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Mrs. Mary Jacquith [i.e., Jaquith]

United Nations exhibit by OWI in Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. View of entrance from 5th Avenue

United Nations Fight for Freedom: Boy Scout in front of Capitol. They help out by delivering posters to help the war effort

United Nations Fight for Freedom : colored, white and Chinese Boy Scouts in front of Capitol, They help out by delivering poster to help the war effort

United Nations exhibit put on by OWI in Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. Central motif was this frame containing copy of Atlantic charter, with amplifiers at each end broadcasting speeches by Roosevelt, Churchill and Chiang Kai-Shek every half hour, and surrounded by statues of the four freedoms

United Nations exhibit by OWI in Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. View of entrance from 5th Avenue

United Nations exhibit put on by OWI in Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. Central motif was this frame containing copy of Atlantic charter, with amplifiers at each end broadcasting speeches by Roosevelt, Churchill and Chiang Kai-Shek every half hour, and surrounded by statues of the four freedoms

Rockefeller Plaza, exhibit [for] United Nations by OWI, New York, N.Y. Between photographic displays is [the] Atlantic charter in frame with transmitters at each end and where voices of Roosevelt, Churchill and Chiang Kai-Shek are heard each half hour; surrounded by statues of the four freedoms

United Nations exhibit by OWI at Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. Close-up of photographic display and seals of the nations

Huge drop hammers work day and night forming sheet metal parts for United Nations bombers and fighters at the North American Aviation, Inc., plant, Inglewood, Calif. The heavy hemp rope is used to snub the hammer so that it forms the part under proper pressure and rises clear of the work after each operation. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

American military delegation calling on Haile Selassie. With his pet dog, Bull, alertly resting at his side, His Majesty, Haile Sellassie, Emperor of Ethiopia, was caught in this picture while reading an official report. These pictures are the first to be taken for publication since His Majesty's return to become a fighting member of the United Nations

American lend-lease equipment is playing a vital part in the development of United Nations mechanized forces. Here, an American light tank, to be used for training Australia's armored crews, is unloaded at an Australian port

American military delegation calling on Haile Sellassie. At the conclusion of the conference, His Majesty, Haile Sellassie, Emperor of Ethiopia, posed on the palace steps with the entire American delegation. They are, left to right: F. N. Polangin, Captain Conrad, Lieutenant Colonel Baughey, Colonels Bishop and Clark, George Strompl, Captain Powers, and Tafarra Worq. These pictures are the first to be taken for publication since His Majesty's return to become a fighting member of the United Nations

French warships refitted in U.S. ports to resume war on Axis. The 35,000-ton Richelieu, largest battleship of the French Navy, arrives at an East coast port of the United States after crossing the Atlantic from Dakar to be fitted out to resume the fight against the Axis. Three more French warships are in American ports for new equipment. Forty-two other units of the French navy are in action, or preparing to go into action, in the ranks of the United Nations

Lend-lease in action. American M-3 tanks, "General Grants," are in action in Africa and are preparing for battle in Australia. The picture shows an M-3 tank, lend-leased to the United Nations, being hoisted aboard a cargo vessel at an unnamed American port

American military delegation calling on Haile Selassie. Poring over official papers. At the left of His Majesty, Haile Selassie, Emperor of Ethiopia, is Colonel Bishop, while at the right, standing, is Colonel Clark. These pictures are the first to be taken for publication since His Majesty's return to become a fighting member of the United Nations

B-24 Liberator Bomber and C-87 Liberator Express. Super-transports such as this C-87 Liberator Express are carrying key personnel and vital cargo to all United Nations' war fronts. With a speed in excess of 300 miles per hour and a range of more than 3,000 miles, the C-87 can carry the greatest human or cargo load of any landplane now in mass production

American military delegation calling on Haile Selassie. His Majesty, Haile Selassie, emperor of Ethiopia, strolling in the Palace grounds. These pictures are the first to be taken for publication since His Majesty's return to become a fighting member of the United Nations

American military delegation calling on Haile Selassie. Before its audience with His Majesty, Haile Selassie, Emperor of Ethiopia, the American military delegation, paid a courtesy call on the British commanding officer of the Ethiopian area, Major General Samuel Butler, left. He is shown with Colonel Ewdin Clark, commanding officer of the U.S. Eritrean Service Command. These pictures are the first to be taken for publication since His Majesty's return to become a fighting member of the United Nations

Boeing Flying Fortresses. Guns bristling from turrets, these huge Boeing B-17Es are seen cruising high above the clouds. Described by the War Department as "bigger and more deadly" than any previous Flying Fortress, this plane marks the seventh Boeing B-17 type built for the Army since 1935. Armament includes heavy caliber power turrets on top and bottom of the all-metal fuselage, a deadly tail "stinger" turret, and side-mounted guns. These airplanes have been active in the Far East since Pearl Harbor, and are now serving the cause of the United Nations in every part of the world

Ambulances for lend-lease. Red Cross ambulances lined up on a freighter bound for Allied frontiers. They are being sent to the United Nations under lend-lease contracts

B-24 Liberator Bomber and C-87 Liberator Express. Super-transports such as this C-87 Liberator Express are carrying key personnel and vital cargo to all United Nations' war fronts. With a speed in excess of 300 miles per hour and a range of more than 3,000 miles, the C-87 can carry the greatest human or cargo load of any landplane now in mass production

Lend-lease shipments from the United States. This bow section of an American landing barge will be lifted aboard a waiting freighter for shipment to a United Nations battlefront

American military delegation calling on Haile Selassie. His Majesty, Haile Selassie, emperor of Ethiopia, photographed during a radio broadcast. These pictures are the first to be taken for publication since His Majesty's return to become a fighting member of the United Nations

American military delegation calling on Haile Selassie. In conference with the American delegation. Left to right: F. N. Plangin, Office of War Information (OWI); Lieutenant Colonel Robert M. Baughey; Colonel Edwin Clark; His Majesty, Haile Sellassie, Emperor of Ethiopia; Taffarra Worq (standing), and George Strompl. These picture are the first to be taken for publication since His Majesty's return to become a fighting member of the United Nations

India in the war. Girl workers in a booming Bombay textile mill. Thirty-five percent of India's great cotton textiles production, amounting to some 5,000,000,000 yards a year, is going into war materials for India and United Nations

Production. Tin smelting. Storage piles of slag at a Southern tin smelter that extracts the pure metal from South American ore. This slag is reintroduced to the smelting process as many times as it is able to yield up useful constituents. The large amount of pure tin produced at this plant serves to meet many of the countless war demands of the United Nations

How lend-lease strikes at the Axis. Parts of this twin-engine plane's wings have been removed before the plane is hoisted aboard a ship being loaded at an Atlantic coast port with American arms for one of the United Nations

Manpower. Southern shipyard workers. A keen eye and a steady hand guide Olie R. Cawethon in hobbing gears for ships of the United Nations. Cawethon, a former diesel engineer, answered the Navy's call for skilled workers, and is today operating a milling machine in a Southern Navy yard

New York, New York. "United Nations" exhibition of photographs presented by the United States Office of War Information (OWI) on Rockefeller Plaza

Training high school boys to identify planes. Instructor George Bowne of Weequahic High School, Newark, New Jersey, makes silhouette slides for his ceiling projections machine, by which his students learn to distinguish between planes of the United Nations and those of the Axis

Production. Tin smelting. A new furnace building under construction at a Southern tin smelter. Pure tin will be produced here from South American ore to meet the countless war needs of the United Nations. This smelting operation, the first of its magnitude in the United States, has already achieved a heavy output of the invaluable pure metal

Production. Tin smelting. A workman in a Southern tin smelter, protected from harmful dust by a respirator, trims a huge stockpile of ore just discharge from the crushers. A series of smelting operations will extract pure tin for the countless war needs of the United Nations. The raw ore comes to the plant in bags, direct from South American mines

First Chinese seamen granted shore leave in wartime America. Chinese seamen on United Nations' vessels may now obtain shore leave in American ports. Heretofore, because of the large number of desertions by Chinese crew members, alien seamen of Chinese nationality have been detained on board when their ships touched American ports. As a result of conferences between representatives of the Chinese Embassy, the Recruitment and Manning Organization of War Shipping Administration, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the Department of Justice, Chinese seamen may now be granted shore leave if guarantees are given that they will not desert. East meets West. Left to right: Coast Guardsman Vincent Pope, Bronx, New York; Coast Guardsman George Gilpin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Lee Ah Ding and Yee Chee Ching, Chinese seamen from a British freighter, meet at South Ferry, New York City. Lee and Yee are two of the first Chinese granted shore leave in an American port since this country entered the war

First Chinese seamen granted shore leave in wartime America. Chinese seamen on United Nations' vessels may now obtain shore leave in American ports. Heretofore, because of the large number of desertions by Chinese crew members, alien seamen of Chinese nationality have been detained on board when their ships touched American ports. As a result of conferences between representatives of the Chinese Embassy, the Recruitment and Manning Organization of War Shipping Administration, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the Department of Justice, Chinese seamen may now be granted shore leave if guarantees are given that they will not desert. East meets West. Left to right: Coast Guardsman Vincent Pope, Bronx, New York; Coast Guardsman George Gilpin, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Lee Ah Ding and Yee Chee Ching, Chinese seamen from a British freighter, meet at South Ferry, New York City. Lee and Yee are two of the first Chinese granted shore leave in an American port since this country entered the war

In North American's tank department, a woman employee rivets a rib. Tanks like these with high test gasoline enable United Nations bombers to fly faster and farther

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Colonel Drury, Royal Canadian Artillery; Colonel B. E. M. Diepenryck

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6th, 1942. Left to right: Naval Aviation Cadet John Edward Sinclaire, United States of America and Captain Chaudhuri, Military Aide to the Agent General for India

Production. Tin smelting. "Bars" of pure tin are stacked in the warehouse of a Southern smelter to await shipment for war uses. Each bar weighs about eighty pounds and has a value of about forty-one dollars and sixty cents at the present price of fifty- two cents per pound. This tin, made from South American ore, serves many needs of the United Nations

First Chinese seamen granted shore leave in wartime America. Chinese seamen on United Nations' vessels may now obtain shore leave in American ports. Heretofore, because of the large number of desertions by Chinese crew members, alien seamen of Chinese nationality have been detained on board when their ships touched American ports. As a result of conferences between representatives of the Chinese Embassy, the Recruitment and Manning Organization of War Shipping Administration, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the Department of Justice, Chinese seamen may now be granted shore leave if guarantees are given that they will not desert. Chinese messboy leaving a British ship for his first visit ashore to see his countrymen in America

Chinese soldiers of the United Nations forces in India register their pleasure upon receiving a shipment of regimental drums and bugles

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Kirksite is poured into a mold at the Inglewood, California, foundry of North American Aviation, Incorporated. The die that will be cast in this mold will be used in the forming of sheet metal parts for United Nations war planes. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Colonel O. Spaniel, Czechoslovakia; Colonel R. B. Larouche, Military Attache Haitian Legation

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6th, 1942. Left to right: Major Barayev, Assistant Military Attache, Russian Embassy; Major Reginald Williams, Military Attache, British Embassy; Major David Li, China Defense Supply

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Assembling controls for the United Nations war planes at the Inglewood, California plant of North American Aviation, Incorporated. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Production. Tin smelting. Emptying bags of raw tin ore from South America on a conveyor which feeds the crusher of a Southern smelter. The crusher reduces the larger particles to uniform size and discharges ore ready for the first stages of the smelting operation. The plant is already producing large quantities of tin for the countless war needs of the United Nations. Additional processing units now being added assure a much heavier output in the near future

War workers' ideas. Jury votes on war workers' ideas that save man-hours and critical materials. More than 400,000 suggestions to speed war production have been submitted to suggestion committees in war plants, and the outstanding ones tested and sent through more than 2,000 War Production Drive labor-management committees to the above Board for Individual Awards at War Production Drive headquarters in Washington. All ideas recognized by awards are made available to all American war plants and interested United Nations through the system of plow-back into industry as a further benefit to war production. The Board for Individual Awards, composed of engineers and technical experts who contribute their time to evaluating production ideas, is shown at a Washington session. Left to right: Charles B. Francis, Carnegie, Illinois Steel Corporation; Dr. J.L. Bray, Purdue University; Paul H. Stanley, Pitcairn Auto-Gyro Company; L.A. Poole of War Production Drive's Awards Field Operations Branch; Whiting Williams of Cleveland, Ohio; James B. Gent, United Steel Workers (USW) and William P. Hill, Bethlehem Steel

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Major M. V. Mishovich, Assistant Military Attache, Yugoslavia; Colonel O. Spaniel, Czechoslovakia; Major Stefan M. Dobrowolski, Assistant Military Attache, Polish Embassy; Captain Alfred Leondopoulos, Greek Naval Attache

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6th, 1942. Left to right: Lieutenant Commander Y. C. Yang, China; Commander J. Blaauboer, Royal Dutch Navy Reserve, Assistant Naval Attache

Manpower. Southern shipyard workers. A keen eye and a steady hand guide Olie R. Cawethon in hobbing gears for ships of the United Nations. Cawethon, a former diesel engineer, answered the Navy's call for skilled workers, and is today operating a milling machine in a Southern Navy yard

Production. Tin smelting. Acid tanks at a Southern tin smelter--the finest and most modern plant in the world. The acid is used in one of the processes of separating the tin from the impurities in the ore. Construction is still going on at this plant, which has already achieved a heavy output of the pure tin needed for countless war uses of the United Nations

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Women take over the operation of some of the heaviest tools at the Inglewood, Calfornia plant of North American Aviation Incorporated. Day and night, shifts of girl employees use this huge hydraulic press to form thousands of sheet metal parts for United Nations war planes. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid in Dieppe

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6th, 1942. Left to right: Major Barayev, Assistant Military Attache, Russian Embassy; Captain Chaudhuri, Military Aide to the Agent General for India

Production. Tin smelting. A sample of slag from one of the furnaces of a Southern tin smelting plant is tested to determine its tin content. After it has cooled, the sample is sent to the plant laboratory for analysis. At this smelter, the most modern plant of its kind in the world, pure tin is extracted from South American ore to meet the countless war demands of the United Nations

Production. Tin smelting. Workers at a Southern tin smelter removing ore from the leaching and bleaching processes and loading it in cars for the furnace. The raw ore comes to the plant in bags, direct from the South American mines and passes through a series of processes that result in the extraction of pure tin which serves countless war puposes of the United Nations

First Chinese seamen granted shore leave in wartime America. Chinese seamen on United Nations' vessels may now obtain shore leave in American ports. Heretofore, because of the large number of desertions by Chinese crew members, alien seamen of Chinese nationality have been detained on board when their ships touched American ports. As a result of conferences between representatives of the Chinese Embassy, the Recruitment and Manning Organization of War Shipping Administration, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the Department of Justice, Chinese seamen may now be granted shore leave if guarantees are given that they will not desert. Chinese Counsul General Lee (holding hat) greeting one of his countrymen from the crew of a British vessel in New York. Lee met the men on arrival and explained the rules under which, for the first time in warring America, they were permitted ashore during their ship's stay in port

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Stacks of vital aluminum in the Inglewood, California, plant of North American Aviation, Incorporated. From the receiving department they will be delivered to the proper departments for fabrication into war planes for the United Nations. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

First Chinese seamen granted shore leave in wartime America. Chinese seamen on United Nations' vessels may now obtain shore leave in American ports. Heretofore, because of the large number of desertions by Chinese crew members, alien seamen of Chinese nationality have been detained on board when their ships touched American ports. As a result of conferences between representatives of the Chinese Embassy, the Recruitment and Manning Organization of War Shipping Administration, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the Department of Justice, Chinese seamen may now be granted shore leave if guarantees are given that they will not desert. Chinese Counsul General Lee (left) greets a Chinese seaman of the crew of a British freighter in New York. Lee met the men on arrival and explained the rules under which, for the first time in warring America, they were permitted ashore during their ship's stay in port

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Kirksite is poured from a melting pot into a pouring ladle in the Inglewood, California, foundry of North American Aviation, Incorporated. This substance is molded into dies for the forming of sheet metal parts for United Nations war planes. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Production. Tin smelting. Pure tin for the countless war needs of the United Nations is produced from South American ore in this American smelter. The plant, recently built in a Southern city, is being rapidly enlarged to meet the heavy demand for the invaluable metal it produces. It is the finest and most modern tin smelter in the world

First Chinese seamen granted shore leave in wartime America. Chinese seamen on United Nations' vessels may now obtain shore leave in American ports. Heretofore, because of the large number of desertions by Chinese crew members, alien seamen of Chinese nationality have been detained on board when their ships touched American ports. As a result of conferences between representatives of the Chinese Embassy, the Recruitment and Manning Organization of War Shipping Administration, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the Department of Justice, Chinese seamen may now be granted shore leave if guarantees are given that they will not desert. Lee Ah Ding (left), engine crew member of a British vessel, and Yee Chee Ching, seaman, start down the gangway to visit New York after their officer (rear) told them they might go ashore. Previously, terms of the new agreement were explained to them, and customs and other formalities were straightened out

Americans all. Philip Leung, Chinese, works on a powerful air-cooled aircraft engine alongside a young white worker. Leung, eighteen, came to this country four years ago and has a mother and two sisters in China, whom he helps by sending part of his wages. He is also helping to free their country by building fighting planes for the United Nations. Republic Aircraft Corporation

Production. Tin smelting. "Bars" of pure tin are stacked in the warehouse of a Southern smelter to await shipment for war uses. Each bar weighs about eighty pounds and has a value of about forty-one dollars and sixty cents at the present price of fifty- two cents per pound. This tin, made from South American ore, serves many needs of the United Nations

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Hundreds of Kirksite and lead dies are stocked in this huge storage area at the Inglewood, California, foundry of North American Aviation, Incorporated. They move from this yard into the adjoining drip hammer department where they are used in forming sheet metal parts for United Nations war planes. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Production. Tin smelting. Long tubes carry all the smoke thrown off by the furnaces of a Southern tin smelter to Cottrell precipitator units. Here all tin carried in the smoke is removed by an electrical current of 65,000 volts, and added to the metal secured more directly in other stages of the process. The large amounts of pure tin recovered from South American ore in this plant serves countless war purposes of the United Nations

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Bars of Kirksite metal, ready to be placed in the melting pot for use in dies, stand outside the foundry at the Inglewood, California, foundry of North American Aviation, Incorporated. Dies of this metal are used in forming sheet metal parts of war planes for the United Nations. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Production. Tin smelting. Unstacking bags of raw tin ore from South America and feeding the material to the crusher of a Southern smelter. The crusher reduces the larger particles to uniform size and discharges ore ready for the first stages of the smelting operation. The plant is already producing large quantities of tin for the countless war needs of the United Nations. Additional processing units now being added assure a much heavier output in the near future

American tanks thunder down an English plain during group maneuvers. These are the modern juggernauts that are rolling up United Nations victories in the European theater

The uniforms are different, but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Squadron Leader Lowry, Royal Air Force; Miss Barbara Brady; Pilot Officer James, RAF (Royal Air Force); Squadron Leader Lee, RAF

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Colonel Felix Castellano, Military Attache, Guatemala; Lieutenant Colonel Felipe Munilla, Cuba; Colonel Hermogenes Prado, Nicaragua; St. Colonel J. C. Velasquez, Philippines; Captain Felipe Cardenas, Cuba; Major General Basilio Valdes, Philippines; Colonel Manolo Nieto, Philippines; Major Herman Baron, Military Attache, El Salvador

Production. Tin smelting. Raw tin from South American mines is stored at a Southern smelter where the pure metal will be extracted to meet the countless war needs of the United Nations. Each stack of bags represents a fifteen thousand dollar value

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6th, 1942. Left to right: Captain J. G. Gayral, France; Commander Skriagin, Russia; Captain W. Jameson, Assistant Naval Attache, British Embassy

Production. Aircraft engines. Final touch-up of airplane motors takes place in one of the Midwest's largest airplane plants. These engines will see duty over Berlin, Tokyo and other points of vital interest to the United Nations

The uniforms are different, but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Three shifts of girl operators keep this huge toggle press producing plane parts in the Inglewood, California plant of North American Aviation Incorporated. The young woman is removing one of the thousands of sheet metal parts for United Nations war planes. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Lieutenant W. Van der Weyde, Royal Netherlands Army Reserve; Lieutenant L. R. Lund, Norway Navy; Lieutenant Commander Y. C. Yang, China

Manpower. Americans all. Their common hatred of fascism bridges the gulf in ancestory of these two Americans, one of Irish descent, the other born in Rumania. Working together with one urgent goal uppermost in mind - victory for the United Nations. J.Powers (left) and J.M. Deli are processing parts for America's medium tanks in a Midwest tank plant. Pressed Steel Can Company, Chicago, Illinois

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Lieutenant Colonel P.A. Jose Perez Allende, Mexican Air Corps; General Sanchez Hernandez, Mexico; Lieutenant Sagarra, Mexican Navy

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6th, 1942. Left to right: Commander J. Blaauboer, Royal Dutch Navy Reserve, Assistant Naval Attache; Lieutenant W. Van der Weyde, Royal Netherlands Army Reserve

Harvest for Hitler. Ed Sundholm, a veteran of World War I, at work in the war plant which he transformed from a peaceful dairy farm into an arsenal of victory for the United Nations. The cows won't come home, says Mr. Sundholm, until this two-hundred fifteen thousand dollar near Albert City, Iowa no longer turns out shells to smash the Axis

Manpower. Southern shipyard workers. A keen eye and a steady hand guide Olie R. Cawethon in hobbing gears for ships of the United Nations. Cawethon, a former diesel engineer, answered the Navy's call for skilled workers, and is today operating a milling machine in a Southern Navy yard

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Vital stocks of metal bars used in the Inglewood, California, machine shops of North American Aviation, Incorporated, are stored in the receiving stockroom prior to use. They will be fabricated into parts for the United Nations war planes. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Joe Cobb, former "fat boy" in the original "Our Gang" comedy, now helps build North American B-25 bombers for the United Nations

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Sheet metal parts for United Nations war planes are best treated in great ovens as quickly as they are formed on the hydraulic and toggle presses at the Inglewood, California plant of North American Aviation, Incorporated. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Huge drop hammers work day and night forming sheet metal parts for United Nations bombers and fighters at the Inglewood, California, plant of North American Aviation, Incorporated. The heavy hemp rope is used to snub the hammer so that it forms the part under proper pressure and rises clear of the work after each operation. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo, and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Swedish-American vice president of the SKF roller bearing factory with his family. His wife is the daughter of the Swedish minister to the United Nations

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Lieutenant Colonel Sutton, Australia; Major Barayev, Assistant Military Attache, Russian Embassy; Colonel O. Spaniel, Czecholslovakia; Major Stefan M. Dobrowolski, Assistant Military Attache, Polish Embassy; Major M. V. Mishovich, Assistant Military Attache, Yugoslavia; Captain Alfred Leondopoulos

Production. Milling machines and machine castings. On their way to work for victory. Each of these cases contains a machine tool bound for some armament or war materials manufacturing plant somewhere in the territory of the United Nations

Production. Tin smelting. A sample of slag from one of the furnaces of a Southern tin smelting plant is tested to determine its tin content. After it has cooled, the sample is sent to the plant laboratory for analysis. At this smelter, the most modern plant of its kind in the world, pure tin is extracted from South American ore to meet the countless war demands of the United Nations

Production. Tin smelting. A sample of slag from one of the furnaces of a Southern tin smelting plant is tested to determine its tin content. After it has cooled, the sample is sent to the plant laboratory for analysis. At this smelter, the most modern plant of its kind in the world, pure tin is extracted from South American ore to meet the countless war demands of the United Nations

Sturdy cargo ships fill the sea lanes leading to all fronts, bearing guns, tanks, and planes for the United Nations. The Liberty ships are visible in this section of the convoy

First Chinese seamen granted shore leave in wartime America. Chinese seamen on United Nations' vessels may now obtain shore leave in American ports. Heretofore, because of the large number of desertions by Chinese crew members, alien seamen of Chinese nationality have been detained on board when their ships touched American ports. As a result of conferences between representatives of the Chinese Embassy, the Recruitment and Manning Organization of War Shipping Administration, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the Department of Justice, Chinese seamen may now be granted shore leave if guarantees are given that they will not desert. Lee Ah Ding, Chinese seaman from the crew of a British cargo boat, is shown outside the gates of the dock getting his first glimpse of wartime America from the inside

Washington, D.C. Representatives of 26 United Nations at Flag day ceremonies in the White House to reaffirm their pact. Seated, left to right: Dr. Francisco Castillo Najera, Ambassador of Mexico; President Roosevelt; Manuel Quezon, President of the Philippine Islands; and Secretary of State Cordell Hull

Production. Tin smelting. Tin ore just discharged from the crusher of a Southern smelter is stored in large stockpiles in readiness for further operations in the extraction of pure tin for the countless war needs of the United Nations. The raw ore is shipped in bags direct from mines in South Africa

Production. Tin smelting. Tin is recovered from smelting furnace smoke in a Southern operation that produces pure tin from South American ore. All the smoke from the furnace is carried by long tubes to Cottrell precipitating units as shown. Here an electrical current of 65,000 volts throws out all the tin held in the smoke, and makes a valuable addition to the supplies of tin now needed for the countless critical war uses of the United Nations

Production. Airplane manufacture, general. Sheet aluminum stock in the Inglewood, California, receiving stores department of North American Aviation, Incorporated, is placed on an overhead conveyor platform to be delivered to the material preparation department. These sheets will be fabricated into parts for the United Nations war planes. This plant produces the battle-tested B-25 ("Billy Mitchell") bomber, used in General Doolittle's raid on Tokyo and the P-51 ("Mustang") fighter plane, which was first brought into prominence by the British raid on Dieppe

United effort poster. The united effort of the American people to match the Axis by fulfilling the production needs of the United Nations is illustrated in this poster issued by the War Production Board (WPB). These posters are being delivered to war factories throughout the nation. The field of the poster is white with printing in red, blue and black. Its measurements are 28 x 40 in.

First Chinese seamen granted shore leave in wartime America. Chinese seamen on United Nations' vessels may now obtain shore leave in American ports. Heretofore, because of the large number of desertions by Chinese crew members, alien seamen of Chinese nationality have been detained on board when their ships touched American ports. As a result of conferences between representatives of the Chinese Embassy, the Recruitment and Manning Organization of War Shipping Administration, and the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the Department of Justice, Chinese seamen may now be granted shore leave if guarantees are given that they will not desert. After delivering the captain's laundry, this Chinese messboy aboard a British vessel will have his first visit in New York. He is one of a number of Chinese seamen who were recently permitted shore leave for the first time in the United States under wartime conditions

The uniforms are different but the cause is the same. Officers of the United Nations attend a garden party of the United Nations Club at Dumbarton Oaks, Sunday, September 6, 1942. Left to right: Colonel B. E. M. Pierre Diepenryck, Military Attache, Belgium; Adjudant de la Salle, France; Madamoiselle S. L., private in the Volontaires, women's equivalent in the Fighting French of the WAAF or Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC). This woman has relatives in occupied France and does not want her name mentioned; Lieutenant Dumont, France

War workers' ideas. Jury votes on war workers' ideas that save man-hours and critical materials. More than 400,000 suggestions to speed war production have been submitted to suggestion committees in war plants, and the outstanding ones tested and sent through more than 2,000 War Production Drive labor-management committees to the above Board for Individual Awards at War Production Drive headquarters in Washington. All ideas recognized by awards are made available to all American war plants and interested United Nations through the system of plow-back into industry as a further benefit to war production

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