S. (1 Dall.) 456 (1789)

[Engraved frontis. illus. to each of four volumes of Swift, Voyages de Gulliver (Paris, 1795)]

[Engraved frontis. illus. to each of four volumes of Swift, Voyages de Gulliver (Paris, 1795)]

[Engraved frontis. illus. to each of four volumes of Swift, Voyages de Gulliver (Paris, 1795)]

[Engraved frontis. illus. to each of four volumes of Swift, Voyages de Gulliver (Paris, 1795)]

[Swift Creek area, Chesterfield and Prince George Counties, Virginia] /

Plan of Forts Green, Laurence & Swift and lines of intrenchments constructed in the vicinity of Brooklyn for the defence of the city of New York.

Joseph Gardner Swift to Stephen Harriman Long, March 23, 1817

Guann's near Fort - Swift, Brooklyn / J.R. Smith, fecit., 1817.

Sketch no. 4 of roads between H.-Q. 10th Army Corps and Swift Creek on the south : with enemy's 2nd line of intrenchements [sic] around Drury's Bluff on the north /

[Map of the Shenandoah Valley from Harrisonburg to Mt. Jackson, with topographical detail along the principal roads from Thornton's Gap to Swift Run Gap and along several valley roads in northwestern Virginia].

Sketch no. 4 of roads between Hd. Qu. 10th Army Corps and Swift Creek on the south : with enemy's 2nd line of intrenchments around Drury's Bluff on the north /

Swift's Station, Carson and Lake Bigler Road - eastern summit of Sierra Nevada Mountains

[Bi-centenary celebration, floral parade, carriage of Mrs. D.G. Swift, Detroit, Mich.]

SWIFT & CO.

Mr. Swift's residence, Detroit, Mich.

SWIFT & CO.

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry - Swift & Co.'s Packing House: cutting up hogs, removing hams and shoulders

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry - Swift & Co.'s Packing House: great soup kettles - capacity 350,000 lbs. each

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry - Swift's Packing House: washing and tagging freshly killed lamb

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry: dropping hides and splitting chucks, beef dept., Swift & Co.'s Packing House

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry - Swift & Co.'s Packing House: dressing lamb for the market, removing the pelts

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry: dressing beef, slaughtering floor, Swift & Co.'s Packing House

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry - Swift's Packing House: automatic scraping machine (capacity 1000 hogs per hour)

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry - Swift's Packing House: pickling and curing warehouse (contains 10,000 tons of hams)

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry: dressing beef, removing hides and splitting backbones, Swift's Packing House

Splitting backbones and final inspection - hogs ready for cooler, Swift & Co., Chicago

Chicago - Meat Packing Industry - Swift & Co.'s Packing House: killing hogs, shackling pen and wheel

Glacier Nat'l Pk. View East from Swift Current Pass

[Mt. Gould, head of Swift Current Glacier, Glacier National Park Montana]

Glacier National Park, Montana. View east from Swift Current Pass

Mrs. Samuel Swift

Sam'l [i.e, Samuel] Swift

Mrs. Sam'l [i.e, Samuel] Swift

Laura Santos and family, 500 Wichendon Street, Providence. Said 12 years. Picks 20 to 25 measures a day. Is in 4th grade will be here 5 weeks more. Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Carrie Maderyos ready to pick. Said 12 years old - 2nd year picking. Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Mary Alimeda, 500 Wichendon Street, Providence. Is in 3rd grade. Also Anton Enos of E. Falmouth. Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Joe carrying cranberries. Said 10 years old. Picks also. Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Carre Maderyos and Joe Sylva. (See preceding labels.) Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Young pickers on Swift's Bog. All working: including baby in foreground. (See names on other label.) Location: Falmouth vicinity - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts

Young pickers on Swift's Bog. All working. Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Showing pickers at Swift's Bog. Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Anna Perry, 2 years old. Was picking a little. Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Going to work. The manager said, "We have 150 workers beside the kids." Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Joe Perry, 10 years old, Lives 3 Walnut Street, New Providence. Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Showing pickers at Swift's Bog. Location: Falmouth vicinity - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts

Young pickers on Swift's Bog. All working. Location: Falmouth vicinity - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts

Going to work. The manager said, "We have 150 workers beside the kids." Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Five cranberry pickers - all cousins. Smallest is Joe Sylva, 618 Water St., New Bedford, said 10 years old. Picks 10 pails a day at 7 cents. Arthur Sylva, said 13 years, picks 30 pails a day. Carrie Maderyos, 618 Water Street, New Bedford, said 12 years - second year picking. The group expects to be picking here four weeks more which will cause loss of New Bedford schooling at least 6 weeks. (See photos of them picking next day). Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Young pickers on Swift's Bog. All working: including baby in foreground. (See names on other label.) Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Lena Rose, 7 years old. Lives East Falmouth. Picks 6 to 9 measures a day. Manuel Rose, 9 years old. Picks 9 measures. Location: Falmouth [vicinity] - Swift's Bog, Massachusetts.

Groups of workers in Clayton (N.C.) Cotton Mills. Every one went in to work when whistle blew, and I saw most of them at work during the morning when I went through. Mr. W.H. Swift talked with a boy recently who said he was ten years old and works in the Clayton Cotton Mill, also that others the same age worked. Here they are. I couldn't get the youngest girls in the photos. Clayton is but a short ride from the State Capitol. (The Superintendent watched the photographing without comment.) Location: Clayton, North Carolina.

Groups of workers in Clayton (N.C.) Cotton Mills. Every one went in to work when whistle blew, and I saw most of them at work during the morning when I went through. Mr. W.H. Swift talked with a boy recently who said he was ten years old and works in the Clayton Cotton Mill, also that others the same age worked. Here they are. I couldn't get the youngest girls in the photos. Clayton is but a short ride from the State Capitol. (The Superintendent watched the photographing without comment.) Clayton, North Carolina.

Groups of workers in Clayton (N.C.) Cotton Mills. Every one went into work when the whistle blew, and I saw most of them at work during the morning when I went through. Mr. W.H. Swift talked with a boy recently who said he was ten years old and works in the Clayton Cotton Mill--also that others the same age worked. Here they are. I couldn't get the youngest girls in the photos. Clayton is but a short ride from the State Capitol. (The Superintendent watched the photographing without comment.) Location: Clayton, North Carolina.

Groups of workers in Clayton (N.C.) Cotton Mills. Every one went into work when the whistle blew, and I saw most of them at work during the morning when I went through. Mr. W.H. Swift talked with a boy recently who said he was ten years old and works in the Clayton Cotton Mill--also that others the same age worked. Here they are. I couldn't get the youngest girls in the photos. Clayton is but a short ride from the state Capitol. (The Superintendent watched the photographing without comment.) Location: Clayton, North Carolina.

Groups of workers in Clayton (N.C.) Cotton Mills. Every one went in to work when whistle blew, and I saw most of them at work during the morning when I went through. Mr. W.H. Swift talked with a boy recently who said he was ten years old and works in the Clayton Cotton Mill, also that others the same age worked. Here they are. I couldn't get the youngest girls in the photos. Clayton Is but a short ride from the State Capitol. (The Superintendent watched the photographing without comment.) Location: Clayton, North Carolina.

Groups of workers in Clayton (N.C.) Cotton Mills. Every one went in to work when the whistle blew, and I saw most of them at work during the morning when I went through. Mr. W.H. Swift talked with a boy recently who said he was ten years old and works in the Clayton Cotton Mill, also that others the same age worked. Here they are. I couldn't get the youngest girls in the photos. Clayton is but a short ride from the State Capitol. (The Superintendent watched the photographing without comment.) Location: Clayton, North Carolina.

Groups of workers in Clayton (N.C.) Cotton Mills. Every one went in to work when whistle blew, and I saw most of them at work during the morning when I went through. Mr. W.H. Swift talked with a boy recently who said he was ten years old and works in the Clayton Cotton Mill, also that others the same age worked. Here they are. I couldn't get the youngest girls in the photos. Clayton is but a short ride from the State Capitol. (The Superintendent watched the photographing without comment.) Location: Clayton, North Carolina.

Another "Dependent Father." He is so recorded in the Ordinary's office where he made application for his mino[r] children to work. He has three children in the mill. When he married the present wife, she brought with her seven children, three of which are in the mill. The mother and father are both in mill work. He works part of the time. Lyell, Columbian and Swift Mills, Columbus, Ga. Lyell, Columbus & Swift Mills. Location: Columbus, Georgia.

Another "Dependent Father". He is so recorded in the Ordinary's office where he made application for his minor children to work. He has three children in the mill. When he married the present wife, she brought with her seven children, three of which are in the mill. The mother and father are both in mill work. He works part of the time. Lyell, Columbus and Swift Mills. Location: Columbus, Georgia.

Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. verso of card: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 12 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney. Location: Lumberton, North Carolina

Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. verso of card: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 12 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney. Location: Lumberton, North Carolina
Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. verso of card: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 12 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney. Location: Lumberton, North Carolina

[Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. [verso of card]: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 1/2 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney.] Location: [Lumberton, North Carolina].

[Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. [verso of card]: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 1/2 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney.]  Location: [Lumberton, North Carolina].
[Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. [verso of card]: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 1/2 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney.] Location: [Lumberton, North Carolina].

Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. [verso of card]: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 1/2 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney. Location: Lumberton, North Carolina.

Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. [verso of card]: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 1/2 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney.  Location: Lumberton, North Carolina.
Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. [verso of card]: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 1/2 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney. Location: Lumberton, North Carolina.

Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. verso of card: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 12 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney. Location: Lumberton, North Carolina

Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. verso of card: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 12 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney. Location: Lumberton, North Carolina
Flossie Britt, 6 years old has been working several months steadily as spinner in the Lumberton Cotton Mills. Makes 30 cents a day. Lonnie Britt, 7 years old has been working steadily for 1 year as spinner. Makes 40 cents a day. Ages and data given me by their grandmother at home, and I saw them going and coming early and late. 2 smallest in group. When Mr. Swift made his last visit to Lumberton he was shown through these mills by Mr. Jennings, who asked Mr. Swift how many children he thought there were under age. Mr. Swift said about 20, Mr. Jennings told him there were at least 30, and called one of his men to prove he was right. He told Mr. Swift that all the mills were employing children under age. N.B. SEE OTHER SIDE BEFORE USING LABEL (over) Important. verso of card: N.B. April 1915: A subsequent visit to this family brought out the information that Flossie was 8 years old and Lonnie 10 years old when I saw them. That the boss asked the mother to bring Lonnie to work, and that she worked about 12 year as steadily as she could. That another boss asked the mother to bring Flossie to work and that the girl soon became sick. The mother became disgusted and quit the mill for life on her father's farm where they are now located. There was no need for the children working. Since they moved to the farm the superintendent and 2 other persons visited the family and tried to intimidate them and get them to make mis-statements about the children's ages and work. See Hine report for additional details, all given to Mr. Hine in the presence of a prominent Lumberton attorney. Location: Lumberton, North Carolina

Gen. Eben Swift

[Callie Campbell, 11 years old, picks 75 to 125 pounds of cotton a day, and totes 50 pounds of it when sack gets full. "No, I don't like it very much." Lewis W. Hine. See 4590. See W.H. Swift Report.] Location: [Potawotamie County, Oklahoma]

[Cleo Campbell, 9 years old, picks 75 to 100 pounds of cotton a day. Expects to start school soon. Said: "I'd ruther go to school and then I wouldn't have ter work." Father said she and her sister begin about 6 A.M. and work until 6 or 7 P.M. with 1 1/2 hours off at noon. Lewis W. Hine. See 4590. See W.H. Swift Report.] Location: Potawotamie, Oklahoma.

Rock Creek School #32 (5 miles east of Shawnee) opened September 11th--8 months term. 34 present. J.W. Evans, Principal, P.O. Route 2, Shawnee, said there are only half as many as he expects after cotton picking is over. Lewis W. Hine. See W. H. Swift Report. Location: Potawotamie County, Oklahoma.

[Pioneer School #13 (6 miles northwest of Shawnee) opened October 2nd 7 months term. Miss Lela Ginsinger, Principal (been here 2 years). Photo shows only 6 children present and 2 teachers in the third week of school. Expect 24 pupils. All absences are due to cotton. A few of the larger ones will be out in the Spring for cotton. Lewis W. Hine. See W. H. Swift Report.] Location: [Potawotamie County, Oklahoma]

Campbell family picking cotton. W.W. Campbell, Route 1, Box 64, Shawnee. Children go to Pioneer School, 7 miles northwest of Shawnee (see photo of same) Father said: "Both the girls can hoe the cotton as well as any grown-up." Lewis W. Hine. See W.H. Swift Report. Location: Potawotamie County, Oklahoma.

New Hope School #41. 4 miles northwest of Shawnee. 31 present. Opened October 2nd--8 months term. Principal, Mr. J.H. Harrison, P.O. Route 6, Shawnee, says there ought to be twice that number present and will be after cotton picking is over. Lewis W. Hine. See W.H. Swift Report. Location: Potawotamie County, Oklahoma.

Callie Campbell, 11 years old, picks 75 to 125 pounds of cotton a day, and totes 50 pounds of it when sack gets full. "No, I don't like it very much." See 4590. Lewis W. Hine. See W.H. Swift Report. Location: Potawotamie County, Oklahoma.

Pioneer School #13 (6 miles northwest of Shawnee) opened October 2nd--7 months term. Miss Lela Ginsinger, Principal (been here 2 years). Photo shows only 6 children present and 2 teachers in the third week of school. Expect 24 pupils. All absences are due to cotton. A few of the larger ones will be out in the Spring for cotton. Lewis W. Hine. See W.H. Swift Report. Location: Potawotamie County, Oklahoma.

Acme School #24 (4 miles northwest of Shawnee): Miss Lois Millard, Principal. (P.O. Dale, Okla., Route 1). 26 present, 40 expected after all families return from southern part of the state where they have been picking cotton. Lewis W. Hine. See W. H. Swift Report. Location: Potawotamie County, Oklahoma.

[Johnnie, Carrie and Jim Davenport picking cotton for MR. J. P. Daws, Route 1, Shawnee. Johnnie picks 75 pounds, Carrie 100 pounds and Jim 150 to 200 pounds a day. Get $1.00 a hundred pounds. No School yet. Mother is a renter; moves about a great deal. Lewis W. Hine. See W.H. Swift Report.] Location: [Potawotamie County, Oklahoma].

[Acme School #24 (4 miles northwest of Shawnee): Miss Lois Millard, Principal. (P.O. Dale, Okla., Route 1). 26 present, 40 expected after all families return from southern part of the state where they have been picking cotton. Lewis W. Hine. See W. H. Swift Report.] Location: [Potawotamie County, Oklahoma]

Johnnie, Carrie and Jim Davenport picking cotton for Mr. J.P. Daws, Route 1, Shawnee. Johnnie picks 75 pounds, Carrie 100 pounds and Jim 150 to 200 pounds a day. Get $1.00 a hundred pounds. No school yet. Mother is a renter; moves about a great deal. Lewis W. Hine. See W.H. Swift Report. Location: Potawotamie County, Oklahoma.

Balderson & Hayden, Swift & Co. Ed McLean, Friendship

Balderson & Hayden, Swift & Co. Ed McLean, Friendship

Balderson & Hayden, Swift & Co. Ed McLean, Friendship

The greatest moment in history / exclusive photographs by Helen Johns Kirtland and Lucian Swift Kirtland, Leslie's Staff Correspondents.

The great day at Versailles when France effaced the memory of 1871 / exclusive photographs by Helen Johns Kirtland and Lucian Swift Kirtland, Leslie's Staff Correspondents.

[Lucian Swift Kirtland leaning against sandbags in trench]

Swift

[Helen Johns Kirtland and Lucian Swift Kirtland standing next to an airplane in Berlin, Germany]

W.A. Swift, 1921

The Fort Worth stock yards and Swift Packing House, Texas

Swift & Co., Clinton, Iowa. View of duck feeding pen

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Swift packing plant. South Omaha, Nebraska

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Kyle (Swift) Mansion, 12th & 3rd., Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia

Antiaircraft gun carriage. This master machinist lays out the precision parts that go to make up a thirty-seven millimeter anti-aircraft gun carriage. Swift flying planes present a difficult target, the anti-aircraft gun must be a precision instrument. War program production scene in one of Pennsylvania's heavy industry plants now converted to the production of vitally needed military equipment. AETNA. Ellwood CIty, Pennsylvania

F.H. Swift, residence at 161 S. Woodland Ave., Englewood, New Jersey. Living room, to piano

F.H. Swift, residence at 161 S. Woodland Ave., Englewood, New Jersey. Bedroom, to beds

F.H. Swift, residence at 161 S. Woodland Ave., Englewood, New Jersey. Sunroom

F.H. Swift, residence at 161 S. Woodland Ave., Englewood, New Jersey. Bedroom dressing table

Library Of Congress

The objects in this archive are from Library of Congress - the nation’s first established cultural institution and the largest library in the world, with millions of items including books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library provides Congress, the federal government and the American people with a rich, diverse and enduring source of knowledge to inform, inspire and engage them and support their intellectual and creative endeavors.

Disclaimer: A work of the Library of Congress is "a work prepared by an officer or employee" of the federal government "as part of that person's official duties." In general, under section 105 of the Copyright Act, such works are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law and are therefore in the public domain. This website is developed as a part of the world's largest public domain archive, PICRYL.com, and not developed or endorsed by the Library of Congress, https://www.picryl.com

Developed by GetArchive, 2015-2020