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16th century mechanized warfare

[2 illus. of warfare of Canadian Indians]

[2 illus. of warfare of Canadian Indians]

Le Colonel Rampon à la tete de la 32° demi-brigade, défend la redoute de Montelegino. 10 Avril 1796 peint par Bagetti ; gravé par Skelton

The war began in earnest. A midnight march. Movement upon Alexandria and the Virginia Heights. Brutal assassination of Col. Ellsworth in Alexandria. A swift and terrible retribution.

Mississippian Extra.

Three hundred thousand more.

To the Army of the Potomac.

President Lincoln and General Grant on peace and war.

The Celebrated "Bixby" letter. [Facsimile.]

Uncle Abe. "Hello! Ben, is that you? Glad to see you!" Butler. "Yes Uncle Abe. Got through with that New Orleans job. Cleaned them out and scrubbed them up! Any more scrubbing to give out?"

Journal-- Ext, [newspaper]. April 15th, 1865.

Surrender of Gen. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia.

Gazette Extra, [newspaper]. Chattanooga, April 15.

Gorilla warfare under the protection of the American flag / F. Opper.

Jungle warfare

Mexico - victims of warfare

See real warfare - "over there" cantonment - made possible by blood-not money 5th Regiment Armory, Baltimore - tickets for sale here / / Lloyd Harrison ; H Gamse & Bro. Litho. Balto. Md.

U.S. Marines in France Digging in. Training for modern warfare consists mostly in digging one trench after another, and our boys, realizing the importance of this training, go at it with a will.

Pushed sale of implements of industrial warfare, Washington, D.C. Sept. 24. Questioned by the Senate Committee investigating espionage in labor relations today, A.F. Ailes, executive of the Lake Erie Chemical Co., told of an inteensive drive that was made to sell implements of industrial warfare shortly after the C.I.O. began its campaign to unionize the steel industry. Ailes admitted he took part in a demonstration tear and nauseating gases last July for officials of the Pennsylvania Railway, Jones and Laughlin Steel Co., Erie Railroad, Westinghouse Electric Co., and the Carnegie Steel Co., but he said no sales resulted

Pushed sale of implements of industrial warfare, Washington, D.C. Sept. 24. Questioned by the Senate Committee investigating espionage in labor relations today, A.F. Ailes, executive of the Lake Erie Chemical Co., told of an inteensive drive that was made to sell implements of industrial warfare shortly after the C.I.O. began its campaign to unionize the steel industry. Ailes admitted he took part in a demonstration tear and nauseating gases last July for officials of the Pennsylvania Railway, Jones and Laughlin Steel Co., Erie Railroad, Westinghouse Electric Co., and the Carnegie Steel Co., but he said no sales resulted

Sailor at the Naval Air Base wears the new type protective clothing and gas mask designed for use in chemical warfare, Corpus Christi, Texas. These uniforms are lighter than the old type

The M-7 is the Army's newest tank destroyer and is being given the acid test for desert warfare in the maneuvers near Iron Mountains, California. Colonel R. Downing of DeKalb, Missouri, Corporal L. Roberts from Graham, Texas, and Lieutenant M. Hutchison, Enterprise, Alabama. For firing power, the M-7 has a 105 mm Howitzer and a 50 caliber automatic gun. Iron Mountains, California.

The M-7 is the Army's newest tank destroyer and is really a "killer." Being tested for desert warfare at Iron Mountains, California. It carries both a 105mm Howitzer and a 50 caliber gun. Lieutenant M. Hutchison of Enterprise, Alabama is at the extreme right. Corporal L. Roberts from Graham, Texas is at post behind the Howitzer. Corporal Downing, whose home is Dekalb, Missouri, is in the turret

Chrysler tank arsenal. Testing is through at the proving grounds adjoining the Chrysler tank arsenal, near Detroit. This is one of the twenty-eight ton M-3 tanks, the steel monsters which will make our mechanized forces the equal of any in the world in tank warfare. The lower of the two barrels is that of a 75 mm warfare gun, the upper of a 47 mm. anti-aircraft gun, both standard equipment on these tanks. In addition, four machine guns are mounted on each M-3

Troops in Australia. Under cover of tall grass, Australian troops crouch behind an American light tank in fighting at Buna. This picture, taken during actual warfare, shows infantrymen following up the tank as it advances to clear out Japanese pillboxes on the edge of Semini Creek

Tank manufacture (Chrysler). Test is thorough at the proving grounds adjoining the Chrysler tank arsenal near Detroit. These are twenty-eight ton M-3 tanks, the steel monster which will make our mechanized forces the equal of any in the world in tank warfare. The lower of the two gun barrels is that of a 75 mm. gun, the upper of a 37 mm. anti-aircraft gun, both standard equipment on these tanks. In addition, four machine guns are mounted on each M-3

Australian fighting forces in action at Papua. Infantrymen advance as an Australian-manned American tank blast Japanese pillboxes and clear trees of snipers. In one morning's fighting this tank's machine guns fired 10,000 rounds. The picture was taken during actual warfare

Halftrac scout cars. Under the skilled hands of trained workers, the engine for an Army halftrac scout car begins to take form. Each of its parts is built to stand up under the conditions imposed by modern warfare on mechanized equipment. White Motor Company, Cleveland, Ohio

Science and research. Mineral prospecting. A ground comparator will reveal the presence of an ore body under the surface of the earth by measuring the total intensity and the plane of polarization of the secondary electro-magnetic field set up by the ore body. These students are using an adjustable coil of copper wire which acts as an electrical transformer, and may be tilted to determine the minimum and maximum intensity of the field. They are conducting an experiment in electronics, taught in the department of geophysics at a famous mining engineering school. They will apply the knowledge they are acquiring to airplane detection and anti-submarine warfare. Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado

Flags flies over PT boat. In sea warfare since Pearl Harbor, the Navy tinset PT boats have frequently proved to be a deadly match for warships, submarines and merchant men. Their hulls are thin and their sides are small but their offensive and defensive armament is varied and effective. It consists of fifty caliber anti-aircraft machine guns, torpedoes and depth charges. These training pictures were taken at the United States Navy Motor torpedoed boat training center, Melville, Rhode Island. In their training, the tiny PT boat is learning to be constantly on the alert. In the background a crew member sighted the 50-caliber anti-aircraft machine gun while the officer in the foreground scans the sky for planes

Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland. Gas demonstration. A former Detroit truck driver now in a chemical warfare unit

Fort Knox. Browning machine gun. This staff sergeant of the armored forces teaches young soldiers some of the fine points of mechanized warfare at Fort Knox, Kentucky. He gives Uncle Sam a mighty good value for his ninety-six dollars monthly base pay

Fort Knox. Electric power line construction. A new electric power line for the Army. A pole line crew of a large construction company extends service into Fort Knox, Kentucky, where American soldiers are training and hardening for modern warfare

Conservation. Used typewriter campaign. The War Production Board (WPB) has launched a campaign to secure 600,000 used typewriters from business firms and private individuals. These machines are needed by the Army, Navy, Maritime Commission, Board of Economic Warfare, Lend-Lease and other government departments and agencies. Don MacDonald, Washington, D.C. typewriter dealer, affixes a decalcomania on a machine turned in to the government by John Stockham, Washington, D.C. insurance man. This was one of the first typewriters thus enlisted in the war effort. The decalcomania reads: "Property of U.S. Government - severe penalties for unlawful use"

Fort Knox. Armored force personnel. A first sergeant of the armored forces pulls his motorcycle to a standstill to study the effect of a tactical move during war games at Fort Knox, Kentucky, where young soldiers are learning the latest tricks of mechanized warfare

Fort Knox, Kentucky. Light tanks. The light tanks used at Fort Knox, Kentucky, for training and hardening crews for our armored forces, are graduating tough, competent "tankers" who will soon be giving the Axis some pointers on modern warfare

Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland. Gas demonstration. A former construction worker now in a trench mortar crew in a chemical warfare unit

Fort Knox. A top sergeant of the armored forces snatches a smoke during recent war games at Fort Knox, Kentucky. He has the job of teaching a new outfit some of the latest tricks of mechanized warfare

Captain William W. Kitchen instructing a U.S. Army chaplain school class in gas warfare and the use of gas masks. Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana

American army instructor, assigned to teach Chinese soldiers the ins and outs of modern warfare, inspecting one of their rifles

Science and research. Mineral prospecting. Intensity of the earth's magnetic field, something a mining engineer needs to know if he is looking for vital metals under the crust of the earth, may be measured by the horizontal magnetometer and the vertical magnetometer shown here. Three engineering students employ geophysical methods, which they will use after they complete their training courses, for war jobs in the minerals industry or commission in the armed forces. Their knowledge will be applied to airplane detection and anti-submarine warfare. Most of the students are now in the enlisted reserve. Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado

Captain William W. Kitchen instructing a Chaplain School class in gas warfare and the use of gas masks. U.S. Army chaplain school, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana

Parris Island. Marine Corps. "And we're proud to bear the title of U.S. Marines." Your true leatherneck, adept at every specialized branch of modern warfare, is just plain soldier at the core. These marines, finishing training at Parris Island, uphold the soldierly traditions of the nation's finest corps

Naval air base. Corpus Christi, Texas. Like a man from Mars, a sailor at the Corpus Christi, Texas, naval air base wears the new type of protective clothing and gas mask designed for use in chemical warfare. These uniforms are lighter than the old type

Fort Knox, Kentucky. Light tanks. The light tanks used at Fort Knox, Kentucky, for training and hardening crews for our armored forces, are graduating tough, competent "tankers" who will soon be giving the Axis some pointers on modern warfare

Scott Field, Illinois. Nurses must acquaint themselves with the use of the gas mask. If chemical warfare should ever be used by the enemy, the Army will have familiarized all the members of its personnel with the best methods for overcoming such attack. An instructor leading the nurses double-time through a field during a simulated gas attack

Sergeant Maxfield Hurlbut Dunlap, former employee of the Board of Economic Warfare types reports on the progress of maneuvers in this picture taken during his basic recruit training at the Marine Corps base at Parris Island, South Carolina. Sergeant Dunlap is now serving as a fighting reporter in a combat area for the Division of Public Relations, U.S. Marine Corps

Fort Knox. Electric power line construction. A new electric power line for the Army. A pole line crew of a large construction company extends service into Fort Knox, Kentucky, where American soldiers are training and hardening for modern warfare

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Volunteer fire watchers, sitting on the fire engines in the fire house, listening to a lecture on the uses of gas in warfare given by Raymond Runk

Fort Knox. Electric power line construction. A new electric power line for the Army. A pole line crew of a large construction company extends service into Fort Knox, Kentucky, where American soldiers are training and hardening for modern warfare

Fort Knox, Kentucky. Light tanks. The light tanks used at Fort Knox, Kentucky, for training and hardening crews for our armored forces, are graduating tough, competent "tankers" who will soon be giving the Axis some pointers on modern warfare

Captain William W. Kitchen instructing a chaplain school class in gas warfare and the use of gas masks. U.S. Army chaplain school. Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana

Fort Knox, Kentucky. Light tanks. The light tanks used at Fort Knox, Kentucky, for training and hardening crews for our armored forces, are graduating tough, competent "tankers" who will soon be giving the Axis some pointers on modern warfare

Parris Island. Marine Corps. "And we're proud to bear the title of U.S. Marines." Your true leatherneck, adept at every specialized branch of modern warfare, is just plain soldier at the core. These marines, finishing training at Parris Island, uphold the soldierly traditions of the nation's finest corps

Big throat, big voice. Boring operations are finished on a major-caliber gun at an eastern arsenal. This big boy will soon be ready to speak with authority for total warfare

Fort Knox. Halftrac armored cars. Three halftrac armored cars move in formation as soldiers in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky practice some new methods in the art of mechanized warfare. Capable of rapid travel over difficult terrain, these versatile cars have many important uses in an army on the move

Conservation. Used typewriter campaign. The War Production Board (WPB) has launched a campaign to secure 600,000 used typewriters from business firms and private individuals. These machines are needed by the Army, Navy, Maritime Commission, Board of Economic Warfare, Lend-Lease and other government departments and agencies. John K. Stockham, Washington, D.C. insurance man, turns in one of his typewriters to the government. This is one of the first machines thus enlisted in the war effort

Parris Island. Marine Corps. "And we're proud to bear the title of U.S. Marines." Your true leatherneck, adept at every specialized branch of modern warfare, is just plain soldier at the core. These marines, finishing training at Parris Island, uphold the soldierly traditions of the nation's finest corps

Parris Island. Marine Corps. "And we're proud to bear the title of U.S. Marines." Your true leatherneck, adept at every specialized branch of modern warfare, is just plain soldier at the core. These marines, finishing training at Parris Island, uphold the soldierly traditions of the nation's finest corps

Parris Island. Marine Corps. "And we're proud to bear the title of U.S. Marines." Your true leatherneck, adept at every specialized branch of modern warfare, is just plain soldier at the core. These marines, finishing training at Parris Island, uphold the soldierly traditions of the nation's finest corps

Captain William W. Kitchen instructing chaplain school class in gas warfare and the use of gas masks. U.S. Army chaplain school, Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana

Fort Knox, Kentucky. Light tanks. The light tanks used at Fort Knox, Kentucky, for training and hardening crews for our armored forces, are graduating tough, competent "tankers" who will soon be giving the Axis some pointers on modern warfare

Parris Island. Marine Corps. "And we're proud to bear the title of U.S. Marines." Your true leatherneck, adept at every specialized branch of modern warfare, is just plain soldier at the core. These marines, finishing training at Parris Island, uphold the soldierly traditions of the nation's finest corps

Naval air base, Corpus Christi, Texas. Civilian gas mask approved by the Navy is demonstrated by a sailor mechanics at the chemical warfare school of the naval air base in Corpus Christi, Texas. This type of mask is said to be good for four hours without refill

Manpower. Negro navy yard workers. So that America's paratroopers may write history in this new field of modern warfare, these women workers in the aircraft factory of an Eastern navy yard are turning miles of silk into parachutes for our armed forces

Parris Island. Marine Corps. "And we're proud to bear the title of U.S. Marines." Your true leatherneck, adept at every specialized branch of modern warfare, is just plain soldier at the core. These marines, finishing training at Parris Island, uphold the soldierly traditions of the nation's finest corps

Conservation. Used typewriter campaign. The War Production Board (WPB) has launched a campaign to secure 600,000 used typewriters from business firms and private individuals. These machines are needed by the Army, Navy, Maritime Commission, Board of Economic Warfare, Lend-Lease and other government departments and agencies. John K. Stockham, Washington, D.C. insurance man, turns a machine over to Don MacDonald, Washington, D.C. typewriter dealer, who accepts it on behalf of the government at the fixed rate. This is one of the first typewriters thus enlisted in the war effort

Nurse training. Nurses learn the care of patients suffering from burns. Here, the nurse paints a boy's burned back with sulfathiasol. The treatment of burns is of much public interest in these days of warfare on civilian populations with incendiary bombs

Parris Island. Marine Corps. "And we're proud to bear the title of U.S. Marines." Your true leatherneck, adept at every specialized branch of modern warfare, is just plain soldier at the core. These marines, finishing training at Parris Island, uphold the soldierly traditions of the nation's finest corps

Hermann Spitzer, consultant on psychological warfare. Far East Section, Overseas Branch, Office of War Information

Natives aid Allied drive in New Guinea jungles. Dense jungles, deep ravines and high mountain ranges make transport extremely difficult for the Allied troops in the New Guniea area. Outrigger supply services, manned by natives, are of invaluable aid in waging tropic warfare

"Mac" the giant killer.

Three years' men wanted! For the sixth ward. Recruiting & substitute office, corner of Main and Water Streets, (in the old steamboat office. Peoria, Illinois). Committee of the sixth ward: Chas. Raymond, J. C. Eichhorn, David Wheeler.

New Wage-Hour Administrator gets helping hand from missus. Washington, D.C., Aug. 18. Working without pay, Mrs. Elmer F. Andrews, wife of the newly appointed Wage-hour Administrator, is helping her husband organize his new office force which has already been swamped with thousands of letters from employers. Administrator Andrews looks on while his wife sorts the mail in this photograph. Mrs. Andrew is no novice at government work, having served in the chemical warfare service during the World War days, 8/18/38

The Union Volunteers: song by E.C. Saffery.

The Union Volunteers: song by E.C. Saffery.

The Union Volunteers: song by E.C. Saffery.

The Union Volunteers: song by E.C. Saffery.

The Union Volunteers: song by E.C. Saffery.

The Chicago Times, [newspaper]. April 18, 1865.

The Chicago Times, [newspaper]. April 18, 1865.

The Chicago Times, [newspaper]. April 18, 1865.

The Chicago Times, [newspaper]. April 18, 1865.

The Chicago Times, [newspaper]. April 24, 1865.

The Chicago Times, [newspaper]. April 24, 1865.

The Chicago Times, [newspaper]. April 24, 1865.

The Chicago Times, [newspaper]. April 24, 1865.

Starved in prison words and music by Geo. F. Root.

Starved in prison words and music by Geo. F. Root.

Starved in prison words and music by Geo. F. Root.

Starved in prison words and music by Geo. F. Root.

Starved in prison words and music by Geo. F. Root.

Starved in prison words and music by Geo. F. Root.

New York Times, [newspaper]. April 26, 1865.

New York Times, [newspaper]. April 26, 1865.

New York Times, [newspaper]. April 26, 1865.

New York Times, [newspaper]. April 26, 1865.

New York Times, [newspaper]. April 26, 1865.

New York Times, [newspaper]. April 26, 1865.