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A Map of forty miles north, thirty miles west, and twentyfive miles south of Boston, including an accurate draft of the harbour and town.

Jehial Bryan's patent Daily account of time for thirty years. Utica. Northway & Porter printers. [c. 1829].

The purchase of Cuba pictorially considered, after the passage of the act appropriating thirty millions for the purpose, A.D. Eighteen hundred and ???? / Hoppin.

Sir: At a meeting of bank officers, held at the Merchants' bank, on the 21st inst., it was agreed that from and after that date, and for thirty days; that the specie held by the banks then associated, should be considered and treated as a common

Lieutenant Tompkins, at the head of Company B, U.S. Dragoons, charging into town at Fairfax Court House, killing thirty of the enemy and carrying off five prisoners, in the face of fifteen hundred secession troops, on Saturday, June 1, 1861

The flag with thirty four stars

Avoid the draft! ... All men who desire to join any particular regiment of cavalry now in the field, are hereby authorized to present themselves at any time during the next thirty days ... James B. Fry Provost Marshal General. Norristown, Pa. He

Grant's great campaign--the approach to Richmond, map of the country within thirty miles of the rebel capital / G. Woolworth Colton, N.Y.

The Triumph of freedom over slavery. Thirty eighth Congress of the United States of America.

Thirty five miles around Richmond, Va. /

My dear Sir: In order to complete the Congregational church in this city thirty thousand dollars will be required ... O. O. Howard. Chairman building com. Washington, D. C. June 10, 1867.

Abolishing Slavery. Joint resolution of the thirty eight Congress of the United States of America, proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, abolishing slavery.

[Gallery of Thirty Meters, looking toward the Central Dome, with bronze statue of St. Michael in foreground, Paris Exposition, 1889]

[Gallery of Thirty Meters, looking toward the Central Dome, with the bronze statue of St. Michael in foreground, Paris Exposition, 1889]

[Gallery of Thirty Meters, Paris Exposition, 1889]

[Gallery of Thirty Meters, Paris Exposition, 1889]

[Gallery of Thirty Meters, looking toward altar piece from the Church of St. Ouen, and Haviland exhibit, Paris Exposition, 1889]

[Central Dome, interior view, looking toward the Gallery of Thirty Meters, Paris Exposition, 1889]

[Gallery of Thirty Meters, Paris Exposition, 1889]

[Interior of the Central Dome, looking toward the Gallery of Thirty Meters and the entrance to the jewellers' exhibit, Paris Exposition, 1889]

[Thiébaut Fréres bonze exhibit in the Gallery of Thirty Meters, Paris Exposition, 1889]

[Thiébaut Fréres bronze exhibit in the Gallery of Thirty Meters, Paris Exposition, 1889]

Two Yemschiks immediately after a drive of thirty versts on the Siberian post road in 40 degree below zero temp.

Mrs. R. B. Quay, of Salt Lake City, Utah, one of the members of the National Woman's Party who has served a thirty day sentence at the government jail and workhouse at Washington for picketing the White House gates with a suffrage banner.

Some of the young workers in Laurel Cotton Mills, Miss. Tallest man is Mr. Hollingworth. Two of his boys in front row. Sylvester, ten years old, "Only helps in the mill afternoons and Saturdays." "But if I was twelve," he said, "I'd go to work to-morrow." The other boy, Floyd, said he was thirteen, but he doesn't seem to be. He said, "I sweeps. Get thirty cents a day. Sweepin' keeps you at it right steady. Not much chance to rest. You have to be twelve to work." Location: Laurel, Mississippi.

Photos taken during noon hour, October 23rd, 1912, at the Loray Mills, Gastonia, N.C. They said they were working and went in to work. At night I counted over thirty children coming out when the whistle blew, and they seemed to be from ten to twelve years old. The Superintendent was much disturbed over the photos. Location: Gastonia, North Carolina.

Photos taken during noon hour, October 23rd, 1912, at the Loray Mills, Gastonia, N.C. They said they were working and went in to work. At night I counted over thirty children coming out when the whistle blew, and they seemed to be from ten to twelve years old. The Superintendent was much disturbed over the photos. Location: Gastonia, North Carolina.

Photos taken during noon hour, October 23rd, 1912, at the Loray Mills, Gastonia, N.C. They said they were working and went in to work. At night I counted over thirty children coming out when the whistle blew, and they seemed to be from ten to twelve years old. The Superintendent was much disturbed over the photos. Location: Gastonia, North Carolina.

Photos taken during noon hour, October 23rd, 1912, at the Loray Mills, Gastonia, N.C. They said they were working and went in to work. At night I counted over thirty children coming out when the whistle blew, and they seemed to be from ten to twelve years old. The Superintendent was much disturbed over the photos. Location: Gastonia, North Carolina.

Photos taken during noon hour, October 23rd, 1912, at the Loray Mills, Gastonia, N.C. They said they were working and went in to work. At night I counted over thirty children coming out when the whistle blew, and they seemed to be from ten to twelve years old. The Superintendent was much disturbed over the photos. Location: Gastonia, North Carolina.

Photos taken during noon hour, October 23rd, 1912, at the Loray Mills, Gastonia, N.C. They said they were working and went in to work, At night I counted over thirty children coming out when the whistle blew, and they seemed to be from ten to twelve years old. The superintendent was much disturbed over the photos. Location: Gastonia, North Carolina.

Photos taken during noon hour, October 23rd, 1912, at the Loray Mills, Gastonia, N.C. They said they were working and went in to work. At night I counted over thirty children coming out when the whistle blew, and they seemed to be from ten to twelve years old. The Superintendent was much disturbed over the photos. Location: Gastonia, North Carolina.

Thirty Third St. southwest from 8th Ave., New York City

[New York City - Thirty Fourth St. west from 8th Ave.]

[Boyle's Thirty Acres, Jersey City, N.J.: Dempsey and Geroges Carpentier in arena before fight]

[Newsreel cameramen with cameras at the Dempsey-Carpentier boxing match at Boyle's Thirty Acres, Jersey City, N.J.]

[Dempsey-Carpentier boxing match at Boyle's Thirty Acres, Jersey City, N.J.: Tex Rickard standing between 2 men in front of photographers]

[Boyle's Thirty Acres, Jersey City, N.J.: Jack Dempsey posing in ring in boxing position]

[Dempsey-Carpentier boxing match at Boyle's Thirty Acres, Jersey City, N.J.: Crowd at Carpentier's training camp]

[Dempsey-Carpentier boxing match at Boyle's Thirty Acres, Jersey City, N.J.: Tex Rickard standing on right of another man in front of photographers]

John Cheshire, Pres. and "Thirty Club," London, England

Colonel Walter B. McCasky, U.S.A., Executive of Fifth Annual Citizens Military training camp of [...] area at Camp Meade, Md. Under the supervision of Col[...] , this camp will run for thirty days, from the from J[...] immediately after the camp he take command of the 38th [...] Infantry on the West Coast

Seventy-one years, or, My life with photography. Columbus Circle from thirty stories up, Mar. 4, 1932

Ghost town three miles south of Canton, Pennsylvania. The thirty people now living here are all on relief

Sod house in which this man's father homesteaded thirty years ago. Pennington County, South Dakota

Everyday from twenty to thirty cars moving out from the Dakotas pass the Montana Highway Department's port of entry. Montana

Clifford Beason examining a sample of corn raised in 1936. The corn in this crib represents total crop from two hundred thirty acres of corn in five hundred twenty acre farm. His estimate of the crop is thirty-five bushels. Iowa

The sheriff of McAlester, Oklahoma, sitting in front of the jail. He has been sheriff for thirty years

Farm and woodlot in New York State about thirty miles west of Albany. Albany County, New York

Farmer watering stock thinned by drought. Thirty miles south of Belfield, North Dakota

The sheriff of McAlester, Oklahoma, sitting in front of the jail. He has been sheriff for thirty years

Migrant camp on the outskirts of Sacramento, California on the American River. About thirty families lived on this flat

Two-room home of Clifford Blum farm, one hundred thirty acres. Rents farm from active farmer. Crop share lease, half corn, two-fifths small grains. Owner intends to add on to house next year. Buildings are kept up. Near Terril, Iowa

Autoworkers' houses. These houses rent for twenty-five to thirty dollars and have stoves, but water is drawn from a commercial well. Flint, Michigan

George Deacon, farmer on thirty acres of submarginal land. Oswego County, New York

Detail of rammed earth construction near Birmingham, Alabama. Texture of wall after thirty days of weathering

One of a Mexican field gang of migratory laborers thinning and weeding cantaloupe plants. The young plants are "capped" with wax paper spread over a wire wicket to protect against cold and accelerate growth. The laborers' wages are thirty cents an hour. Imperial Valley, California

Farmhouse on the owner-operated two hundred thirty acre farm of Mary Lah, widow. This farm, which has carried a small mortgage since the Depression, lies west of Fowler, Indiana, near the Illinois state line. Note the asbestos shingles, good fences and fine appearance of the yard

Mexican gang of migratory laborers under a Japanese field boss. These men are thinning and weeding cantaloupe plants. Wages thirty cents an hour. These young plants are "capped" with wax paper spread over a wire wicket to protect against cold and to accelerate growth. Imperial Valley, California

Carrot pullers from Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri and Mexico. Coachella Valley, California. "We come from all states and we can't make a dollar a day in this field noways. Working from seven in the morning till twelve noon we earn an average of thirty five cents"

Barn and silo on the owner-operated farm of two hundred thirty acres belonging to Mary Lah, widow. This farm, which has carried a small mortgage since the depression, lies west of Fowler, Indiana, near the state line of Illinois

A tractor pioneer of the Mississippi Delta. In 1927 he had 160 colored tenant families working his land, in 1936 he won thirty Farmall tractors and employs thirty families on day labor basis. He says, "Now I can make money. Hours are nothing to us. You can't industrialize farming. We in Mississippi know how to treat our niggers"

Mexican gang of migratory laborers under a Japanese field boss. These men are thinning and weeding cantaloupe plants. Wages thirty cents an hour. These young plants are "capped" with wax paper spread over a wire wicket to protect against cold and to accelerate growth. Imperial Valley, California

Lowering baskets full of cans into cooking kettles. Cans of peas are steam pressure-cooked for twenty or thirty minutes. Sun Prairie, Wisconsin

Coachella Valley, California. Carrot pullers from Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri and Mexico. "We come from all states, and we can't make a dollar a day in this field noways. Working from seven in the morning till twelve noon we earn an average of thirty five cents"

One of a Mexican gang of migratory laborers thinning and weeding cantaloupe plants at thirty cents an hour; the young plants are capped with wax paper spread over a wire wicket to protect against cold and accelerate growth. Imperial Valley, California

Corn crib on the owner-operated farm of Mary Lah, two hundred thirty acres. The farm, which has carried a small mortgage since the depression, lies west of Fowler, Indiana, near the Illinois state line

Thirty year-old mule; the girl is twenty-five. Farm in Coffey County, Kansas

The end of the line of one hundred thirty Negro farmers with mule teams who are buying their cotton seed and other supplies cooperatively at Roanoke Farms, North Carolina

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Fruit jars being sterilized on old lady Graham's back fence in berry season. Near Conway, Arkansas. "We just gather and can peas, beans, berries, and sausage when we butcher the hogs in the winter. We put up seventy-five quarts of berries, sixty of beans, sixty of kraut, thirty of grapes and twenty of peaches. I swapped two bushels of grapes and got two bushels of peaches and I swapped one bushel of grapes for one bushel of apples"

Leveling hummocks in the dust bowl. Coldwater District, thirty miles north of Dalhart, Texas

Leveling hummocks in dust bowl, thirty miles north of Dalhart, Texas. Farmer: "Every dime I got is tied up right here. If I don't get it out, I've got to drive off and leave it. Where would I go and what would I do? I know what the land did once for me, maybe it will do it again." Son: "It would be better if the sod had never been broke. My father's broke plenty of it. Could I get a job in California?"

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Home of rural rehabilitation client. Tulare County, California. They bought twenty acres of raw unimproved land with a first payment of fifty dollars which was money saved out of relief budget (August 1936). They received a FSA (Farm Security Administration) loan of seven hundred dollars for stock and equipment. Now they have a one-room shack, seven cows, three sows, and homemade pumping plant, along with ten acres of improved permanent pasture. Cream check approximately thirty dollars a month. Husband also works about ten days a month on odd jobs outside the farm. Husband is twenty-six years old, wife twenty-two. Three small children. Been in California five years. "Piece by piece this place gets put together. One more piece of pipe and our water tank will be finished."

Home of rural rehabilitation client, Tulare County, California. They bought twenty acres of raw unimproved land with a first payment of fifty dollars which was money saved out of relief budget (August 1936). They received a Farm Security Administration (FSA) loan of seven hundred dollars for stock and equipment. Now they have a one-room shack, seven cows, three sows, and homemade pumping plant, along with ten acres of improved permanent pasture. Cream check approximately thirty dollars per month. Husband also works about ten days a month outside the farm. Husband is twenty-six years old, wife twenty-two, three small children. Been in California five years. "Piece by piece this place gets put together. One more piece of pipe and our water tank will be finished."

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Princesses at the National Rice Festival, Crowley, Louisiana. There were thirty of these chosen from different communities throughout the rice section, the Queen being chosen from them

Home of rural rehabilitation client, Tulare County, California. They bought twenty acres of raw unimproved land with a first payment of fifty dollars which was money saved out of relief budget (August 1936). They received a Farm Security Administration (FSA) loan of seven hundred dollars for stock and equipment. Now they have a one-room shack, seven cows, three sows, and homemade pumping plant, along with ten acres of improved permanent pasture. Cream check approximately thirty dollars per month. Husband also works about ten days a month outside the farm. Husband is twenty-six years old, wife twenty-two, three small children. Been in California five years. "Piece by piece this place gets put together. One more piece of pipe and our water tank will be finished."

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Mexican miner's children feeding chickens in the kitchen. Their mother is thirty years old and has had ten children. Scotts Run, Bertha Hill, West Virginia

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Veteran migrant agricultural worker. He has followed the road for about thirty years. When asked where his home was he said, "It's all over." He was camped in Wagoner County, Oklahoma

Lettuce field near Ontario, Malheur County, Oregon. Lettuce is the most speculative crop in Malheur Valley. It yielded two hundredf and thirty nine dollars per acre in 1939. Yielded so well because lettuce at Salinas, California, froze

Mrs. Chris Ament who has lived for thirty three years on dry land wheat farm in the Columbia Basin. Washington, Grant County, three miles south of Quincy. See general caption number 35

Washington, Yakima Valley. Drought refugee, aged sixty three, from Bismark, North Dakota. "Come to Washington three years ago in that Chevy coupe you see over there and twenty-five dollars cash. Had 480 acres back there. I dried out after thirty years, lost it, and walked out." With help of Work Projects Administration (WPA) and supplementary work on ranches is buying three quaters of an acre in shacktown near Yakima, has it nearly paid for, has good garden. "On my own place I can't starve."

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The Arnold farm, seen from road. Traveling medicine salesman is calling. Shows vegetable garden to right, and berry patch in front of house. The land which family has cleared is across a deep gully at the back and extends up and over the hill behind the house. Western Washington, Thurston County, Michigan Hill. General caption thirty six

Chris Ament, on dry land wheat farm of Columbia Basin where he has farmed for thirty three years. "I won't live to get the benefits of the water, but I hope to be able to see it." Washington, Grant County, three miles south of Quincy. See general caption number 35

Washington, Yakima Valley. Drought refugee, aged sixty three, from Bismark, North Dakota. "Came to Washington three years ago in that Chevy coupe you see over there and twenty-five dollars cash. Had 480 acres back there. I dried out after thirty years, lost it, and walked out." With help of Work Projects Administration (WPA) and supplementary work on ranches is buying three quarters of an acre in shacktown near Yakima, has it nearly paid for, has good garden. "On my own place I can't starve."

Builds own Jalopy. Washington, D.C., Feb. 2. Thirty dollars was all it cost Robert Preston, 16-year-old high school senior, to build this midget automobile. Weighing approximately 250 pounds, the 'jalopy' is powered with a washing machine motor of 3-4 horsepower and has a maximum speed of 20 miles an hour. His license tags for this year will cost 32 cents, 2-2-39

Sam Cates from Oklahoma, now establishing a little farm up Cow Hollow, with his great grandfather's gun, who brought it from South Carolina. The gun is 150 years old. This family took this gun from South Carolina to Texas, from Texas to Arkansas (five years) from Arkansas to Oklahoma (thirty years), from Oklahoma to Southeastern Oregon. "'Hit goes to my youngest boy but I'm goin' to be using that second hand casket I traded for afore he gits it."

Paymaster on edge of pea fields pays a quarter for every hamper of thirty pounds brought to the scale. Near Calipatria, Imperial Valley, California

Powerful electric locomotives pull up to thirty cars loaded with coal through the entries of the mine. Old Ben number eight. West Frankfort, Illinois

Negro man living near Jefferson, Texas. This Negro owned about thirty acres on which he and his family and his sister and her family lived. They had done no farming for about four years, supporting their families by day labor. The man said he would like to farm again but could not get enough cash to get started

Mrs Arnold, age thirty two, does man's work on the rough and stumpy land to build a farm. Western Washington, Thurston County, Michigan Hill. See general caption number 36

Home of Free family who had lived in Beaver County, Oklahoma, for thirty years. Dead Ox Flat, Malheur County, Oregon