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First telegraphic message---24 May 1844

First telegraphic message---24 May 1844

When decoded, this paper tape recording of the historic message transmitted by Samuel F. B. Morse reads, "What hath God wrought?" Morse sent it from the Supreme Court room in the U.S. Capitol in Washington to h... more

Notebooks---2 August-12 September 1831 and diary fragments

Notebooks---2 August-12 September 1831 and diary fragments

In 1829, Morse left the United States to spend nearly three years studying art in Europe. He visited London and Switzerland, but spent much of his time in Paris and Italy. During these years, Morse kept a serie... more

Bound volume---28 November 1835-18 April 1838

Bound volume---28 November 1835-18 April 1838

During his work on the telegraph, Morse needed political help to obtain support from Congress as much as he required technical and financial assistance, and this formal agreement allowed him to achieve all thre... more

Bound volume---15 January-8 June 1844

Bound volume---15 January-8 June 1844

Seven days after his great success with the first telegraph message, Morse writes, in a humble and cautious tone, to his brother, Sidney, of the responsibilities of success. Twice he quotes the famous message, ... more

Bound volume---12 August 1854-22 June 1855

Bound volume---12 August 1854-22 June 1855

One of the first Americans to make daguerreotypes in the United States, Morse opened a studio in New York in 1840. There, he received many students who paid him to teach them the new daguerreotype process. More... more

Reports
Notebooks---2 August-12 September 1831 and diary fragments

Notebooks---2 August-12 September 1831 and diary fragments

In 1829, Morse left the United States to spend nearly three years studying art in Europe. He visited London and Switzerland, but spent much of his time in Paris and Italy. During these years, Morse kept a serie... more

Bound volume---28 November 1835-18 April 1838

Bound volume---28 November 1835-18 April 1838

During his work on the telegraph, Morse needed political help to obtain support from Congress as much as he required technical and financial assistance, and this formal agreement allowed him to achieve all thre... more

Bound volume---15 January-8 June 1844

Bound volume---15 January-8 June 1844

Seven days after his great success with the first telegraph message, Morse writes, in a humble and cautious tone, to his brother, Sidney, of the responsibilities of success. Twice he quotes the famous message, ... more

Bound volume---12 August 1854-22 June 1855

Bound volume---12 August 1854-22 June 1855

One of the first Americans to make daguerreotypes in the United States, Morse opened a studio in New York in 1840. There, he received many students who paid him to teach them the new daguerreotype process. More... more

Reports
Notebooks---2 August-12 September 1831 and diary fragments

Notebooks---2 August-12 September 1831 and diary fragments

In 1829, Morse left the United States to spend nearly three years studying art in Europe. He visited London and Switzerland, but spent much of his time in Paris and Italy. During these years, Morse kept a serie... more

Bound volume---28 November 1835-18 April 1838

Bound volume---28 November 1835-18 April 1838

During his work on the telegraph, Morse needed political help to obtain support from Congress as much as he required technical and financial assistance, and this formal agreement allowed him to achieve all thre... more

Bound volume---15 January-8 June 1844

Bound volume---15 January-8 June 1844

Seven days after his great success with the first telegraph message, Morse writes, in a humble and cautious tone, to his brother, Sidney, of the responsibilities of success. Twice he quotes the famous message, ... more

Bound volume---12 August 1854-22 June 1855

Bound volume---12 August 1854-22 June 1855

One of the first Americans to make daguerreotypes in the United States, Morse opened a studio in New York in 1840. There, he received many students who paid him to teach them the new daguerreotype process. More... more

Reports

Library Of Congress

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