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[Illustration for chapter one of L'art de jetter les bombes showing a man standing amid artillery shooting cannon balls]

[Illustration for chapter one of L'art de jetter les bombes showing a ...

Title devised by Library staff. Illus. in: L'art de jetter les bombes, ... / par Monsieur Blondel. Paris : Chez l'autheur et N. Langlois, 1683. Published in: The tradition of technology : Landmarks of Western t... More

Perspective view of landing the cannon, bombs, provisions, and water, for the Army

Perspective view of landing the cannon, bombs, provisions, and water, ...

This record contains unverified data from PGA shelflist card. Associated name on shelflist card: Mason. First words of title not recorded on shelflist card

[Submarine ("Submarine Vessel, Submarine Bombs and Mode of Attack") for the United States government. Submarine vessel, longitudinal section]

[Submarine ("Submarine Vessel, Submarine Bombs and Mode of Attack") fo...

Inscribed: Plate the first ; half an inch to a foot ; Robt. Fulton 1806.

[Submarine ("Submarine Vessel, Submarine Bombs and Mode of Attack") for the United States government. Water chambers, valves, water passages]

[Submarine ("Submarine Vessel, Submarine Bombs and Mode of Attack") fo...

Title devised by Library staff. Exhibited: American Treasures of the Library of Congress, 2004.

[Submarine ("Submarine Vessel, Submarine Bombs and Mode of Attack") for the United States government. Vessel under sail and anchored]

[Submarine ("Submarine Vessel, Submarine Bombs and Mode of Attack") fo...

"Plate the seventh." Signed and dated "Robert Fulton 1806."

This will be an internal explosion / Keppler.

This will be an internal explosion / Keppler.

Print shows the child king Alfonso XIII as a wooden puppet slumped over on the "Throne of Spain" with a clergyman standing next to him, and on the walls to the right are portrait paintings of "Charles V, Ferdin... More

"Gimbel Sample" bombs
L.M. Kanonenboot iltis im gefecht mit den takuforts am 17 Juni 1900

L.M. Kanonenboot iltis im gefecht mit den takuforts am 17 Juni 1900

General information about the Popular and Applied Graphic Art print materials is available at: https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.pga Title information compiled by Junior Fellows, 2005-2017. Stower, W., artist. Sta... More

Specimens of ancient and modern Chinese shells captured by the Allied Forces, Tien-tsin, China
Merry Christmas in Boston / Keppler.

Merry Christmas in Boston / Keppler.

Illustration shows Thomas W. Lawson standing among Christmas gifts and a notice posted on the wall, which states "Christmas Greeting to Lawson Put all insurance proxies in your possession on the State House St... More

Uneasy Turks / L.M. Glackens.

Uneasy Turks / L.M. Glackens.

Illustration shows two turkeys, one dressed as a Turk standing among smoking bombs and pumpkins, beneath clouds that rain axes, bombs, vegetables, pies, and rifles upon them. Title from item. Illus. in: Puck, v... More

Inspector Eagan & bombs

Inspector Eagan & bombs

Photograph shows Owen Eagan (1957-1920), a bomb expert in the New York City Fire Department's Bureau of Combustibles. He is holding a bomb recovered from an attempted anarchist bombing of St. Patrick's Cathedra... More

German Protection against gas bombs

German Protection against gas bombs

Photograph shows German soldier wearing a face mask to protect against gas attacks during World War I. (Source: Flickr Commons project, 2012)

King Geo. studies trench bombs

King Geo. studies trench bombs

Photograph shows British officers explaining trench mortar to King George V and Edward, Prince of Wales at the Trench Warfare School, Helfaut, France during World War I, July 7, 1917. (Source: Flickr Commons pr... More

[Man with bombs? at airplane]
Palestine disturbances 1936. Jaffa Gate police-station windows being screened against insertions of bombs
[Bombs? and airplanes]
Panay hero receives Navy Cross. Washington, D.C., July 1. Fireman first class John L. Hodge, who is recuperating at Naval Hospital here, was today decorated with the Navy Cross for the bravery he displayed during the sinking of the U.S. gunboat Panay by Japanese bombs last year. Assistant Secretary of the Navy Charles Edison is pictured pinning the award on the Bluejacket. It was hodge who carried Jim Marshall, staff writer for Collier's injured in the bombing, from the scene of the sinking vessel to Wuhu, China, a distance of about 17 miles, 7/1/38
Plane with cruising radius of 11,000 miles at 380 miles per hour plan of Glenn Martin. Washington, D.C., Feb. 28. Glenn L. Martin, Baltimore airplane manufacturer, today told amazed members of the House Naval Affairs Committee when he told he is studying plans for a new super ship capable of cruising 11,000 miles at 380 miles per hour with 4,000 pounds of bombs. The ship he is planning to build will dwarf even the biggest planes now in use, Martin added. Martin was testifying on President Roosevelt's billion- dollar Naval Expansion Program, 2/28/38
An American pineapple, of the kind the Axis finds hard to digest, is ready to leave the hand of an infantryman in training at Fort Belvoir, Va. American soldiers make good grenade throwers

An American pineapple, of the kind the Axis finds hard to digest, is r...

12002-69. Transfer from U.S. Office of War Information, 1944. General information about the FSA/OWI Color Photographs is available at http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.fsac Title from FSA or OWI agency caption. Add... More

An American pineapple, of the kind the Axis finds hard to digest, is ready to leave the hand of an infantryman in training at Fort Belvoir, Va. American soldiers make good grenade throwers
U.S. Air Force bombs Tripoli. Clouds of smoke tell the story of the successful raid by U.S. Army Air Force bombers on the Spanish mole at Tripoli. Their objective was only the mole and not ships in the harbor. This third picture in a series was taken as the bomber group finished its mission
Bombs hurtle toward a Nazi highway bridge. With their rail and shipping facilities almost completely disrupted, the Germans were forced to resort to motor transport. All roads and bridges in central Italy became targets for Allied aerial assaults
Salvo of 600-pound bombs falling from formation of B-10 bombers in recent bombing practice by the 19th Bombardment Group, General Headquarters, Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps
B-24 Liberator bomber and C-87 Liberator Express. Mighty four-engine B-24 Liberator bombers are playing an important role in Allied bombing missions. Capable of carrying more than six tons of bombs, the B-24 range of 3,000 miles enables it to penetrate deep into enemy territory
U.S. Air Force bombs Tripoli. U.S. Army bombers made their first raid on Tripoli recently and returned with this unusal series of pictures showing the results of the raid. Their objective was the Spanish mole at upper left and they were not aiming at ships in the harbor. This photo first in the series was taken at the start of the raid
Bombs away! At the proper moment the bombardiers release their load. A salvo, such as this, finds all bombs dropping in a straight line, because each of them continues, for a time, at the same forward speed it had acquired while in the plane's bomb bay. Three miles down below is the target, the objective of this raid. After this salvo, the bombardier may direct the pilot to fly back over the target for another crack at it
Lend-Lease to Britain. American 1,100-pound bombs to be used by the Royal Air Force are stacked in an ammunition dump in England, after arriving from the United States in a lend-lease shipment. The dump is in a tunnel one hundred feet underground hewn from solid rock
U.S. Air Force bombs Tripoli. Clouds of smoke tell the story of the successful raid by U.S. Army Air Force bombers on the Spanish mole at Tripoli. Their objective was only the mole and not ships in the harbor. This third picture in a series was taken as the bomber group finished its mission
Lend-Lease to Britain. Aerial bombs of 250 tons shipped from the United States under lend-lease are stacked in a dump hewn from solid rock one hundred feet below the surface in England
A Nazi bridge is put out of commission. Black smoke engulfs a railway bridge on the line from Florence to Rome after it was straddled by bombs. For two months Allied bombers pounded German railroad installations forcing the enemy to depend increasingly upon cargo vessels and motor vehicles for transportation
Aircraft. Naval. The Navy's "Coronado" (PB2Y-2) was designed by Consolidated for long-range patrol and transport missions. It is an all-metal, high-wing flying boat powered by four Pratt and Whitney engines of 1,200 horsepower each. Its speed is over 200 miles per hour, its range over 3,000 miles, its service ceiling approximately 20,000 feet, its load capacity 30,000 pounds. It carries a crew of ten men armed with 50-caliber machine guns and bombs
Bombs lie on an Allied airfield ready to be loaded into Royal Air Force Liberators. The British bombers of the Mediterranian Allied Air Forces worked with American Liberators to strangle German supply lines feeding Nazi troops on the Anzio, Cassino and Eighth Army fronts. French airmen also participated in the operation
Aircraft. Naval. The Navy's "Coronado" (PB2Y-2) was designed by Consolidated for long-range patrol and transport missions. It is an all-metal, high-wing flying boat powered by four Pratt and Whitney engines of 1,200 horsepower each. Its speed is over 200 miles per hour, its range over 3,000 miles, its service ceiling approximately 20,000 feet, its load capacity 30,000 pounds. It carries a crew of ten men armed with 50-caliber machine guns and bombs
Track damage in the Ostiense railroad yards as shown in a reconnaissance photo. In the background a monastery stands intact, untouched by bombs directed against military installations
Bombs away! At the proper moment the bombardiers release their load. A salvo, such as this, finds all bombs dropping in a straight line, because each of them continues, for a time, at the same forward speed it had acquired while in the plane's bomb bay. Three miles down below is the target, the objective of this raid. After this salvo, the bombardier may direct the pilot to fly back over the target for another crack at it

Bombs away! At the proper moment the bombardiers release their load. A...

Actual size of negative is B (approximately 5 x 7 inches). Caption card lists some of the printing history for image. Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Inform... More

Bombs away. U.S. B-26 medium bombers drop their eggs on ports, bridges, and railroad yards in central Italy. Practically every type of combat aircraft in the Mediterranean Allied Air Forces, from the heavy Flying Fortresses to the light fighter escorts, participated in "Operation Strangle"
Aircraft. Naval. The Consolidated "Mariner" (PBM-3) serves the Navy as a patrol bomber or transport. It is an all-metal flying boat with high gull wings. It has a speed of over 200 miles per hour, a range of over 3,000 miles, a ceiling of over 15,000 feet and a load capacity of 20,000 pounds. The crew of nine men is armed with 50-caliber machine guns and bombs
Ranger battalions train with commando troops. Troops of the ranger battalions, America's special service soldiers, are now in training somewhere in the United Kingdom. They have been attached to combined operations, commanded by Vice Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten. Training under commando instructors and an opposed landing operation with British Naval instructors. Live ammunitionand trench mortor bombs are used to create a realistic effect and prepare the men for combat conditions
Civilian protection. A New York City volunteer auxiliary firemen illustrates in a demonstration in New York his efficiency in the event of an incendiary bombing attack. This worker, equipped with an "Indian" fire pump, is mounting a scaling ladder to the roof of a building on which several incendiary bombs have fallen. The pump is useful for extinguishing small blazes, and especially valuable in fighting incendiary bombs
Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. USS West Virginia aflame.  Disregarding the dangerous possibilities of explosions, United States sailors man their boats at the side of the burning battleship, USS West Virginia, to better fight the flames started by Japanese torpedoes and bombs. Note the national colors flying against the smoke-blackened sky
Civilian protection. An old scene in a new dress. On call in the event of any emergency these volunteer air raid protection workers are enjoying in a quiet game. The armband of the man in the foreground indicates that he is an auxiliary fireman. Against the wall in the rear is some of the equipment used by these volunteers in case of air attack. To the left, are a pair of snuffers, used to extinguish incendiary bombs, and a scaling ladder. On the windowsill are sand bags, and just below the window a portable stirrup pump and a pair of "indian fire pumps, all useful in fighting blazes from incendiary bombs and other causes

Civilian protection. An old scene in a new dress. On call in the event...

Actual size of negative is C (approximately 4 x 5 inches). Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944... More

Constable Scott of London (right) with Director Landis of Office of Civilian Defense (center) and Major General L. D. Gasser, Head of Protection Division, Office of Civilian Defense (left). Dean Landis holds a sandbag with hand grip used to extinguish incendiary bombs. This type of bag also serves as protection in approaching bomb

Constable Scott of London (right) with Director Landis of Office of Ci...

Actual size of negative is C (approximately 4 x 5 inches). Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944... More

Civilian protection. An old scene in a new dress. On call in the event of any emergency these volunteer air raid protection workers are enjoying in a quiet game.  The armband of the man in the foreground indicates that he is an auxiliary fireman. Against the wall in the rear is some of the equipment used by these volunteers in case of air attack. To the left, are a pair of snuffers, used to extinguish incendiary bombs, and a scaling ladder. On the windowsill are sand bags, and just below the window a portable stirrup pump and a pair of "indian fire pumps, all useful in fighting blazes from incendiary bombs and other causes
Constable Scott of London (right) with Director Landis of Office of Civilian Defense (center) and Major General L. D. Gasser, Head of Protection Division, Office of Civilian Defense (left). Dean Landis holds a sandbag with hand grip used to extinguish incendiary bombs. This type of bag also serves as protection in approaching bomb
The air raid protective services. Ever on the alert is the firewatcher, who mounts to a rooftop at the first alarm. He is responsible for detecting incendiary bombs, and is trained in the methods of fighting them
Singapore's A.R.F. [i.e. A.R.P.] These air raid wardens are dousing an incendiary bomb in Singapore's central city square (Raffles Place). It is only, however, part of a regular weekly mass demonstration to make Singaporean[s] bomb conscious and informed.

Singapore's A.R.F. [i.e. A.R.P.] These air raid wardens are dousing an...

Photograph shows silhouette of a man putting out fire with sparks behind him. Title from item. British Official photo: K-1256. No. BO-725. Forms part of: FSA/OWI Collection (Library of Congress).

Civilian protection. Fully equipped to cope with whatever difficulties they may encounter, these New York City volunteer auxiliary firemen workers are climbling up a fire ladder to the roof of a building struck by bombs. Fartherest up the ladder is a worker equipped with an "Indian" fire pump, valuable in fighting incendiary bombs. The man below him is carrying a two-way portable radio. Next is a volunteer worker with a portable acetylene torch, used for cutting through metal to effect entrances or to extricate victims pinned under fallen metal. The man just starting up the ladder is carrying a roof rope, and all are equipped with gas masks
Civilian protection. The fire watcher must wait long and tedious hours, ever on the alert for falling incendiary bombs which he must then reach quickly with his crew to dispose of them before they have had a chance to start a major blaze
Singapore's A.R.P. These air raid wardens are dousing an incendiary bomb in Singapore's central city square (Raffles Place). It is only however part of a regular weekly mass demonstration to make Singaporean's bomb conscious and informed.

Singapore's A.R.P. These air raid wardens are dousing an incendiary bo...

Photograph shows three men spraying water on lit material as crowd watches. Title from item. British Official photo: K-1258. No. BO-682. Forms part of: FSA/OWI Collection (Library of Congress).

The air raid protective services. In the wake of the bombs come the demolition and clearance crews, whose work is essential to efficient air raid protection. They must keep the vital roads and alleys clear so that other workers can get to the trouble spots. They are trained in the efficient use of power shovels and other time-saving tools
Air raid protection--what to do in your home. This is not the way to spend the evening, but simply a handy place to go if bombs suddenly start falling nearby. A heavy, sturdy table will not only keep off falling plaster that may be shaken down by a nearby burst, but would even help to support beams if the upper stories should come down. A shelter such as this will give the rescue squads a chance to save you. One precaution: keep that table away from the window
California hit. Battered by aerial bombs and torpedoes, the U.S.S. California settles slowly into the mud and muck of Pearl Harbor. Clouds of black oily smoke pouring up from the California and her stricken sister ships conceal all but the hulk of the capsized U.S.S. Oklahoma at extreme right
Air raid protection--what to do in your home. This is not the way to spend the evening, but simply a handy place to go if bombs suddenly start falling nearby. A heavy, sturdy table will not only keep off falling plaster that may be shaken down by a nearby burst, but would even help to support beams if the upper stories should come down. A shelter such as this will give the rescue squads a chance to save you. One precaution: keep that table away from the window
Civilian protection. Fully equipped to cope with whatever difficulties they may encounter, these New York City volunteer auxiliary firemen workers are climbling up a fire ladder to the roof of a building struck by bombs. Fartherest up the ladder is a worker equipped with an "Indian" fire pump, valuable in fighting incendiary bombs. The man below him is carrying a two-way portable radio. Next is a volunteer worker with a portable acetylene torch, used for cutting through metal to effect entrances or to extricate victims pinned under fallen metal. The man just starting up the ladder is carrying a roof rope, and all are equipped with gas masks

Civilian protection. Fully equipped to cope with whatever difficulties...

Actual size of negative is C (approximately 4 x 5 inches). Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944... More

Civilian defense. Extremely valuable in battling incendiary bombs is the stirrup pump operated by three, or in cases of emergency, two men. The volunteer worker closest to the camera is pumping water from the bucket on the reef, while the man barely visible in the center replenishes the water supply from another bucket. The third volunteer, holding the nozzle, which may be adjusted to provide either a spray or a steady stream of water, is spraying magnesium incendiary bomb and the area around it. New improved pumps are being produced in American factories
The air raid protective services. In the wake of the bombs come the demolition and clearance crews, whose work is essential to efficient air raid protection. They must keep the vital roads and alleys clear so that other workers can get to the trouble spots. They are trained in the efficient use of power shovels and other time-saving tools
Civilian protection. Fire watchers from points of vantage on roof tops and streets maintain unceasing vigilance for fallen incendiary bombs. They immediately seek to control them with equipment stored nearby
Civilian protection. Here's one volunteer who asks no questions. He's starting to climb into a danger area where his aid is vitally needed. He's bound for the roof of a building which has been struck by several incendiary bombs, where he will work with other volunteer auxiliary firemen to keep the damage to a minimum
Civilian protection. A New York City volunteer auxiliary firemen illustrates in a demonstration in New York his efficiency in the event of an incendiary bombing attack. This worker, equipped with an "Indian" fire pump, is mounting a scaling ladder to the roof of a building on which several incendiary bombs have fallen. The pump is useful for extinguishing small blazes, and especially valuable in fighting incendiary bombs

Civilian protection. A New York City volunteer auxiliary firemen illus...

Actual size of negative is C (approximately 4 x 5 inches). Caption card lists some of the printing history of image. Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Informa... More

Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. This worker in a small Midwest factory is handling dies for use in producing incendiary bombs. The company, which formerly made doll's furniture, is now operating under subcontract for war production Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio

Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. This worker in...

Actual size of negative is C (approximately 4 x 5 inches). Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944... More

Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. This milling machine formerly used in producing metal furniture for doll houses, has a much more important task these days. It's scraping steel plate to be used in bomb dies. Location: a small factory, somewhere in the middle west. Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio

Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. This milling m...

Actual size of negative is C (approximately 4 x 5 inches). Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944... More

Fort Benning. Bomber planes. An American bombardier in training at Fort Benning, Georgia makes accurate hits with practice bombs that will later be exchanged for the real "eggs for war."
Conversion.Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. The hands that rocks the cradle can also rock the Axis. American women are rapidly taking their places on the industrial front. Here in this small Midwest factory, the owner's wife operates one of the machines making dies for incendiary bombs. Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio

Conversion.Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. The hands that ...

Actual size of negative is C (approximately 4 x 5 inches). Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944... More

Lititz, Pennsylvania. Boy Scouts listening to lecture on German bombs during their training as messengers
Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. Section of the TVA's phosphoric acid plant operated in conjunction with the making of elemental phosphorus in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke and silica together in electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill
Lititz, Pennsylvania. Raymond Runk, accountant at the Animal Trap Company and fire captain, giving a lecture on German bombs to Boy Scouts who are learning to be messengers. In emergencies, their duty would be to report fire bombs to the proper people
Somewhere in Eastern India. Royal Air Force men are putting bombs on legs of a "Mohawk." These excellent fighters carry six bombs as well as six machine guns

Somewhere in Eastern India. Royal Air Force men are putting bombs on l...

Actual size of negative is C (approximately 4 x 5 inches). Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944... More

Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A stack in the TVA phosphoric acid plant in the Muscle Shoals area. Phosphoric acid is produced in conjunction with the making of elemental phosphorus. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke and silica together in electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill
Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. This small Midwest machine shop used to manufacture doll's furniture and fly swatters before Pearl Harbor. Today, busy with subcontracts on war production orders, they're hurrying the last lengths of swatter-wire off the machines. Circular machines at right cuts and twists the lengths of wire. Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio
Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. This milling machine formerly used in producing metal furniture for doll houses, has a much more important task these days. It's scraping steel plate to be used in bomb dies. Location: a small factory, somewhere in the middle west. Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio
Pearl Harbor bombing. Hangar fire. Japanese bombs wrecked and fired this hangar at the U.S. naval air station, Pearl Harbor, in addition to causing extensive damage to planes on the apron and runways, several of which may be seen in the foreground
Pearl Harbor bombing. Wrecked seaplane. One of the 80 U.S. Navy planes wrecked by Japanese bombs and bullets during the air attacks on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. The plane was an OS2U, an Observation Scout built by Vought-Sikorsky
Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. Dies to destroy the Axis. The owner of this small Midwest factory inspects dies for making incendiary bombs. Note doll's furniture on the wall, the company's previous product. Complete conversion of all machines for this factory's production of war essentials is rapidly taking place. Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio
Pearl Harbor bombing. Drydock bound. The USS West Virginia, sunk at her berth by Japanese torpedoes and bombs during the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, was raised sufficiently to enable her to be towed to drydock. She is shown here being maneuvered by tugs, preliminary to the start of repairs
Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. This small Midwest machine shop used to manufacture doll's furniture and fly swatters before Pearl Harbor. Subcontracts on defense orders now occupy all machines as rapidly as the old stock can be assembled. Here two high school boys complete machine work on metal legs for the furniture. Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio
School boys trained to deal with incendiary bombs in the USSR (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics)
Fort Benning. Loading planes. Axis, beware! Bombardiers in training at Fort Benning, Georgia use practice bombs to learn the routine of loading a light bombing plane
Royal Air Force Bostons in daylight raid on Saint Malo. Boston bomber, escorted by fighters, on July 31 carried out successful attack in daylight on harbour works and installations at Saint Malo, and returned with photographs providing evidence that their bombs were well in the target area. At least sixteen bombursts can be seen in and around the bassin Dunguay Trouin, eleven in, or adjecent to, a builders' yard. Of the bursts in the bassin itself, one is a near miss on a 300 foot motor vessel, another a near miss on three barges on the opposite side of the bassin, and a third is either on the stern or on the quay alongside a motor vessel of 250-300 feet
Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A Negro worker tending an electric phosphate smelting furnace which is producing elemental phosphorus at a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke and silica together in the electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available it is converted into highly concentrated phosphate fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill
Tennessee Valley Authority production. Chemical plants. Studies in the high-pressure synthesis of gases are being made continuously in the TVA laboratories in the Muscle Shoals area. The plants served by these laboratories make ammonia for conversion into ammonium nitrate for use in the manufacture of high explosive shells, elemental phosphorus for incendiary bombs and shells, phosphoric acid and highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizers
Fort Benning. Loading planes. Axis, beware! Bombardiers in training at Fort Benning, Georgia use practice bombs to learn the routine of loading a light bombing plane
Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A large electric phosphate smelting furnace used in the making of elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke, and silica together in the electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available, it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill
Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A section of a TVA plant in the Muscle Shoals area in which phosphorus is produced in its elemental form. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke, and silica together in electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available, it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill
Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. This small Midwest machine shop used to manufacture doll's furniture and fly swatters before Pearl Harbor. Subcontracts on defense orders now occupy all machines as rapidly as the old stock can be assembled. Here two high school boys complete machine work on metal legs for the furniture. Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio
Pearl Harbor bombing. USS Shaw. Hit by three bombs which exploded her forward magazine, the 1,500 ton destroyer Shaw lies a twisted mass of wreckage in the heavily-bombed floating drydock YFD-2. Note the bow of the Shaw lying on its side in the foreground. Part of the drydock, at right, is under water while the other side is listing heavily. Both the Shaw and the drydock are now back in use
Fort Benning. Loading bombing planes. Axis, beware! Bombardiers in training at Fort Benning, Georgia use practice bombs to learn the routine of loading a light bombing plane
Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A large electric phosphate smelting furnace used in the making of elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke, and silica together in the electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available, it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill
Nurse training. Nurses learn the care of patients suffering from burns. Here, the nurse paints a boy's burned back with sulfathiasol. The treatment of burns is of much public interest in these days of warfare on civilian populations with incendiary bombs
Pearl Harbor bombing. USS West Virginia a flame. Disregarding the dangerous possibilities of explosions, U.S. sailors man their boats at the side of the burning battleship, USS West Virginia, to better fight the flames started by Japanese torpedoes and bombs. Note the national colors flying against the smoke-blackend sky
Axis, beware! Bombardiers in training at Fort Benning, Gerogia use practice bombs to learn the routine of loading a light bombing plane
Tennessee Valley Authority production. Chemical plants. Electrical transformers in one of the TVA plants in the Muscle Shoals area, producing war materials by gas synthesis. These plants make ammonia for conversion into ammonium nitrate for use in the manufacture of high explosive shells, elemental phosphorus for incendiary bombs and shells, phosphoric acid and highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizers
Conversion.Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. The hands that rocks the cradle can also rock the Axis. American women are rapidly taking their places on the industrial front. Here in this small Midwest factory, the owner's wife operates one of the machines making dies for incendiary bombs. Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio
Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A section of a TVA plant in the Muscle Shoals area in which phosphorus is produced in its elemental form. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke, and silica together in electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available, it is converted into highly concentrated phosphatic fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill
Lititz, Pennsylvania. Raymond Runk, accountant at the Animal Trap Company and fire captain, giving a lecture on German bombs to Boy Scouts who are learning to be messengers. In emergencies, their duty would be to report fire bombs to the proper people
North Saint Paul, Minnesota. Mr. H.E. Brandt, president of the Dobbins Manufacturing Company. His father comes from Smaland and his mother from Varmland, Sweden. Mr. Brandt manufactures portable drinking fountains used on submarines and other naval vessels and has just developed an apparatus for extinguishing incendiary bombs
Kiska, Aleutian Islands. Bombs dropping in train from a United States Army Air Force plane on a Jap objective. Our flyers in Alaska relentlessly pursue their assignment to blast the Japs from their Aleutian holdings. This is an unusually clear shot, for the area thereabouts is fog-bound a good deal of the time
Tennessee Valley Authority production. Elemental phosphorus. A Negro worker tending an electric phosphate smelting furnace which is producing elemental phosphorus at a TVA chemical plant in the Muscle Shoals area. The phosphorus, used in the manufacture of incendiary bombs and shells and of material for "smoke," is produced by smelting phosphate rock, coke and silica together in the electric furnaces and condensing the resulting phosphorus gases. When surplus phosphorus is available it is converted into highly concentrated phosphate fertilizer, much of which is shipped abroad under provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill
Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. More space for making bomb dies. The owner of a small factory and his wife inspect blue prints of the addition they need to accomodate their war production, on orders. Fifty, instead of seven men, will man the new shop. Sivon Machine Company, Painesville, Ohio

Conversion. Toy furniture to dies for incendiary bombs. More space for...

Actual size of negative is C (approximately 4 x 5 inches). Title and other information from caption card. Transfer; United States. Office of War Information. Overseas Picture Division. Washington Division; 1944... More

Somewhere in Eastern India. Royal Air Force men are putting bombs on legs of a "Mohawk." These excellent fighters carry six bombs as well as six machine guns
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