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Inflation. Almost too recent and painful to recall--dark days in America's 1930 depression. Men this side of the sign are assured of a five-cent meal--the rest must wait for generous passersby

Inflation. Aftermath of inflation--a foreclosure tale in Iowa in the early 1930s when "the bottom fell out of everything." Military police were on hand to keep farmers from preventing the auction

Work projects: Enrollee William L. Cross, Appalachia, Va., climbing up on scaffold erected for assembling a prefabricated building which is to be a camp work shop

Washington, D.C. A woman doing handwork in her bedroom. Some hand-crochet work is lying on a dresser back of her and also in a work basket beside her

Cartoon by Miyamoto, U.S. Army. Shown here is one of the many cartoons drawn by Private Miyamoto, cartoonist, of the Nineth Armored Division. Miyamoto is twenty-two years old and is an American-born citizen of San Francisco. His parents are in a relocation center. He is now special duty with the public relations section of his division

Indian troops in East Africa. Three tanks engaged in training personnel at a Fighting Vehicles School somewhere in India

One year of reciprocal aid. Food is probably the most important contribution of Australia to the supplies of the U.S. armed forces stationed in the Pacific. She sent shiploads to our beleaguered men at Bataan and has increased her contributions as the size of our forces has grown. The U.S. ships practically no food to our troops in Australia and New Zealand. The Americans are supplied on the spot, and the space thus freed in our ships is used for tanks, planes and amunitions

Convoy. A scout plane from the aircraft carrier USS Ranger returns from a patrol flight of the area of the sea through which a convoy is passing. The efficient work of planes like this accounts in large measure for the relatively few ships that are successfully attacked by submarine wolf packs

Agriculture chart. One of a series of ten charts released by the Bureau of Home Economics, Department of Agriculture. A limited number are on sale at twenty-five cents for a set of ten at the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office (GPO), Washington, D.C

Archbishop Spellman of New York and Brigadier General Auby C. Strickland, U.S. Army 9th Air Forces, view ruins of Chapel of Franciscan Missionaries in Tripoli recently damaged by German night bombers. Monsignor Spellman was guest of General Strickland during his visit to Tripoli

Lend-lease to Britain. Telephone coils, part of a shipment of lend-lease materials shipped to England by the United States, are unpacked at an ordnance depot in the Midlands

Chrysler tank arsenal. Off for a trial run. Each completed M-3 tank gets a seventy-five mile test run over all sorts of rough terrain. The proving ground adjoins the huge Chrysler tank arsenal near Detroit where these twenty-eight ton behemoths are produced

Production. Copper. Copper ore travelling on belt conveyors at one of the large copper concentrators of the Utah Copper Company. The Utah Copper Company iron detectors straddling the conveyors automatically stop the operation when tramp iron is detected in the ore

Plant a victory garden. Poster distributed by the Office of War Information to libraries, museums post offices. The original is 22 inches and is printed in full color. The poster was designed by Robert Gwathmey, mural artist. Copies are obtainable from Division of Public Inquiries, OWI, 14th and Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C

Mr. Charles M. Schoenlaub

Lend-Lease to Britain. American-made 38-caliber revolvers shipped to England from the United States under lend-lease are unpacked at an English ordnance depot

Steel alloy manufacture. Allegheny Ludlum Steel Corporation, Brackenridge, Pennsylvania. Quality in the manufacture of steel requires constant control and research. This chemist is weighing the elements of a steel alloy to determine its exact composition. Analysis is determined to 11000 of 1 percent of each element in the alloy

Troops in Australia. Under cover of tall grass, Australian troops crouch behind an American light tank in fighting at Buna. This picture, taken during actual warfare, shows infantrymen following up the tank as it advances to clear out Japanese pillboxes on the edge of Semini Creek

African natives prepare for air attack. Guarding against possible enemy attacks in Africa, crack veterans of the Battle of Britain are instructing African natives in anti-aircraft units. With an Allied plane as the target, the natives receive actual combat practice by firing directly at the plane rather than ahead of it. The pattern of shell bursts behind the plane is easily scored in this manner without the use of a sleeve target

American food for British workers. Ship repairers at the Surrey Docks open a tin of American meat to make sandwiches for their lunch

One of a series of special posters produced and displayed by Douglas Aircraft Company Incorporated as part of its material conservation program

8th Army in Tripoli. Time out on the road to Tripoli for a veteran tank crew of the British 8th Army. Cleaning their revolvers for action

Production. Copper. Disc-type filters which remove moisture from the copper concentrates at the Arthur mill of the Utah Copper Company. Following this treatment the ore is ready for shipment to the Garfield, Utah smelter of the American Smelting and Refining Company

A.E. Bowman

8th Army in Tripoli. Royal Air Force Rescue launch speedboat to action from a desert port on the Mediterranean during the Tripoli campaign

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). These are partially completed M-3 tanks, twenty-eight ton steel giants being turned out at the huge Chrysler tank arsenal in Detroit. The camera was directed toward the end of the three main assembly lines. Mass assembly methods developed in automobile manufacture are used. Note overhead cranes for heavy parts

Production. Copper. Copper ore being discharged through a portable feeder into the fine ore bins at the Arthur, Utah copper concentrator of the Utah Copper Company

Mr. C.A. Fassen

Boeing Flying Fortresses. Latest Boeing Flying Fortresses.This, the newest and most formidable in the Boeing Flying Fortress series, is the B-17E described by the War Department as "bigger and more deadly" than any of its predecessors. This new airplane, key weapon in America's war program, is now in mass production at the Boeing Aircraft Company. Under a special tri-company production pool arrangement, it is also being built in quantity by the Douglas Aircraft Company and by the Vega Aircraft Company, a subsidiary of Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

Harold Rowe

8th Army in Tripoli. Warehouse on the Spanish Mole, on Tripoli's harbor, managed by U.S. Army 9th Air Force bombers during the attack on Tripoli

India in the war. Indian soldiers in action before the capture of Keren. This gun hurled approximately 24,000 shells a day. Note the shadow of camouflage on the field gun

8th Army in Tripoli. Lumbering up the hills near Salum in North Africa, truckloads of British 8th Army soldiers move westward into Tunisia in the early part of the Tripoli campaign

Ben W. Lewis, chief economist, Consumer Division, National Office for Price Administration (OPA). Former association: Professor of Economics, Oberlin College; chief economist, Consumers Counsel Division, U.S. Department of Interior

War Production Board poster. Poster distributed by the WPB to war plants. The original is 28 12 inches by 40 inches and is printed in black and yellow. It was reproduced from a photograph by Alfred T. Palmer, Office of War Information (OWI) staff photographer. Copies may be obtained from War Production Drive Headquarters, War Production Board, Washington, D.C

A graphic portrayal of plant waste of materials is presented in this conservation poster displayed by the labor-management committee

Agriculture chart. One of a series of ten charts released by the Bureau of Home Economics, Department of Agriculture. A limited number are on sale at twenty-five cents for a set of ten at the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office (GPO), Washington, D.C

8th Army in Tripoli. A Royal Air Force salvage unit plows through mud and water carrying replacement parts which will return a damaged plane to action in the Tripoli campaign

Mr. John E. Organ

Follow safety rules. Poster distributed by War Production Board (WPB) to war plants. The original is 22 inches and is printed in full color. Copies may be obtained from War Production Drive Headquarters, 1210 Raleigh Hotel, Washington, D.C

Harold Rowe

Steel manufacture, Allegheny-Ludlum. Engineers must be alert at all times, to see that the bearings coupling the mill engines are kept oiled. Negligence might mean long delays in steel production. The engineer above is adjusting the valve of the oil line to increase the flow (note the huge fly-wheel in the background)

Troops in Australia. American tanks, manned by Australian crews, led the attack on Buna. This picture, taken during the fighting, shows the thick tropical growth under which the battle was fought. A chain of heavily fortified Japanese pillboxes was smashed by the tanks

Lend-Lease to Britain. Radio outfits shipped from the United States under lend-lease arrive at an ordnance depot in England. They include reception sets spare valves and (on shelf) American tank radio sets

war ration book number two. The cover of the war ration book number two

African natives prepare for air attack. Guarding against possible enemy attacks in Africa, crack veterans of the Battle of Britain are instructing African natives in anti-aircraft units. In the foreground, officers in the command post keep their eyes on the target as the gun immediately ahead of them fires. The command post is referred to as the "Brain Trust" by the gunners

Arthur Upson

Lend-Lease to Britain. American tank transporter, shipped to England under lend-lease goes into service at a central ordnance depot in the English Midlands

Mr. Maury Maverick

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). These are partially completed M-3 tanks, thirty-eight ton steel giants being turned out at the huge Chrysler tank arsenal in Detroit. The camera was directed toward the end of the three main assembly lines. Mass assembly methods developed on automobile manufacture are used. Note overhead cranes for heavy parts

During the thick of the fighting at Buna, an Australian infantryman receives a handful of grenades from a fellow soldier inside the tank. American tanks manned by Australian crews, carried large quantities of grenades which were distributed to the infantry. This picture was made during the actual fighting

Mr. Raymond J. Wendell

G. Griffith Johnson

Chrysler tank arsenal. Thousands of rivets are used in the production of one of the huge thirty-eight ton M-3 tanks. Whenever possible rivets are replaced by welded sections, but throughout much of the tank, as in the side plates on which this riveter is working, the steel plate is too heavy for welding. The riveting itself, a twenty-five ton

8th Army in Tripoli. At a British 8th Army fuel depot in the Western desert of North Africa a truckload of British Tommies stops while the driver refuels. Squares of gasoline cans, evenly spaced, are spread out across the flat land, as far as the eye can reach in preparation for the Tripoli campaign in North Africa

Mr. Leon Davidson

Chrysler tank arsenal. Testing is through at the proving grounds adjoining the Chrysler tank arsenal, near Detroit. This is one of the twenty-eight ton M-3 tanks, the steel monsters which will make our mechanized forces the equal of any in the world in tank warfare. The lower of the two barrels is that of a 75 mm warfare gun, the upper of a 47 mm. anti-aircraft gun, both standard equipment on these tanks. In addition, four machine guns are mounted on each M-3

Production. Copper. A closeup of a disc-type filter showing how the dried copper concentrate is broken by expansion of the filter and then discharged. This filter unit is at the Arthur plant of the Utah Copper Company

Cartoon by Miyamoto, U.S. Army. Shown here is one of the many cartoons drawn by Private Miyamoto, cartoonist, of the Nineth Armored Division. Miyamoto is twenty-two years old and is an American-born citizen of San Francisco. His parents are in a relocation center. He is now special duty with the public relations section of his division

Defense housing. The first section of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) experimental trailer-house is backed up onto its foundation in the mountains of North Carolina. The section is equipped with wheels on the underside, the foundation is equipped with tracks. The wheels are placed on the tracks and half a house rolls into

Member of the Order of the British Empire. Decorated for continuous gallantry and devotion to duty while under fire in the East African campaign, Regimental Sergeant Major LIanyier Dagarti of the Gold Coast Regiment, Royal West African Frontier Force, was the first Gold Coast soldier to receive the M.B.E (Member of the Order of the British Empire) in this war. His magnificent example of coolness and courage inspired in his batallion into action at Bulo Erillo and Uodors. Nineteen years in the service he holds Good Conduct and Long Service medals

Aircraft. Naval. The Navy's "Coronado" (PB2Y-2) was designed by Consolidated for long-range patrol and transport missions. It is an all-metal, high-wing flying boat powered by four Pratt and Whitney engines of 1,200 horsepower each. Its speed is over 200 miles per hour, its range over 3,000 miles, its service ceiling approximately 20,000 feet, its load capacity 30,000 pounds. It carries a crew of ten men armed with 50-caliber machine guns and bombs

Building a new Army camp at top speed. New camps are being built with great rapidity all over the country to house not only Britain's rapidly expanding Army, but the thousands of U.S. and Canadian troops now arriving. The work is done by civilian contractors, but the Army garrison engineer is in constant supervision to see that work is as specified and that it is completed on time. Leveling soil ready to receive a concrete floor

War Production Board poster (WPB). "Beware Jap-Germs." This is one of a series of "Jap-Germs" posters that were spread through the Westinghouse plant at Bloomfield, New Jersey, under the auspices of the labor-management committee. The two-headed figure, the Jap-Germ, was featured in all posters of the series which warned against sabotage and encouraged the objectives of the war production drive

Lend-lease to Britain. Cases of American spare parts arriving at an English ordnance center as part of a lend-lease shipment from the United States are moved to the stores for unloading. English girls, driving trucks, help with the task

Milo Perkins

One year of reciprocal aid. Australia has built many facilities for the American forces, including airfields, barracks and motor vehicles. Here is shown the largest airfield in Australia, covering some forty square miles, with repair hangers, workshops and living quarters. This is one of 100 such fields built in Australia to service the U.S. planes

Mr. J.A. Krug

Allied military conference in India. At the recent military conferences in India, where Allied leaders met to plan joint strategy. General H.H. Arnold (left), chief of U.S. Army Air Forces, stops to talk things over with Field Marshal Sir John Dill, a member of the Allied Joint Staff in Washington, D.C

New type oil refining plant on property of Union Oil, a far western oil company

Two valuable resources of the Southwest--rich oil fields and fine grazing land. In this scene near Norwalk, California oil wells rear their imposing structures over a herd of cows on one of the state's dairy farms

Ship repairers at Surrey Docks, England, making sandwiches for their lunch from American canned meat

Sea jeeps. Successfully crossing a fast-flowing stream, the Ford-built amphibian, with full complement of four soldiers, easily climbs opposite shore and is ready for any scouting operations. Picture shows maneuvers recently held in the Detroit area, when soldiers from Fort Wayne in full combat dress manned the machines. The controls of the new Army transportation unit for land operations are identical to the quarter-ton, four-wheel drive reconnaissance car, and no steering changeover is required from land to water operation. The new car is being used by U.S. fighting forces in war zones

Ray C. Ellis

Cartoon by Miyamoto, U.S. Army. Shown here is one of the many cartoons drawn by Private Miyamoto, cartoonist, of the Nineth Armored Division. Miyamoto is twenty-two years old and is an American-born citizen of San Francisco. His parents are in a relocation center. He is now special duty with the public relations section of his division

Dr. W.S.A. Pott, secretary of Priorities Division, Office of Production Management (OPM)

How lend-lease strikes at the Axis. A lend-lease tank coming over the side of a cargo ship in a United States Atlantic Coast port. Many tanks are carried as deck-load

American troops on way to Liberia, Africa. The American soldiers shown here on the deck of a transport, composed chiefly of Negro units, are headed for Liberia, African Negro Republic, after the U.S. government entered into an defense agreement with Liberia. Air bases are being established for the protection of the country, which was founded in 1821 by Negro freedmen under the auspices of the United States

Steel alloy manufacture. Allegheny Ludlum Steel Corporation, Brackenridge, Pennsylvania. Open hearth steel is also made at this plant. Workers here shown are completing the charge to an open hearth furnace which has a capacity of about 100 tons per heat. Only small quantities of materials are charged by hand in this way. The bulk of the material is charged by the mechanism shown in pictures nos. D-995 and D-994

Lend-lease shipments from the United States. This bow section of an American landing barge will be lifted aboard a waiting freighter for shipment to a United Nations battlefront

Production. Copper. Copper concentrates storage bins at the Garfield, Utah smelter of the American Smelting and Refining Company

Steel manufacture, Allegheny-Ludlum. This slab of stainless steel is being rolled by a three-high 100 inch plate mill to bring it to the proper length, finish, thickness and width. It will eventually be used as tank armor

8th Army in Tripoli. Faces of Tripoli's residents as they watch the arrival of the British army

African natives prepare for air attack. Guarding against possible enemy attacks in Africa, British troops are training African natives in anti-aircraft units. The instructors, veterans of the Battle of Britain, have found the natives apt students and cool under fire. An African unit is shown loading one of the thirty-seven millimeter ack-ack guns under the supervision of British non-commissioned officers and commissioned officers

With an airfield security detachment in Hawaii. Operating anti-aircraft machinery in a dugout with an airfeild security detachment in Hawaii are (left to right): Corporal Harvey Jones, New York City; Private Samuel Moffitt, Siler City, North Carolina; Private Jay G. Pappy, New York City; Private First Class James Masfield, New York City; Private Walter Johnson, New York City and Private Walter Phillips, New York City

Elmer Davis, Director, Office of War Information (OWI)

A.J. Browning, deputy director, Division of Purchases, Office of Production Management (OPM)

Paul Porter welcoming I. Chance Buchanan on new job. Buchanan was recently appointed head of the Alexandria-Arlington defense rental area

Donald M. Nelson, chairman, War Production Board (WPB)

Steel manufacture, Allegheny-Ludlum. Pig iron such as this is a major ingredient of steel. Blast furnaces have smelted down the iron ore to obtain the pig iron used in all three types of steel furnaces: open hearth, Bessemer converter, and electric

Left: Helen Barnard, research assistant, Consumer Division, Office of Price Administration (OPA). Right: Caroline F. Ware, head of Program Materials Unit of the Consumer Relation Section of the Consumer Division, OPA

The "General Grant" of Libya. The American General Grant tank named after the great Civil War leader being replenished with ammunition. It went into action in the Battle of Knightsbridge and dealt out heavy punishment to Rommel's panzers

Sea jeeps. The Army's most flexible new machine of the war, a Ford-built amphibian reconnaissance car, carrying soldiers equipped for combat duty takes to the water in special tests staged recently in the Detroit area. This picture shows how the new transportation arm propelling itself as a boat to the opposite shore. The boat steers in the water the same as on land

Mr. Wendell Wilkie in West Africa enroute for Middle East: meeting with Lord Swinton. Mr. Wendell Wilkie, representative of President Roosevelt, passed through British West Africa on his way to the Middle East. During his brief stay in the Gold Coast, Mr. Wilkie had an informal meeting with Lord Swinton, Resident Minister in West Africa

Inflation. Even before they declared themselves free and independent states, American colonies issued New York Dollars and Pennsylvania Shillings, then later Continental Dollars--all so largely un-supported by metallic standards that soon any worthless object came to be known as "Not worth a Continental."

Lend-lease share of 1942 food supply. A graphic chart issued by the Office of War Information (OWI) showing the percentages of domestic supply of principal foods absorbed by lend-lease shipments

Mr. J.L. Higginbotham

U.S. desert airmen check bombing plans. The crew of an U.S. Army Air Force B-25 bomber check their flight plans at a desert air base before taking off to bomb advance Axis position. They are (left to right) Lieutenant Bob Hill, Clear Lake, Iowa, bombardier; Lieutenant Bill Brytan, Denton, Texas, pilot; Lieutenant Jack Cross, Austin, Texas, navigator (he's checking the time); and Lieutenant Don Castle, Saint Joseph, Missouri, co-pilot; (crew member in rear is unidentified)

Building a new army camp at top speed. Now camps are being built with great rapidity all over the country to house not only Britain's rapidly expanding Army, but the many thousands of American and Canadian troops now arriving. The work is done by civilian contractors, but the army garrison engineer is in constant supervision to see that the work is as specified and that it is completed on time. Bricking the ends of a Nissen Hut. In the foreground men are mixing mortar for bricking

Indian troops in East Africa. Here are some ... of Indian soldiers, restored to health at the depot, lined up prior to their discharge