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America's petroleum industries pour out fuel and lubricants for the United Nations. Men at the wheels of large valves regulate the flow of oil into oil tankers at a U.S. Atlantic coast seaport. The oil, flowing from large storage tanks on the dock, is being transhipped to the armed forces of the U.S. and other of the United Nation. Through valves like these pour the derivative products of some of the 1,601,250,000 barrels of oil which the U.S. oil industry will produce this year. The fact that a U.S. Liberator four-motored bomber consumes 1,800 gallons of gasoline in one six-hour bombing run, enough to supply the average citizen motorist with fuel for four or five years of motoring, indicates the heavy volume of oil supplies required in the modern war

America's petroleum industries pour out fuel and lubricants for the United Nations. Men at the wheels of large valves regulate the flow of oil into oil tankers at a U.S. Atlantic coast seaport. The oil, flowing from large storage tanks on the dock, is being transhipped to the armed forces of the U.S. and other of the United Nation. Through valves like these pour the derivative products of some of the 1,601,250,000 barrels of oil which the U.S. oil industry will produce this year. The fact that a U.S. Liberator four-motored bomber consumes 1,800 gallons of gasoline in one six-hour bombing run, enough to supply the average citizen motorist with fuel for four or five years of motoring, indicates the heavy volume of oil supplies required in the modern war

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